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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
COMMITTEE/BOARD MINUTES 1974, 1975, & 1976 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

December 2, 1974 President's Office, Boston, MA 

December 4, 1974 UMASS Amherst 

December 17, 1974 President's Office, Boston, MA 

February 5, 1975 UMASS Boston 

April 2, 1975 UMASS Amherst 

May 7, 1975 UMASS Worcester 

June 4, 1975 UMASS Boston 

June 25, 1975 President's Office, Boston, MA 

September 3, 1975 UMASS Amherst 

October 1, 1975 UMASS Worcester 

November 5, 1975 UMASS Boston 

November 26, 1975 President's Office, Boston, MA 

December 3, 1975 UMASS Amherst 

STUDENT AFFAIRS 

December 17, 1974 President's Office, Boston, MA 

March 18, 1975 UMASS Amherst 

April 22, 1975 UMASS Amherst 

May 20, 1975 President's Office, Boston, MA 

June 4, 1975 UMASS Boston 

September 3, 1975 UMASS Amherst 

October 1, 1975 UMASS Worcester 

FINANCE 

December 17, 1974 President's Office, Boston, MA 
February 19, 1975 President's Office, Boston, MA 
March 5, 1975 President's Office, Boston, MA 
March 27, 1975 President's Office, Boston, MA 
April 22, 1975 President's Office, Boston, MA 
May 27, 1975 President's Office, Boston, MA 
June 4, 1975 UMASS Boston 
August 19, 1975 President's Office, Boston, MA 
October 22, 1975 President's Office, Boston, MA 
November 5, 1975 UMASS Boston 

LONG-RANGE PLANNING 

February 19, 1975 President's Office, Boston, MA 
April 16, 1975 President's Office, Boston, MA 
May 14, 1975 President's Office, Boston, MA 
May 27, 1975 President's Office, Boston, MA 
June 24, 1975 President's Office, Boston, MA 
October 10, 1975 UMASS Amherst 



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BUDGET 

February 19, 1975 President's Office, Boston, MA 

April 16, 1975 President's Office, Boston, MA 

May 7, 1975 UMASS Worcester 

May 27, 1975 President's Office, Boston, MA 

June 24, 1975 President's Office, Boston, MA 

September 11, 1975 UMASS Boston 

October 28, 1975 President's Office, Boston, MA 

November 26, 1975 President's Office, Boston, MA 

December 3, 1975 President's Office, Boston, MA 

BUDGET & FINANCE 

June 4, 1975 UMASS Boston 

May 27, 1975 President's Office, Boston, MA 

FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

February 5, 1975 UMASS Boston 

March 19, 1975 President's Office, Boston, MA 

April 22, 1975 President's Office, Boston, MA 

May 13, 1975 President's Office, Boston, MA 

June 18, 1975 President's Office, Boston, MA 

September 3, 1975 UMASS Amherst 

October 1, 1975 UMASS Worcester 

October 22, 1975 President's Office, Boston, MA 

November 5, 1975 UMASS Boston 

November 19, 1975 President's Office, Boston, MA 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

March 18, 1975 President's Office, Boston, MA 
April 16, 1975 President's Office, Boston, MA 
June 24, 1975 President's Office, Boston, MA 
October 24, 1975 President's Office, Boston, MA 
November 18, 1975 President's Office, Boston, MA 

HEALTH AFFAIRS 

December 11, 1975 President's Office, Boston, MA 
January 6, 1976 UMASS Worcester 




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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



December 2, 1974; 10:00 a.m. 



4467 



Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Healey, President 

Wood; Trustees Gordon, Pumphret, Rowland, Troy; Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary Hardy, Mr. Mehegan 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Lynton, Vice 
President Edelman, Mr. O'Leary 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Soutter, Mr. Stockwell, 
Dr. Wheeler 



The meeting was called to order at 10:30 a.m. President 
Wood, at Chairman Healey 's request, began with a brief overview of 
the agenda, then asked Vice President Edelman to present the 
Group Practice Regulations (Doc. T75-065) to the Committee for 
discussion. Mr. Edelman sketched the development of the Group 
Practice Plan, citing researches of the President's Office and 
consultations with the faculty and administration of the Medical 
School. He recalled that the University had decided that special 
legislative authorization of the plan was needed. This authorizatior 
had been signed by Governor Sargent in August 1974, and details of 
the rules and regulations of the plan had been under development 
and discussion throughout the fall. 



'■ : ■'■ ' . " 



UM/ Worcester — 
Group Practice 
Regulations 
(Doc. T75-065) 



He told the Committee that a final set of rules and regula 
tions was not ready, and that the President was therefore presenting 
a set of interim guidelines for adoption at this time. He said he 
hoped to see a completed final draft by no later than July 1, 1975, 
and preferably sooner. 

The reason for the interim guidelines, Mr. Edelman 
explained, is that if some guidelines were not soon in operation, 
faculty members could not be paid salaries in excess of state 
ceilings without danger of violation of the state conflict-of- 
interest law. 

Mr. Edelman sketched the tripartite compensation outline 
of the Group Practice Plan: each member's compensation would con- 
sist of (1) a state salary not to exceed statutory ceilings, (2) 
a group practice guarantee over and above the state salary, and 



4 4 68 

Exec. Comm. 
12-2-74 

UM/Worc ester — 
Group Practice 
Regulations 
(Doc. T75-065) 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

(3) an earned incentive portion. Though the three parts may add 
up to large sums, he said, the total was likely to be less than 
that which might be earned in private practice. Mr. Edelman said 
that, although statute allowed the state salaries of chairmen to 
be "overscale," every effort should be made to keep these salaries 
below the scale limit. The number of "overscale" appointments on 
state salaries could be kept to a minimum by utilizing the tri- 
partite compensation plan of group practice. 

Mr. Edelman pointed out that the fees from clinical 
practice would not initially generate sufficient income to cover 
commitments. Chancellor Soutter said that fees presently earned 
by clinical faculty would be available for the Group Practice Trust 
Fund, and FY 74 and FY 75 Health Professions Capitation grant funds 
are also in hand for this purpose. Mr. Edelman was optimistic 
about Congress passing FY 76 capitation grants, in which case an 
additional $300,000 might be received by the Medical School. 
However, if alternative additional funds should be needed to meet 
Group Practice commitments, the Board would be asked to consider 
borrowing from other University Trust Funds, which would be 
permissible if it was clearly stipulated as a loan to be repaid. 

Discussion followed about the problems and issues 
involved in financing the Group Practice Plan in this initial 
period. 

Chairman Healey laid stress on the need for the Board to 
be kept abreast of the status of the Plan and its finances at all 
stages. He said a constant reviewing process is imperative, and 
emphasized that the Board should be on top of projected commitments 
and their funding aspects at all times. Mr. Stockwell suggested 
that the Medical School make an initial report and subsequent 
reports to the Board on the fifteenth of each month, about the 
situation of the preceding 30 days. The Chairman and the President 
endorsed this idea. 

Mr. Edelman emphasized the need periodically to renego- 
tiate the mix of the tripartite compensation package. He said 
that while the total compensation would remain the same, the 
salary would come down as the fringe benefit package increases. 

Mr. Edelman observed that the prospective financial 
position of the Group Practice Plan would be favorable in comparison 
to others of its type. He concluded his discussion with a request 
for certain amendments to Document T75-065, which were duly made. 



seconded, 



There being no objection, it was accordingly moved, 
and 



VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
approve and adopt the Interim Guidelines for 
the University of Massachusetts Medical School 
Group Practice as attached to Trustee Document 
T75-065. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
authorize the Treasurer of the University to 
establish a University of Massachusetts Medical 
School Group Practice Trust Fund in accordance 
with Chapter 733 of the Acts of 1974 and Univer- 
sity policy, disbursements from said fund to be 
in accordance with the Interim Guidelines for 
the Group Practice (Trustee Doc. T75-065) . 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
authorize the transfer of the funds provided 
by the Health Professions Capitation grant from 
the U.S. Department of Health, Education and 
Welfare into the University of Massachusetts 
Medical School Group Practice Trust Fund, said 
money to be expended in accordance with the 
Interim Guidelines for the Group Practice. 
(Trustee Doc. T75-065) 

The Chairman next directed the Committee's attention to 
faculty appointments at the Medical School. Vice President Lynton 
said that the Committee had before it two lists which constituted 
all appointments but one made so far this fiscal year where total 
salary was greater than the State maximum as well as all new appoint- 
ments which had been reviewed and recommended by the F & EP Com- 
mittee. He called attention to two characteristics. First, he said, 
the total salary is equal to the total compensation because as yet 
the fringe benefits are minimal. As Mr. Edelman had explained 
earlier in the discussion about the Group Practice guidelines, the 
salary and its components would be renegotiated within the same 
total compensation. All compensation details would be subject to 
renegotiation on or before July 1, 1975. 

Secondly, he continued, prior to the opening of the 
Teaching Hospital, the clinical income of faculty members will be 
severely limited. These recommendations allow a temporary guarantee 
of that portion of the salary which in due time can be expected to 
derive from earned overage. In most cases, added Dr. Lynton, the 
state share of the salary has been kept to or below the state 
salary maximum. Chairman Healey commented that it would be a great 
day when the salaries of clinical faculty can be within a state 
scale and they can earn the rest of their compensation from clinical 
practice fees through the Group Practice Plan. 

President Wood also placed before the Committee, Position 
Classifications for Radiation Technician and Administrative Clinical 
Dietician. Mr. Edelman explained that with the start-up of the new 
Teaching Hospital there is need for certain necessary functions to 
be carried out, which do not presently exist as positions. 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was 



4 4 69 

Exec. Comm. 
12-2-74 

UM/Worc ester — 
Group Practice 
Regulations 
(Doc. T75-065) 



Personnel 
Actions 
(Docs. T75-068 
and T75-069) 



Classification 

of Position 

Titles 

(Doc. T75-070) 



4 4 70 

Exec. Comm. 
12-2-74 

Classification 

of Position 

Titles 

(Doc. T75-070) 

COMMITTEE 



VOTED : 



And it was 



VOTED 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
ratify the appointments, with the dates specified, 
as set forth in Trustee Document T75-068 and 
approve the components of compensation as set 
forth in said document, said components to be 
renegotiated and submitted to the Board of 
Trustees for its approval not later than 
July 1, 1975; further, that the Board of Trustees 
authorize the preparation and filing of any 
documents necessary for the implementation of 
this vote. 



To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
approve the prospective appointments and terms 
of employment as set forth in Trustee Document 
T75-069, said stated components of compensation 
to be renegotiated and submitted to the Board 
of Trustees for its approval not later than 
July 1, 1975; further, that the Board of Trustees 
authorize preparation and filing of any documents 
necessary for its implementation of this vote. 



It was also 



VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the classification of two position titles as 
set forth in Trustee Document T75-070. 

And it was further 



VOTED 



And finally 



VOTED: 



That the Classification of Position Titles under 
the Provision of Chapter 648 of the Acts of 1962 
shall be fixed in a weekly salary range from a 
minimum to a maximum or fixed at a specific 
weekly salary rate which shall not be changed 
except by vote of the Board of Trustees and such 
classification shall not be designated by any 
job group number or grade. 



That, in accordance with the Provisions of Chapter 
648 of the Acts of 1962, the position titles in 
the Professional Staff detailed in Doc. T75-070 
are classified as weekly salary rates specified 
after the titles of positions in the following 
schedule subject to subsequently being amended, 
revised, added to, or repealed by the Board of 
Trustees under the Provisions of said Chapter 648. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Committee next turned, at the request of the President 
to the fourth item on the agenda, Executive Compensation, Salary and 
Position Classification Study. He informed the Committee that last 



February he had established a Management Task Force on University 
Organization, to study and recommend ways to achieve a more 
effective, economical and efficient administrative posture for the 
University. Father Michael Walsh, Academic Advisor to the President 
is Chairman of this Task Force, and it is proceeding with the review 
of organization and reorganization of the Amherst, Boston and 
Worcester campuses as to the comparability and appropriateness of 
structure, position classification, salary and compensation. 

He had asked Treasurer Johnson to take the lead in 
specifically looking into approximately the top 100 or so adminis- 
trative positions in the University, comparing equity of compensa- 
tions, salaries and position titles among campuses, and between 
campuses and President's Office. Assistant Vice President Peter 
Kaplan and the Personnel Office are coordinating the longer-range 
study of the total administrative personnel picture. 

Treasurer Johnson commented that similar reviews of this 
kind have occurred over the years as internal efforts. He felt now 
that an outside consultative study on this matter would be highly 
desireable, and suggested several firms with experience in this 
area. President Wood mentioned that a recent survey of comparable 
universities around the country with respect to their executive 
compensation and salary patterns indicated that the University 
stood in about the middle of the spectrum. 

Treasurer Johnson said that the University does not have 
funds for a comprehensive compensation study. He did not know the 
cost of a study such as he was proposing in the draft scope of work 
statement which was distributed to the members of the Committee, 
but he said he would hope it could be done in 90 days. Chairman 
Healey proposed that the Committee review the draft of the scope 
of work and authorize the President to retain a consulting firm to 
conduct the study. Other members of the Committee supported this 
and it was 

VOTED : To authorize the President to engage a consulting 
firm to make an executive compensation, salary 
and position classification study and plan for the 
University to report thereon to the Trustee 
Executive Committee. 

The Chairman turned next to the matter of the Search Com - 
mittee for Dean, University of Massachusetts at Worcester (Doc. T75- 
066) . President Wood informed the Committee that he and Chancellor 
Soutter both believe in the need to establish a search committee 
and begin the search for a new Dean for the Medical School who will 
most likely later be the Chancellor. He said that consistent with 



4471 

Exec. Comm. 
12-2-74 

Executive 

Compensation, 

Salary and 

Position 

Classification 

Study 



UM/Worc ester — 

Search for Dean 

of Medical 

School 

(Doc. T75-066) 



4472 

Exec. Comm. 
12-2-74 

UM/Wo re ester — 
Search for Dean 
of Medical 
School 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the Statement on University Governance, the proposed composition 
of the committee include students as well as faculty and in 
recognition of the specialized mission of the Medical School and 
its relationship to other institutions and the community it is 
proposed that membership on the search committee include two 
people from outside the University community. 

Chancellor Soutter expressed his agreement with the 
President on the desirability of having students as well as out- 
siders on the search committee. The Chancellor then questioned the 
appropriateness of the dates indicated in the Charge to the search 
committee. He announced $$hat he had accepted the position of 
President-elect of the National Easter Seal Society and that he 
would like to retire from the University on January 1, 1976, insteac 
of July 1976 in order to assume the Presidency at that time. He 
therefore suggested that the arrival of the new dean be postponed 
to January, 1976. 

Chairman Healey suggested appointment of a new Dean to 
take office in July 1975, while Dr. Soutter was still serving out 
his tenure as Chancellor, might be beneficial to the Medical 
School. He said a new Dean should immediately upon taking office 
assume a heavy administrative load and work with the Chancellor, 
thus providing lead time for a smooth transition. Chancellor 
Soutter voiced no objection to this idea and Trustee Gordon agreed 
that such a plan of having a new Dean in office six months before 
Dr. Soutter 's retirement might well assist the transition. 

At the request of the Chairman, the proposed vote was 
adjusted to clarify the Committee's intent that the new dean would 
indeed become Chancellor and also that the President should submit 
four instead of three nominations for the outside membership. 
There being no objection, and upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that a 

Search Committee be established to consider and 
make recommendations to the President and the 
Board of Trustees for the appointment of a Dean 
who will later be Chancellor and Dean for the 
University of Massachusetts Medical School at 
Worcester; this Committee to be composed of four 
members of the faculty of the Medical School; 
one student; two members from outside the Univer- 
sity community of professional distinction in 
medical education, health affairs, or leadership 
in higher education; and two Trustees. The 
Committee will be appointed by the Board. At 
least six nominations for faculty membership shall 
be submitted by the faculty of the Medical School 
as a whole; at least two nominations for student 
membership shall be submitted by the student body; 
and at least four nominations for outside member- 
ship shall be submitted by the President. 



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COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The procedure to be followed by the Committee shall 
be determined by the Committee subject to the 
approval of the President and the Board of Trustees, 

The Committee went into executive session at 11:40 a.m. 
and adjourned at 12:15 p.m. 



01adys(JCeith Hardy » 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4473 

Exec. Comm. 
12-2-74 

UM/Worc ester — 
Search for Dean 
of Medical 
School 



4 4 74 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Worcester 
Search Com- 
mittee for Dean 
(Doc. T75-066A) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF SPECIAL MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

December 4, 1974 

Room 105 
Campus Center 
University of Massachusetts at Amherst 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Healey, President 
Wood; Trustees Croce, Gordon, Pumphret, Rowland, Shaler, 
Troy, Weldon; Secretary Hardy, Mr. Mehegan 



The meeting was called to order at 4:10 p.m. 

The Chairman explained that he had called the meeting 
to propose a change in the procedures to be followed in the 
selection of a Search Committee for a Dean of the Medical School 
(Doc. T75-0J§6A). He pointed out that the next full meeting of the 
Board would not take place for two months, in February 1975, and 
that it would be highly desirable for the search committee to begin 
work expeditiously. He therefore proposed that the Board authorize 
the Executive Committee to select the members of the search commit- 
tee. He added that Chancellor Soutter had asked that the date of 
his retirement be changed from July 1976 to January 1976, thereby 
making it even more important for a committee to go to work soon. 

He also asked the Executive Committee to recommend that 
the search committee be empowered to devise its procedures subject 
to the approval of the President, without prior reference to the 
Board of Trustees. 

There was no objection, and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that a 
Search Committee be established to consider 
and make recommendations to the President and 
the Board of Trustees for the appointment of 
a Dean who will later be Chancellor and Dean 
for the University of Massachusetts Medical 
School at Worcester; that this Committee be 
composed of four members of the faculty of 
the Medical School, one student, two members 
from outside the University community of pro- 
fessional distinction in medical education, 
health affairs, or leadership in higher educa- 
tion, and two Trustees; that at least six 
nominations for faculty membership shall be 
submitted by the faculty of the Medical 
School as a whole; at least two nominations 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

for student membership shall be submitted by 
the student body at the Worcester campus; and 
at least four nominations for outside member- 
ship shall be submitted by the President; that 
the Chairman of the Board be and hereby is 
authorized to designate the two Trustees for 
membership on the Committee; and that the 
Executive Committee be and hereby is authorized 
to select the members of the Search Committee 
from among said nominees. 

The procedure to be followed by the Search 
Committee shall be determined by the Committee 
subject to the approval of the President. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:21 p.m. 



4 4 75 

Exec. Comm. 
12-4-74 



UM/Worcester — 
Search Committee 
for Dean 
(Doc. T75-066A) 



£fl.adys (kei 



th Hardy * 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4 4 76 



COMMITTEE 



UM/ Wore ester — 
Search Committee 
for Dean of 
Medical School 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

December 17, 1974; 10:00 a.m. 

Office of the President, University of Massachusetts 
One Washington Mall, Boston, Massachusetts 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Healey, President 
Wood; Trustees Gordon, Pumphret, Shaler, Troy, Secretary 
Hardy 



The meeting was called to order by Chairman Healey at 



11:10 a.m. 



Faculty 
Nominations 



Chairman Healey invited President Wood to review the 
status of nominations from various constituencies concerned with 
the formation of a search committee for a Dean of the Medical 
School, later to be Chancellor of UM/Worcester , as voted by the 
Board of Trustees at its meeting on December 4, 1974. 

President Wood said that, in a letter from Chancellor 
Soutter, he was informed that the Executive Committee of the 
Medical School Faculty had met and decided to recommend the 
following types of individuals for the six faculty nominations: 
two chairmen of preclinical departments, two of clinical depart- 
ments, one physician representing voluntary and part-time faculty, 
and one member of the full-time faculty below the level of chair- 
man. The general faculty wanted to name its own representative 
and had not yet met. President Wood asked the Committee if it 
favored a junior faculty member as one of the four faculty repre- 
sentatives on the Search Committee. A brief discussion led to 
unanimous assent to having a representative of the general faculty 

The other five faculty nominations were: 

Dr. Neal C. Brown, Professor and Chairman 
of the Department of Pharmacology 

Dr. Donald J. Tipper, Professor and Chairman 
of the Department of Microbiology 

Dr. Robert B. Hickler, Professor and Chairman 
of the Department of Medicine 

Dr. Hugh S. Fulmer, Professor and Chairman 
of the Department of Community and 
Family Medicine 

Dr. Edward Mason (voluntary and part-time 
faculty member) , Head of Psychiatry 
at the Memorial Hospital, on the Staff 
of St. Vincent's and Worcester City 
Hospitals, and Acting Chairman of the 
Medical School Department of Psychiatry 



COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Committee discussed each nominee and it was felt that 
the representation on the Search Committee should include faculty 
from both the preclinical and clinical departments. Chairman Healey 
said that because of the Medical School's particular orientation to 
Community and Family Medicine, it would be important to have Dr. 
Fulmer, Chairman of the Department of Community and Family Medicine, 
on the Search Committee. It was pointed out that Dr. Hickler's 
experience at Harvard and the Boston teaching hospitals would be 
valuable. It was felt that Dr. Brown would be an effective repre- 
sentative of the preclinical departments. 

President Wood said that since the Board action of December 
establishing the Search Committee, he had received letters from 
Helen Marie Smith, Executive Director of St. Vincent's Hospital, and 
Dr. Edward F. Kilroy, President of the Worcester District Medical 
Society. Both suggested that a representative of the Worcester 
medical community be named to the Search Committee. President Wood 
went on to say that, in consulting general counsel, he had dis- 
covered that there could be conflict-of-interest problems in having 
a staff member of another hospital on the Search Committee. 
However, he observed, it is understandable that the medical 
communities of Worcester would be interested in participating in 
the search for the new Dean. 

Chairman Healey had previously appointed Trustees Croce 
and Abrams as the Trustee representatives on the Search Committee. 
It was pointed out that Dr. Croce could, in many respects, represent 
the views of the Worcester medical community. President Wood also 
said the procedures of the Search Committee would most certainly 
include consultative mechanisms with the Worcester medical community 
throughout the Committee's work. 

Chairman Healey then invited President Wood to submit 
nominations for two additional members of the Search Committee. 
The President reminded the Committee that its vote establishing 
the Search Committee had stated that the two members from outside 
the University should be of professional distinction in medical 
education, health affairs, or leadership in higher education. With 
that charge in mind he was presenting six names, three of whom repre- 
sented leadership in higher education. The other three persons are 
distinguished in medical education and health affairs. In the 
category of higher education, Dr. Wood listed the following: 

Dr. George Hazzard, President of Worcester 
Polytechnic Institute 

Dr. Jacquelyn Mattfeld, Dean of Faculty and 
Vice Provost of Brown University 

Dr. H. Lawrence McCrory, Associate Academic 
Vice President of the University of 
Vermont and formerly on the faculty of 
the University of Illinois Medical College 



4477 

Exec. Comm. 
12-17-74 

UM/Worcester — 7 
Search Committee 
for Dean of 
Medical School 



Trustees 
Appointed by 
Chairman Healey 
to Search 
Committee 



Nominations by 
the President 



4 4 78 



Exec. Comm. 
12-17-74 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Nominations by 
the President 
for Search 
Committee for 
Dean of COMMITTEE 
Medical School 



In the category of medical education and health affairs, Dr. Wood 
listed: 

Dr. Leona Baumgartner, Visiting Professor of 
Social Medicine at the Harvard Medical 
School and Executive Director of the 
Medical Care and Education Foundation; 
former New York City Commissioner of 
Health 

Dr. Howard Hiatt, Dean of the Harvard School 
of Public Health and Physician-in-Chief 
of Beth Israel Hospital 

Dr. Louis W. Sullivan, Professor of Medicine 
at Boston University Medical School 



In discussing these nominations, the Committee felt that 
Dr. Hazzard, a strong advocate of improved public and private 
institutional relationships, would be a distinguished member of 
the Search Committee. The Committee noted that Dr. Leona Baum- 
gartner, who was a recipient of an Honorary Degree from the Univer- 
sity, and is currently an active member of the University's 
Trustee Council, is a distinguished woman in the field of health 
and medical education. It was felt that she also would be an 
excellent outside member on the Search Committee. 



There being no futher discussion of the nominations, 



it was 



Student Nomina- 
tions to Search 
Committee 



VOTED : As authorized by the Board of Trustees on 
December 4, 1974, the Executive Committee 
selects the following faculty to be members 
of the Search Committee for Dean of Medical 
School: Dr. Neal C. Brown, Dr. Hugh S. 
Fulmer, Dr. Roger B. Hickler, and a member 
of the general faculty to be identified sub- 
sequently; and the following persons from 
outside the University community as members 
of the Search Committee for Dean of Medical 
School: Dr. George Hazzard and Dr. Leona 
Baumgartner . 

President Wood further informed the Committee that 
Chancellor Soutter had asked the students of the first-, second- and 
third-year classes of the Medical School to nominate one repre- 
sentative of each class for membership on the Search Committee. 
Due to the schedules of the students, they had not yet met to 
nominate their representatives. The Committee agreed that the 
Secretary should be authorized to poll the members of the Executive 
Committee once information is received about the student nominees 
from Chancellor Soutter. It was 



COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : That the Secretary of the Board hereby is 

authorized to poll the available members of 
the Executive Committee with respect to their 
selection of one student for membership on the 
Search Committee for Dean of Medical School 
from among student nominees of the Medical School. 

Members of the Committee expressed the hope that, after 
the final selection of a student member and the identification of 
the junior faculty member, the Search Committee could proceed with 
its work early in January. It was recalled that the vote of the 
Board of Trustees on December 4 included the stipulation that "The 
procedure to be followed by the Search Committee shall be determined 
by the Committee subject to the approval of the President." Chairman 
Healey said that he would like to see the Search Committee recommend 
three candidates for submission to the full Board. President Wood 
said he would convey this to the Committee and added that he hoped 
the first meeting of the Search Committee would occur within the 
first two weeks of January. There being no further business, the 
Committee adjourned at 12:05 p.m. 



4 4 79 



Exec. Comm. 
11-17-74 

Student Nomina- 
tions to Search 
Committee for 
Dean of the 
Medical School 



(kiadys Aeith Hardy VJ 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



Note: Addendum attached. 



4 4 80 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



ADDENDUM 
TO 
MINUTES OF DECEMBER 17, 1974, MEETING 

HELD AT 
OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
ONE WASHINGTON MALL, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



On December 
President Wood submitt 
Committee selection of 
Committee. Chancellor 
the Executive Committe 
Hardy completed the te 
Committee. The studen 
second-year class. Dr 
representative of the 



23, Chancellor Soutter in a letter to 
ed the names of three students for Executive 
one student representative on the Search 
Soutter 's letter was mailed to members of 
e and on January 3 and 6, 1975, Secretary 
lephone poll of all members of the Executive 
t selected is Miss Mary Mo-Yung Tse of the 
. Karl J. Hittelman was selected as the 
general faculty. 



I 







4 481 




UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 




1 


MINUTES OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT AFFAIRS 
December 17, 1974; 1:00 p.m. 


T 


COMMITTEE 


Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff: Chairman Shaler, President 
Wood; Trustees Abrams and Rowland; Mr. Mehegan 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests: 

Office of the President: Vice President Lynton, Dr. 
Gartenberg, Dr. Keith, Mr. Searson, Mr. O'Leary, Mr. Lewis, 
Mr. Cahill 

UM/Amherst: Chancellor Bromery , Dr. Gage, Dr. Tillona, 
Director of Commuters Helen Hill, Graduate Student 
Senate President Lindsey 

UM/Boston: Chancellor Golino, Vice Chancellor Hamilton, 






Mr. Tubbs, Mr. Vannicelli, Ms. Furman, Ms. Kelly 




1 


UM/Worcester : Chancellor Soutter, Dr. Saunders, Dr. 




II 


Smith 






The meeting was called to order at 1:00 p.m. Chairman 


UM/Amherst & 




Shaler called on Mr. Searson, University General Counsel, to 


UM/Boston — 




address the first agenda item, University Day Care Centers. Mr. 


Day Care Reports 




Searson informed the Committee that he had read the documents per- 






taining to the item and proceeded to discuss possible legal problems 






that might arise. 






Helen Hill, Director of Commuters, said that North Village 






was currently up for review and that it was expected to meet 






applicable standards in January or February. Dr. Gage sketched 






the history of day care on the campus, and said an effort was under- 






way to gather each of the several centers into a coherent system 






which could meet state standards. 






Chairman Shaler, citing a statement in the report of the 






Amherst campus, asked why the Third World and New World centers had 






refused to enter the University day care system. He then asked 






whether the price of day care might have limited the use which 






clients might otherwise make of it. 




II 


Dr. Gage answered that the Third World and New World 




1 


centers were spontaneous, volunteer-oriented projects which were 


1 



4 4 8a 

Stu. Affairs 
12/17/74 

UM/ Amherst & 

UM/Boston — 

Day Care Reports 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

not yet reconciled to the structure and standards of University 
affiliation. He added that they received no University funds and 
were simply allowed to use lounges in two residence halls. Dr. 
Gage also said that he felt confident that there was no need for 
further expansion of day care services, and that anyone on campus 
in need was obtaining such services. Ms. Hill added that some 
parents had actually requested that prices be raised. 

Chairman Shaler asked for the report of the Boston 
Campus. Sara Kelly, Director of Day Care, described the program, 
and stressed that, unlike the Amherst campus, the Harbor Campus 
had a crying need for more services but that a lack of funds had 
made it impossible to expand. It might even be necessary, she 
said, for the centers to raise their fees, which might force some 
students to drop out of school. 

Chairman Shaler asked Chancellor Golino and Vice Chan- 
cellor Tubbs to explain their long-range plans for solving the 
problems of day care on the Harbor Campus. Both stressed the 
two priorities of tying the day care program to academic programs 
without allowing day care to become a guinea pig, and of securing 
sufficient funds to meet the demonstrated needs for day care on 
the campus. The campus's commitment is clear, the Chancellor 
said, but the scale of the services is not. 

Ms. Kelly said the program wished to involve the 
resources of the academic departments, and said the program's 
view was that an academic component to University day care would 
involve many academic departments, not just the Department of 
Education. Overtures had been made to the mathematics and foreign 
languages departments, she said, in an effort to elicit their 
participation in the day care program. 

Chancellor Golino described a problem encountered in 
seeking an academic component. Often the academic departments 
were interested in participating, but their aims and purposes 
were occasionally at variance with those of the program. 

Further discussion ensued about the relation of the 
Harbor Campus program to Project Head Start and to the Department 
of Public Welfare. Trustee Abrams asked for more information about 
the relations, desired and undesired, with the academic depart- 
ments. Chancellor Bromery explained that the day care programs 
should not be manipulated for the purposes of the academic programs. 
Ms. Furman stated that the type of participation envisioned by the 
Psychology Department, as an example, was not compatible with the 
aims of the day care program, and said that experimentation with 
the children should not be allowed. 

Trustee Abrams said he found this attitude disappointing, 
that contact between academic professionals such as psychologists 
and children is not bad for children, and that experimentation is 



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COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

not per se a bad thing. Ms. Kelly added that part of the resistance 
to this role for the Psychology Department was coming from parents, 
to which Dr. Abrams replied that there should be a meeting of minds 
between parents and psychologists, if that is the case, to work out 
an accommodation between them. 

Vice President Lynton remarked that there was a funda- 
mental discrepancy between the aims of a research program and the 
aims of a child care center, and said that the purposes of the day 
care program should take precedence. 

Chairman Shaler concluded the discussion by asking Counsel 
Searson to provide the Committee with a written report dealing with 
the legal issues of University day care for its consideration at 
its next meeting. 

The next item on the agenda was the Report on Tuition 
Waiver Policies at the University of Massachusetts. Dr. Keith 
reported to the Committee that he had undertaken a review of tuition 
waiver policies at the request of the President. He observed that 
there had been 25 Board votes on this matter since the first tuition 
waiver in 1912, and that waiver policy had been administered by 
"pushcart" — without central coordination. He described the 
categories of waivers granted, the amounts waived, and the portion 
of the whole they composed. In the academic year 1973-74, he said, 
the University had waived $2.3 million in tuition. 

As a result of the study, Dr. Keith recommended that the 
numerous de facto categories of waivers be replaced by three basic 
ones: (1) Compensation for services rendered, (2) financial aid, 
and (3) courtesy, such as in reciprocal arrangements with other 
institutions, or for University staff. 

There followed discussion about several provisions of 
Document T75-075. Concern was expressed that the proposed abolition 
of tuition waivers of residence hall counselors (Section 3.5) might 
serve to undermine a valuable service. It was agreed that Section 
3.5 would be tabled and discussed at the Committee's next meeting. 
It was also agreed that Section 3.3, dealing with waivers for 
"fellowship recipients," might profitably bear alteration at that 
time, since the words "fellowship" and "scholarship" are used 
differently at Worcester than at the other campuses. There were 
several other word changes. 

Chancellor Soutter expressed the view that the document 
completely excluded the needs of the Medical School. The Medical 
School, he said, needed more money for financial aid to its stu- 
dents, but that such funds were decreasing. He added that the 
Medical School has some minority students, but because of a lack of 
scholarship money like that available to Boston and Amherst, the 
number of minority students cannot be increased, despite the long- 
standing commitment of the school to that end. Dr. Saunders and 



4483 



Stu. Affairs 
12-17-74 

UM/Amherst & 

UM/Boston — 

Day Care Reports 



Report on 

Tuition Waivers 

Policy 

(Docs. T75-072 

and T75-075) 



4 484 

Stu. Affairs 
12-17-74 

Report on 

Tuition Waivers 

Policy 

(Docs. T75-072 

and COMMITTEE 

T75-075) 



Discussion of 

Counseling 

Programs 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dr. Smith enlarged on his remarks, Dr. Saunders describing the 
state of indebtedness of many of the medical students and the 
degree to which they must rely on loans, and Dr. Smith describing 
the difficulty of carrying out a commitment to the admission of 
minority students without the financial resources to support it. 
Dr. Soutter stated that without more funds for minority students, 
the minority admission program will collapse. 

Discussion followed about the funds available for 
scholarships. Dr. Gartenberg mentioned the possibility of work/ 
study funds available to medical students. Chancellor Soutter 
emphasized that time is a critical factor: unlike undergraduate 
students, he said, medical students have very little time to use 
for a work/study program. 

Chairman Shaler noted the serious plight of the Medical 
School in this respect, and said he wished the Committee to discuss 
it further at its next meeting with the intention of exploring 
possible solutions. It should be a top priority, he said. 
Trustee Abrams added that it would be a shame for students who had 
entered medical school to be forced to drop out for lack of funds. 

There was no further discussion, and upon motion made 
and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Committee on Finance that it 
recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the REPORT ON TUITION WAIVER POLICIES AT THE 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS (Doc. T75-072) and 
adopt the Tuition Waiver Policies as set forth 
in Trustee Document T75-075 as amended, which 
policies are based upon the recommendations con- 
tained in said Report. 

Chairman Shaler next directed the attention of the 
Committee to the continuation of discussion of University counseling 
programs. He asked Dr. Gage if he had anything to add to his 
report at the November meeting. Dr. Gage said he would wait for 
the February meeting to make a full report. 

Chancellor Golino spoke next, and indicated that his 
report would be oral. He recapitulated the request of the Committee 
at its last meeting that he find out what had happened to the 30 
counseling and advising positions authorized and funded in the 
FY 1974 Maintenance Budget. He explained that the Student Affairs 
staff at the Boston campus stood at 27 positions prior to prepara- 
tion of the FY 1974 budget. The FY 1974 budget authorized and 
funded 30 additional positions, which raised the total staff to 
57. Of the 30, he said, 29 and one-half were allocated to Student 
Affairs. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

He gave the following breakdown of the 30 positions. 
Sixteen were allocated to student affairs professional positions, 
10 and one-half to Student Affairs clerical, two to affirmative 
action professional positions, one to affirmative action clerical, 
and one-half to other activities. Through trust funds and other 
sources, he said, Student Affairs positions had been supplemented 
somewhat, which he said would be fully reported at the February 
meeting. At President Wood's request, Vice Chancellor for Student 
Affairs Tubbs gave a further breakdown of the assignment of the 30 
professional positions out of the 57. 

Chairman Shaler asked whether there had been any 
redefinition of Student Affairs since the appointment of Vice Chan- 
cellor Tubbs. Chancellor Golino observed that counseling is done 
at the college level, and that up until Vice Chancellor Tubbs' s 
appointment, there had been no central organization. He said an 
effort was underway to set up such a central control system without 
destroying the college-level counseling operation. He said that 
streamlining is principally what is needed. 

Further discussion took place, during which President 
Wood made the observation that there was about one counselor on 
the college level for every 600 students at the Harbor Campus. 

Chairman Shaler said that he had asked for a written 
report on this matter to be provided in advance of the present 
meeting, so that he and the other members of the Committee might 
have time in which to digest it. He regretted that this had not 
been possible, he said, and asked Chancellor Golino that such be 
done well in advance of the Committee's February meeting. 

The attention of the Committee was next drawn to the 
final item, the Proposed Amendment of Vote Establishing Commencement 
Fund (Doc. T75-073) . Dr. Gage explained to the Committee that a 
long-standing concern had been felt in the Student Affairs office 
that counseling and career placement activities be considered a 
continuum throughout high school, college years, and beyond. The 
present proposal would allow the residue from the commencement fund 
to be used for these activities in the interest of graduates. 
President Wood expressed his support for the item, and said that 
Counsel Searson had no objection. 

The Chairman asked how the proposal had originated. 
Chancellor Bromery said that it had been originally proposed by the 
students and that, though it was not a primary responsibility item, 
it had been passed by a vote of the Student Senate. 

President Wood said he wished to state for the record 
that when any matter concerning the campuses comes before the Board, 
he holds the Chancellors responsible that the governance procedure 
has been properly followed. 



4485 

Stu. Affairs 
12-17-74 

Discussion of 

Counseling 

Programs 



UM/Amherst — 
Proposed Amend- 
ment of Vote 
Establishing 
Commencement 
Trust Fund 
(Doc. T75-073) 



4486 



Stu. Affairs 
12-17-74 

UM/Amherst — 
Proposed Amend- 
ment of Vote 
Establishing 

Com- COMMITTEE 

mencement Trust 

Fund 

(Doc. T75-073) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Abrams asked if students would have any control 
over how the funds would be used, and was told that, though actual 
disbursement would be handled by the Student Affairs Office, it was 
that office's long-standing policy not to make decisions without 
consultation with students. To Trustee Abram's suggestion that a 
provision calling specifically for such consultation be added to 
the vote, Dr. Gage remarked that such a qualification would be 
unique among votes of this kind. 

There being no further discussion, and a motion having 
been made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Finance Committee that 
it recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
it amend its vote of November 21, 1966, 
creating a Commencement Fund, to read, in 
its entirety, as follows: 

To establish the policy of placing the 
expense of commencement exercises and 
related events on a self-supporting 
basis through the establishment of a 
Commencement Fee of ten dollars ($10.00) 
to be assessed all students in the fall 
semester of their final academic year or 
at the beginning of the last semester or 
term prior to receiving a degree and to 
authorize the establishment of a trust 
fund entitled "Commencement Fund" as a 
depository for said fees. Further, to 
authorize the expenditure of said funds 
for commencement exercises and related 
events, as well as for such other self- 
supporting activities or services for the 
benefit of graduating students or 
students who have graduated from the 
University of Massachusetts at Amherst; 
provided, however, that fees collected 
prior to February 5, 1975, shall be 
expended only for the purposes for which 
the funds were collected. 

Trustee Abrams abstained from the vote on the grounds 
that language assuring student involvement in decisions about 
use should have been incorporated. 

There being no further business to come before the 
Committee, the meeting was adjourned at 3:40 p.m. 



t3Ladys0Kei 



l^g.TT 



th Hardy 6 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

December 17, 1974; 4:00 p.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Gordon, President 
Wood; Trustees Pumphret, Rowland, Shaler; Treasurer 
Johnson, Miss Eichel 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Lynton, Dr. 
Keith, Mr. Lewis, Mr. O'Leary 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery, Vice Chancellor Gage, 
Dr. Tillona, Graduate Student Senate Representative 
Lindsey 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino, Vice Chancellor Hamilton 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor Soutter, Mr. Cathey 

Invited Guest : Mr. Joseph H. Albert, Insurance 
Consultant 



The meeting was called to order at 4:07 p.m. by Chairman 
Gordon, who invited Mr. Joseph H. Albert, Insurance Consultant, to 
review for the Committee the highlights of the proposed compre- 
hensive liability insurance coverage outlined in the University 
of Massachusetts Invitation to Bidders and attached Specifications 
(Doc. T75-071) . Mr. Albert explained that in the past the Univer- 
sity had purchased separate insurance policies to cover some 
limited types of risks, such as liability connected with false 
arrest, radio broadcasts, the sale of alcoholic beverages, etc. 
This partial and piecemeal insurance coverage, he said, did not 
give the University adequate protection, and he had therefore 
been charged by the Committee on Finance to determine what the 
various types of exposure were and to develop a program which 
would include coverage for these areas, including coverage for 
Trustees, under one comprehensive liability policy. He stated 
that he is requesting the approval of the Committee to entertain 
bids on such a comprehensive policy, bids to be returned by 
February 12, with Committee action to be taken at its February 
meeting. 

Mr. Albert stated that in addition to publicly adver- 
tising for bids, he will encourage a list of major firms to submit 



4487 



Proposal for 

University-wide 

Comprehensive 

Liability 

Insurance 

Coverage 

(Doc. T75-071) 






4 488 



Finance Comm. 
12-17-74 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Proposal for 
University-wide 
Comprehensive 
Liability 

COMMITTEE 

Insurance 
Coverage 
(Doc. T75-071) 



proposals. Other firms will be provided with specifications upon 
request. Mr. Albert explained that this program was designed to 
cover all personnel in the employ of the University, Top of the 
Campus, Trustees, Officers, etc. The University itself, including 
the Medical School, but not physicians, nurses, etc., will be the 
subject of a separate quotation. Heretofore, Mr. Albert said, 
neither the University nor the Commonwealth had been insured. He 
added that copies of the bidder's policy or policies must be 
included in the bid. 



Mr. Albert called attention to the fact that medical 
malpractice insurance was not included in this proposal, since this 
type of insurance is specialized and would limit the number of 
bidders who could comply with the specifications. Moreover, he 
informed the Committee, malpractice insurance is becoming increas- 
ingly difficult to obtain. Mr. Albert explained that doctors and 
registered nurses at the Health Center at UM/Amherst purchase 
their own malpractice insurance. 

Mr. Albert stated that as part of the specifications the 
University had had to indicate the amount and type of exposure to 
be anticipated, and indicated that the record of the University in 
the past has been good. As an example of type of exposures to be 
covered, he mentioned activities such as the Marine Station of the 
University. 

Certain types of coverage, Mr. Albert explained, were not 
included, and he listed the exclusions in the bid specifications 
which the Committee examined in detail. 



Chairman Gordon asked if the policy would cover Univer- 
sity activities in other countries and Mr. Albert replied 
affirmatively . 

Trustee Pumphret asked at what point the insurance 
carrier would lose its right to handle a case, to which question 
Mr. Albert replied that the University could employ other counsel. 
However, he added the insurer would be liable only up to the point 
where he could have settled had the case not been taken out of his 
hands. Trustee Pumphret expressed his approval of the policy and 
inquired as to the estimated cost. Mr. Albert stated that he had 
given a budget figure of between $30 and $40 thousand per year 
based on a three-year contract of five million dollars with a six- 
month cancellation notice. Trustee Pumphret suggested that the 
Committee measure the current University coverage, including costs, 
against the proposed plan. He also inquired of Mr. O'Leary, the 
Assistant to the General Counsel of the University, how the Univer- 
sity fared with respect to suits against it, and how the indemnifi- 
cation legislation recently passed by the Legislature affected the 
possibility of damages being awarded against individual Trustees. 
Mr. O'Leary stated that the University had not as yet had to pay 



I 



COMMITTEE 



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1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



damages, but that several suits were currently pending. In 
addition, he indicated that his greater concern was for more 
vulnerable employees of the University, such as instructors, 
athletic directors, etc. 

Trustee Pumphret suggested that the malpractice coverage 
was a more critical issue than the liability coverage in the pro- 
posal, asking for anticipated costs and probable source of funds 
for more practical coverage. Treasurer Johnson stated that the 
money to cover the higher anticipated costs of the teaching hospital 
could not be obtained from Trust funds which is the source for 
paying for the other. Dr. Soutter stated that three types of 
malpractice risks are involved: (1) suits brought against the 
hospital; (2) suits brought against students; and (3) suits brought 
against the doctors. He said that the last risk was by far the 
greatest. He hoped that the State might provide the money for 
suits brought against the hospital, but doubted that it would pro- 
vide for the other types of risks. Chancellor Soutter offered the 
following suggestion: that the doctors continue to pay individually 
for malpractice insurance, but that all insurance be obtained from 
one carrier and at such time as the Group Practice Plan generates 
enough income to make it possible, malpractice insurance be funded 
from the Group Practice Plan. Mr. Albert informed the Committee 
that at such time as malpractice insurance becomes necessary, he 
will go to the Medical School with estimates of premium costs and 
ask if they can provide funds for this insurance. In response to 
a question, he said that the average individual premium for an 
M.D. is $3400. 

Mr. Albert pointed out that while the proposed coverage 
includes Trustees, it will not cover Trustees for medical mal- 
practice suits resulting from the operation of the Medical School 
and Teaching Hospital. However, the Trustees will be protected 
under the Commonwealth's indemnification legislation. He further 
stated that he does not advocate public bidding on the malpractice 
insurance coverage since this is such a specialized area. He 
anticipates that coverage for the doctors will be in the area of 
$250,000 and that the total package would be between $300,000 and 
$400,000. 

At the conclusion of his presentation, Mr. Albert left 
the meeting. 

Chairman Gordon asked Treasurer Johnson for his recom- 
mendation with regard to inviting bids for the comprehensive 
liability insurance. Mr. Johnson replied that he believes that the 
invitation for bids should go out, and at the time bids are 
received, the final determination can be made of the extent of 
coverage and as to how to fund the program. 

There being no further discussion, on motion made and 
seconded, it was 



4 489 

Finance Comm. 
12-17-74 

Proposal for 

University-wide 

Comprehensive 

Liability 

Insurance 

Coverage 

(Doc. T75-071) 



4 490 

Finance Comm. 
12-17-74 

Proposal for 
University-wide 
Comprehensive 
Liability 

COMMITTEE 

Insurance 
Coverage 
(Doc. T75-071) 

Report on 
Tuition Waiver 
Policies 
(Doc. T75-072) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer of the University, 
in consultation with the President, to solicit 
bids for the privilege of providing a compre- 
hensive liability insurance program in accordance 
with the Invitation to Bidders and Specifications 
set forth in Trustee Document T75-071. 

Chairman Gordon turned next to the Report on Tuition 
Waiver Policies at the University of Massachusetts (Doc. T75-072) 
and requested Dr. Keith, Associate Vice President for University 
Policy, to review the history of tuition waivers at the University. 
Dr. Keith informed the Committee that about a year and a half ago 
he had at the President's request initiated a review of all Uni- 
versity tuition waivers and procedures. He said that in order to 
determine policies and procedures, he had met with personnel on the 
campuses and had obtained both the total number of tuition waivers 
and the dollar amounts represented by these waivers, as well as the 
recommendations of the campuses for revisions to the policies and 
procedures. 

Dr. Keith stated that the first tuition waiver was 
approved by the Board of Trustees in 1912 and covered one Latin- 
American student. Since that time, he said, the Board had voted 
at least 25 times on the matter of tuition waivers. In the past, 
Dr. Keith stated, tuition had been waived by deans, department 
heads, and sometimes individual professors as well as the Provost. 

Dr. Keith summarized the various categories of tuition 
waivers presently in existence and said that the total tuition 
waived in 1973-74 academic year represents $2,320,350. Dr. Keith 
informed the Committee that no clear-cut procedures or guidelines 
had been set for the awarding of waivers since the approval of the 
first tuition waiver by the Board of Trustees in 1912, and that 
there had been broad interpretation of the various Trustee votes 
since that time. This report, he said, is an attempt to reduce the 
number of categories of tuition waivers and to establish guidelines 
and procedures for regulating such awards. The report, he said, 
recommends the establishment of three major categories of tuition 
waivers: (1) Waivers for Compensation to Teaching and Research 
Assistants and Associates; (2) Waivers for Financial Aid to 
Veterans (mandated by Statute) , Foreign Students and Fellowship 
Recipients, and (3) "Courtesy" Waivers to faculty of other state 
universities in Massachusetts; on-the-job supervisors; University 
faculty, staff, and classified employees; and reciprocal arrange- 
ments with New England institutions. 

Tuition waivers to Service Assistants, said Dr. Keith, 
would be eliminated; graduate fellows would receive waivers only 
on the basis of serious financial need, waivers for theses and 
dissertations would be awarded only for a set range of credits; 
a maximum of 10 percent of foreign students would have tuitions 
waived; and courtesy tuition waivers would be allowed on a space- 
available basis. 



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COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dr. Keith stated that if the recommendations of the 
report are adopted by the Board, the amount of tuition gained 
would be between $650,000 and $900,000. Whether or not waivers will 
be allowed in the future for residence hall counselors was tabled 
at the Student Affairs Committee meeting earlier in the day, he 
said, and will receive further discussion at the February meeting 
of the Student Affairs Committee. An area of financial aid or 
tuition waivers not addressed in the recommendations report 
regarding minority and disadvantaged students at the UM/Worcester 
Medical School will also be taken up by the Student Affairs 
Committee. 

Vice President Lynton stated that the total amount of 
tuition waivers not legislatively mandated is approximately 
$1.6 million and that the recommendations of the report could reduce 
that figure by about 40%. 

Dr. Keith concluded his remarks by calling the attention 
of the Committee to the University of Massachusetts Tuition Waiver 
Policies (Doc. T75-075A) and reading the Vote recommended by the 
Committee on Student Affairs. 

Vice Chancellor Hamilton stated that UM/Boston personnel 
endorse the report on tuition waivers and the recommended policies. 
There being no further discussion, on motion made and seconded, it 
was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
approve the REPORT ON TUITION WAIVER POLICIES 
AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS (Doc. T75-072) 
and adopt the Tuition Waiver Policies as set 
forth in Trustee Document T75-075A, which 
policies are based upon the recommendations 
contained in said Report. 

Chairman Gordon next turned to the Proposed Amendment 
of the Vote Establishing the Commencement Fund at UM/Amherst (Doc. 
T75-073) and asked Vice Chancellor Gage to explain the purpose of 
this amendment. Dr. Gage stated that the Commencement fee charged 
had heretofore been used only to cover the actual graduation 
expenses and that unexpended funds could not be used for other 
activities. He said it is the wish of the students that surplus 
monies be made available for the assistance of students and alumni 
in career development, among other things. He said that this 
proposal has the approval of the graduate and undergraduate student 
bodies and of the Commencement Task Force. Trustee Shaler said 
that the Committee on Student Affairs at their meeting had voted to 
recommend this proposed amendment to the Committee on Finance. 
There being no opposition, it was 



4491 



Finance Comm. 
12-17-74 

Report on 
Tuition Waiver 
Policies 
(Doc. T75-072) 



Tuition Waiver 

Policies 

(Doc. T75-075A) 



UM/Amherst — 
Proposed Amend- 
ment of the 
Vote Establish- 
ing the 
Commencement 
Fund 
(Doc. T75-073) 



4492 

Finance Comm. 
12-17-74 

UM/Amherst — 
Proposed Amend- 
ment of the 
Vote Establish- 
ing COMMITTEE 

the Commence- 
ment Fund 
(Doc. T75-073) 



General 

Endowment 

Funds 

(Doc. T75-074) 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
amend its vote of November 21, 1966, creating 
a Commencement Fund, to read, in its entirety, 
as follows: 

To establish the policy of placing the 
expense of commencement exercises and 
related events on a self-supporting 
basis through the establishment of a 
Commencement Fee of ten dollars ($10.00) 
to be assessed all students in the fall 
semester of their final academic year or 
at the beginning of the last semester 
or term prior to receiving a degree and 
to authorize the establishment of a 
Trust fund entitled "Commencement Fund" 
as a depository for said fees. Further, 
to authorize the expenditure of said 
funds for commencement exercises and 
related events, as well as for such other 
self-supporting activities or services 
for the benefit of graduating students 
or students who have graduated from the 
University of Massachusetts at Amherst; 
provided, however, that fees collected 
prior to February 5, 1975, shall be 
expended only for the purposes for which 
the funds were collected. 

Chairman Gordon asked Treasurer Johnson to speak to the 
last item on the agenda, the proposal for the establishment of 
General Endowment Funds (Doc. T75-074) . Mr. Johnson explained that 
this was an attempt to include gifts of less than $3,000 into one 
general fund on each campus and in the President's Office to be 
used for such purposes as the Chancellors and the President deem 
to be in the best interest of the University. Chancellor Soutter 
asked that the vote included in the document be amended to clarify 
that monies collected by a campus could be spent only by that 
campus. Mr. Johnson said that that was, indeed, the intent of the 
vote and there being no objection, it was agreed to amend the vote 
to reflect the concern of Chancellor Soutter, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees establish 
a General Endowment Fund for each campus and the 
President's Office to receive small unrestricted 
gifts and bequests not specifically identified by 
name, such funds are to be kept invested by the 
Trustees of the University of Massachusetts in 
such a manner as they determine and the President 
and the Chancellors may expend the earned income 
from their respective funds for such purposes as 
they may deem to be in the best interest of the 
University. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Johnson requested to bring to the attention of 
the Committee an item not on the agenda, but one of major importance 
to the University. He said that he has received a copy of a 
communication from the Secretary of Administration and Finance, in 
which the Secretary has asked the major banks in the area to forward 
proposals covering a new method of handling relief and payroll funds 
He said that early last fall this matter had been discussed with 
University administrators and at that time it had been agreed that 
because of the complex operations of the University, it would be 
excluded from the plan. However, he has been informed that recent 
thinking on the part of the Secretary's Office has changed and the 
University will now be included in A & F's proposal. The contem- 
plated system, said Mr. Johnson, would involve extensive repro- 
gramming of computers at Amherst and would involve hundreds of 
man hours and thousands of dollars. In addition, he said, he 
expected payroll checks would be issued by a Boston bank, which he 
felt would prove inconvenient for University personnel. He stated 
that he would keep the Committee informed of developments in this 
regard. 

There being no further business, the meeting adjourned 
at 5:35 p.m. 



((Jladyfe) Keith Hardy 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4493 

Finance Comm. 
12-17-74 

Communication 
from Adminis- 
tration and 
Finance Office 
re Relief and 
Payroll Funds 



4 4 94 



COMMITTEE 



President ' s 
Remarks 



UM/Worcester- 
Opening of 
Teaching 
Hospital 



Trustee 
Committee 
Meeting 
Schedule 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

February 5, 1975; 11:00 a.m. 

Room 311 
Administration Building 
University of Massachusetts at Boston 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Healey, President 
Wood; Trustees Gordon, Knowles, Rowland, Troy, Shearer, 
Steed; Secretary Hardy, Treasurer Johnson, Mr. Mehegan 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Lynton, Vice 
President Edelman, Mr. Cass, Mr. White, Father Walsh 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino 

UM/Worcester : Dr. Wheeler, Associate Dean Stockwell 



The meeting was called to order at 11:07 a.m. 

At Chairman Healey 's request, President Wood addressed 
the Committee. He informed the Committee that planning for the 
opening of the Teaching Hospital had continued, but that it did 
not now seem realistic to expect the hospital to open as scheduled 
on July 1, 1975. He cited interrelated issues of budgeting and 
snags in approval for equipment purchases by the Department of 
Administration and Finance as the reasons, but added that the 
clinics of the hospital were expected to open in late spring or 
early summer . 

Mr. Stockwell, Director of the Hospital, told the 
Committee that equipment was lacking in all departments, except 
for $500,000 in X-ray equipment already purchased and in the 
hospital. He observed that the lead time required for the equip- 
ment was three or four months from the time of approval, and said 
that planning was going ahead on the assumption that the Depart- 
ment of Administration and Finance would approve the equipment 
allocation for the hospital. He added that an August 1 opening 
was an objective. 

Chairman Healey next cited the list of scheduled 
Committee meetings for the next several months. He observed that 
all Committee meetings were scheduled for either Tuesday or 
Wednesday of the third week of each month to reduce travel time 
for representatives of the Amherst and Worcester campuses, and to 



I 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



keep Trustees' time commitments at a minimum. The Committee 
expressed its general assent to the plan. Trustee Rowland said the 
Long-Range Planning Committee needed flexibility about the particular 
months it meets, and suggested this decision not be pinned down in 
advance. Trustee Knowles asked that the Buildings and Grounds 
Committee be kept informed of developments when meetings are not 
held in a given month. 

The Chairman directed the Committee's attention to the 
next two items on the agenda, a Classification of Position Titles 
and Personnel Action — UM/Worcester (Docs. T75-077, T75-078) , and a 
Personnel Action — UM/ Amherst (Doc. T75-079). Upon motions made and 
seconded, it was 



4495 

Exec. Comm. 
2-5-75 

Trustee 
Committee 
Meeting Schedule 



1 



1 



VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees confirm 

and approve the classification of position titles 
as detailed in Doc. T75-077 and the personnel 
action as detailed in Doc. T75-078. 

It was further 

VOTED : That the classification of Position Titles under 
the Provisions of Chapter 648 of the Acts of 
1962 shall be fixed in a weekly salary range 
from a minimum to a maximum or fixed at a specific 
weekly salary rate which shall not be changed 
except by vote of the Board of Trustees and such 
classification shall not be designated by any 
job group number or grade. 

And also 

VOTED : That, in accordance with the provisions of 

Chapter 648 of the Acts of 1962, the position 
title in the Professional Staff detailed in 
Doc. T75-077 is classified at a weekly salary 
rate specified after the title of the position 
subject to subsequently being amended, revised, 
added to or repealed by the Board of Trustees 
under the provisions of said Chapter 648. 

VOTED : That every personnel action shall be subject 

to the policies and procedures now in effect as 
subsequently amended, revised, added to or 
repealed by the Board of Trustees with respect 
to professional personnel under the provisions 
of Chapter 75 of the General Laws as amended by 
Chapter 648 of the Acts of 1962. The classifica- 
tion, salary range and descriptive job specifica- 
tion for each position to which a member of the 
professional staff is hereby appointed, promoted, 



UM/Worcester — 
Classification 
of Position 
Titles and 
Personnel Action 
(Docs. T75-077, 
and 078) 

UM/Amherst — 
Personnel Action 
(Doc. T75-079) 



4496 

Exec. Comm. 
2-5-75 

UM/Worc ester — 
Classification 
of Position 
Titles and 

_ COMMITTEE 

Personnel 

Action 

(Docs. T75-077, 

078) 

UM/Amherst — 

Personnel 

Action 

(Doc. T75-079) 

UM/Amherst — 
Affirmative 
Action Plan 
(Doc. T75-081) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

transferred or determined shall be as hereafter 
determined by the Board of Trustees or under 
their authority. 

And it was further 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees grant 
an exemption from the provisions of paragraph 
six of the University of Massachusetts Sabbatical 
Leave Policy in the case of Mortimer H. Appley 
for the reasons set forth in Trustee Document 
T75-079. 

The Committee next turned to the Amherst Affirmative 
Action Plan (Doc. T75-081) . Chancellor Bromery told the Committee 
that the five-volume plan conformed fully with the regulations of 
the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. He had had 
some indication that it was looked upon so favorably that HEW 
planned to use it as a model for other universities. 

Trustee Gordon asked whether the plan set forth specific 
actions to be taken in specific areas. Vice President Edelman 
replied that the plan contains timetables and objectives. He said 
he had reviewed it carefully and he considered it to be an 
excellent plan of which any university could be proud. He said 
such a plan was only half the process and that the next step was 
to carry it out. Chairman Healey remarked that the plan cuts 
across all areas of University activity and that the timetables 
may present some difficulties. Vice President Edelman pointed out 
that the concept of goals and timetables does not require inflexible 
adherence when truly insuperable obstacles are encountered. He 
added that there had been close cooperation throughout between 
representatives of HEW and the Amherst campus, and that HEW had been 
pleased with its relations with the campus in the formulation of 
the plan. 

There being no further discussion, a motion was made and 
seconded and it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees adopt 
and approve the Affirmative Action Plan of the 
University of Massachusetts at Amherst which 
was submitted to the Regional Office of Civil 
Rights (H.E.W.) on March 14, 1974, and is 
summarized in Trustee Document T75-081; provided, 
however, that this vote shall in no way be 
construed as a statement or admission of any 
prior discriminatory practice in employment. 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Committee went into executive session at 11:40 a.m. 
and adjourned at 12:31 p.m. 




CaJtZ- 




HadyU Keith Hardy 
'Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4497 

Exec. Comm. 
2-5-75 






I 



4 498 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Amherst — 

Graduation 

Lists 

(Doc. T75-076) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

February 5, 1975; 12:15 p.m. 

College I Faculty Dining Room 

Harbor Campus 

University of Massachusetts at Boston 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Troy; Trustees 
Chandler, Croce, Shearer, Steed; Miss Eichel 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Lynton 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery, Vice Chancellor and 
Provost Gluckstern 



The meeting was called to order at 12:45 p.m. by 
Chairman Troy. 

The Chairman presented for consideration a proposed 
Vote relative to the approval and ratification of the February 1, 
1975, Graduation Lists, UM/Amherst . Chairman Troy informed the 
Committee that the undergraduate, graduate and Continuing Educa- 
tion lists had been properly prepared and approved, and upon 
motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
approve and ratify the Graduation Lists of 
February 1, 1975, UM/Amherst, as certified by 
the Recorder of that campus and contained in 
Doc. T75-076. 

There being no further business to come before the 
Committee, the meeting adjourned at 12:50 p.m. 



^Gladyfi Keith Hardy " 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



COMMITTEE 



4 499 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON THE BUDGET 

February 19, 1975; 10:30 a.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Carlson, President 
Wood; Trustees Croce, Savini, Steed, Troy; Treasurer 
Johnson; Secretary Hardy, Ms. Judd, recorder 

Office of the President : Vice President Lynton; Mr. 
Gartenberg, Budget Director; Mr. Lewis, Staff Associate 
to the Budget Director 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Gluckstern, Vice 
Chancellor and Provost; Professor Fletcher, Faculty 
Representative; Mr. Gulko, Budget Director 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino, Mr. Hamilton, Vice 
Chancellor for Administration and Finance; Mr. Baxter, 
Budget Director; Professor Gagnon, Faculty Representative 

UM/Worcester : Dr. Butcher, Acting Dean of the Medical 
School; Mr. Cathey, Controller; Mr. Stockwell, Associate 
Dean for Administrative Affairs and Hospital Director 



The meeting was called to order at 10:35 a.m. by Chairman 
Carlson who called upon President Wood to say a few general words 
Defore turning to the business before the Committee. 

The President reviewed for the Committee recent develop- 
ments at the University including the resignation of Chancellor 
Boutter. President Wood said that he had appointed Dr. Reginald W. 
Butcher to serve as Acting Dean of the Medical School. Dr. H. 
Brownell Wheeler will continue to serve as Chief of Staff for the 
Teaching Hospital. 

President Wood turned to the present budget situation. The 
Dudget for $118 million which was approved by the Trustees in the 
:all had been based on a set of economic and price assumptions which 
represented the best judgment at that time. In the last ten months, 
during which the budget was prepared and submitted, economic con- 
ditions have worsened drastically. Circumstances now warrant the 
planning and development of alternative strategies for the next 
:hree to five years. The campuses have been asked to continue their 
departmental long-range planning and examine the possibilities for 
fundamental changes in some programs and plans. In the short range, 
the University is maintaining that the $118 million budget is 
necessary. 



President ' s 
Comments 



4 5 00 

Budget Comm. 
2-19-75 

President ' s 
Comments 



COMMITTEE 



Chairman' s 
Comments 



UM/Worcester — 
State Fund 
Transfers 
(Doc. T75-082) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Wood said that the Governor has stated that he 
will not present a budget until the summer, at which time a quarter 
budget will be presented. With a general revenue estimate of $100 
million below FY 1975 levels, no indication has been given of the 
program mix, especially with the heavy burdens of welfare and health 
care needs. In getting its planning activity underway, the Univer- 
sity will have developed alternative priorities so that in the 
summer, when the Executive budget decisions are clearer, accommo- 
dation can be made with some sense of future impact, and not just 
arbitrary decisions. 

Chairman Carlson commented on the budget which was sub- 
mitted to and approved by the Trustees in October. It is, he said, 
a very fine document and a considerable improvement over prior 
years. Although the Budget Committee should make sure that the 
figures which come before it are consistent and accurate, it should 
be more centrally concerned wih the program-related issues of the 
budget. The Budget Committee reviews the fiscal implications of the 
University's plans, and as much time as possible should be devoted 
to issues such as inflation, academic planning and review, and how 
the assumptions set forth in the budget document affect not only 
the next fiscal year but also those to follow. 

Chairman Carlson then asked for a review of the budget 
meeting called by Secretary Parks and the impact of the Governor's 
$20 million deficiency bill and its possible relation to the 
University budget. 

President Wood responded that former Secretary Cronin helc 
a public hearing on the University ' s FY 1976 Budget in November. 
In January, Secretary Parks called a meeting of segment heads and 
their budget officers and asked them to review their budget situa- 
tions. It was felt that while requested information would be pro- 
vided, it is essentially the Secretary's responsibility to advise 
the Governor with his own recommendations on resources to be 
allocated to education. 

Mr. Gartenberg then commented on the deficiency bill 
saying that the $20 million figure included $15 million for fuel 
and energy costs, and that it was his understanding that a reason- 
able approximation of the University's requirements was included in 
this request. 

The Committee then turned to the Worcester Campus State 
Fund Transfers (Doc. T75-082) . Dr. Butcher outlined the requested 
transfers . 

Following brief discussion, a motion was made and 
seconded, and it was 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
revisions to the FY 1975 Operating Budget for 
UM/Worcester , as contained in Trustee Document 
T75-082. 

The next item on the agenda was the report on the Univer- 
sity Austerity Program. Mr. Gartenberg reviewed for the Committee 
some of the cost-saving measures which have been instituted. He 
pointed out that because of the rise of the cost of living and the 
escalation of fuel costs, the extent of the deficiency requirements 
is much larger than in prior years. As a result, attempts have been 
made to reduce costs on the various campuses to a bare minimum with 
a resultant saving of a minimum of $2.1 million. He said that the 
exact deficiency requests will be submitted to the Commonwealth as 
soon as the campuses present their final figures. The nature of 
the University problems has already been communicated to Secretary 
Buckley and Secretary Parks, along with an outline of steps the 
University is taking to reduce the size of the deficiency. The 
timing of receipt of funds, he said, is contingent upon action by 
the Legislature and the Executive Office of Administration and 
Finance. 

Chairman Carlson then asked for the comments of the 
campuses on the status of their midyear reviews. 

At the request of Chancellor Bromery, Budget Director 
Gulko began for the Amherst campus by speaking about the personnel 
freeze and its effect particularly on the academic departments. In 
the non-personnel accounts, a freeze has been put on all funds which 
amounts to 4.3% of the total budget; this figure can be translated 
to 8.6% at midyear. In some cases, an impact on the order of a 
20% cut is now beginning to show. He said that the implementation 
of the austerity program is having a beneficial psychological effect 
in that there is a general concern for austerity throughout the 
campus. The Faculty Senate has taken the initiative to form a 
sub-committee for "economies of the small" and resultant savings are 
beginning to build up. 

Turning to the fuel problem, Mr. Gulko said that it is a 
major problem for the campus. The deficiency at the beginning of 
the year was $2.5-$3 million. A variety of energy conserving 
measures has been instituted, and with some savings resulting from 
reducing inventory, it is hoped that the deficiency can be brought 
down to $2-$2.2 million. Chancellor Bromery then brought up the 
problem of auxiliary enterprises which are faced with inflation and 
the campus's need to offset these inflationary costs without applying 
them to student bills. This is a problem which he hopes will be 
addressed by the Trustees later this spring. The discussion of the 
Amherst campus's midyear status concluded for the present meeting, 
and Chairman Carlson asked that it be continued at the next Budget 
Committee meeting. 



4501 

Budget Comm. 
2-19-75 

UM/Worcester — 
State Fund 
Transfers 
(Doc. T75-082) 



University 
Austerity 
Program 
Report 



UM/ Amherst — 
Midyear Review 



. 



4502 



Budget Coram, 
2-19-75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



UM/Boston — 
Midyear Review 



COMMITTEE 



Chancellor Golino next spoke for the Boston campus with 
regard to its midyear fiscal review. He said that, in a year when 
certain plans were finally coming to fruition for the Harbor 
Campus, it was very difficult to institute a freeze and austerity 
program which reached spartan proportions in some departments. He 
indicated, however, that there had previously been a self-imposed 
economy drive but that appointments were now being made only when 
absolutely necessary. In general, he said, the psychological 
effects of the austerity program have had the greatest impact on 
the campus, particularly on the faculty. 

Vice Chancellor Hamilton reported on the status of 
energy conservation on the Boston campus. He pointed out some con- 
trol problems encountered as the campus is still adjusting to its 
new physical plant. The savings achieved so far are about 
$100,000 to $200,000 as a result of the campus's having closed 
down during the Christmas vacation. A consultant has been engaged 
to identify all elements of all energy systems, inventory the 
control devices of the present system, plan a budget for each air 
handling system in each building, and then give recommendations 
for control procedures needed to meet each operating budget. 

Referring to Mr. Gulko's earlier remarks, Professor 
Fletcher, faculty representative from UM/Amherst, said that he 
wished to emphasize the seriousness of the impact on the academic 
departments of the austerity program and the importance of careful 
planning so that significant programs will not suffer in the long 
run. 



UM/Worcester — 
Midyear Review 



Dr. Butcher was asked for any comments which he had to 
add to the overall midyear review. He replied that the Worcester 
situation was analogous to that of the Boston campus in being con- 
fronted with rising costs, but not rising resources, and a new 
plant. With regard to fuel, he said, air handling units are shut 
off in any areas which are not occupied. By shutting these units 
off in the evening hours and during weekends, there has been an 
estimated savings of $250,000. This saving, however, is offset by 
the increasing demand of the contractor for the Teaching Hospital 
and by the fact that three floors (300,000 sq. ft.) of the Teaching 
Hospital are now occupied. In addition, a campus budget committee 
was formed in October; this committee examined all budget alloca- 
tions. Its first action was to freeze all accounts; since then, 
minor allocations have been made. The campus now finds itself in 
the position of trying to grow while following the guidelines of 
austerity. '"■ • • ^ ^_ 

Trustee Troy asked how the austerity program affected 
the facilities at Waltham, Wareham, and Gloucester. Mr. Gulko 
replied that they were included as part of the Amherst campus, 
and that they were being examined programmatically . 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The subject of the length of the teaching calendar year 
and its relation to budgetary concerns was raised by Trustee Troy. 
Prof. Fletcher noted that this has been a concern of the faculty 
and that the Rules Committee of the Faculty Senate has directed 
one of its subcommittees to study and report on it. After a brief 
discussion during which it was stated that the campuses are in the 
best position to make an initial review, Chairman Carlson stated 
that this is a perfect example of the kind of issue that has budget 
implications but is fundamentally the responsibility of the Faculty 
and Educational Policy Committee. 

Prof. Gagnon stated that the University is implementing 
an austerity program because it is in doubt that the deficiency 
figure will be approved by the Commonwealth. In light of that kind 
of pessimism, he said, how prudent is it to talk as if we're going 
to be given $118 million in FY 1976? It is likely to make things 
terribly difficult to get grassroots concern if we are in austerity 
and at the same time being told to operate on the assumption that 
we're going to grow and get the budget requested. To have the 
faculty hear that we're going to proceed after March 15 as though 
we were going to get the $118 million is confusing and demoralizing. 

Mr. Gartenberg replied to these points, saying that 
whether the state approves or disapproves the deficiency request is 
contingent upon whether or not it has the money. The University 
will not move away from a position that the Trustees have approved 
until more information from the Executive branch as to priorities 
is known. The State budget as it has been presented is really an 
incomplete budget in terms of being able to grasp how the state will 
solve its next year's fiscal problems. 

Dr. Lynton next spoke, saying that in relation to the 
March 15 date, he had, at the President's request, asked the pro- 
vosts of the campuses to delay making any kind of formal commitment 
for any academic positions but at the same time to proceed with all 
recruiting procedures. He added that the Medical School has been 
operating under this advisement since last November. 

Chairman Carlson closed the meeting with the hope that 
at its next meeting, the Budget Committee could discuss tentative 
budget projections which would reflect the academic planning and 
analysis now going on. 

There being no further business, the meeting adjourned 
at 12:10 p.m. 



£TLadys(/Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 




4503 

Budget Comm. 
2-19-75 



■ ■. • . 



4 5 04 



COMMITTEE 



President ' s 
Comments 



Comments by 
Trustee Spiller 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEES COMMITTEE ON LONG-RANGE PLANNING 

February 19, 1975; 1:00 p.m. 

Office of the President, University of Massachusetts 
One Washington Mall, Boston, Massachusetts 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Rowland, President 

Wood; Trustees Carlson, Chandler, Clark, Robertson, Savini 
Spiller, Steed; Mr. Callahan, representing Trustee Anrig; 
Secretary Hardy, Miss Eichel, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Lynton, Vice 
President Robinson; Mr. Cooley, Assistant Vice President 
for Analytical Studies 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Gluckstern, Vice 
Chancellor and Provost; Prof. Fletcher, Faculty Represen- 
tative; Mr. Gulko, Budget Director 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Babcock, Executive 
Assistant Chancellor 



The meeting was called to order at 1:10 p.m. by Chairman 
Rowland, who welcomed Trustee Catherine F. Clark to the Committee. 
The Chairman outlined the agenda for the meeting and asked President 
Wood for his comments. The President reviewed for the Committee 
recent developments at the University including the resignation of 
Chancellor Soutter. President Wood said that he had appointed Dr. 
Reginald W. Butcher to serve as Acting Dean of the Medical School. 
Dr. H. Brownell Wheeler will continue to serve as Chief of Staff 
for the Teaching Hospital. President Wood said the Trustees would 
receive in the near future a copy of a report he had sent to 
Chairman Healey which reviewed the recent problems at the School of 
Education at UM/Amherst and concluded with a series of recommenda- 
tions, the most important of which is the establishment of an out- 
side committee to appraise the School of Education. 

President Wood next turned to problems of the budget, 
stating that he felt it was very important that state agencies 
know exactly what various budget figures would mean to the Univer- 
sity, not just for the current fiscal year, but over a period of 
four to five years. 

Chairman Rowland next called upon Trustee Spiller, who 
said that background documents, if lengthy, should include a 
summary of highlights. He also suggested that some members of the 
Board may not wish to receive all the informational material now 
sent regularly to the Trustees. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Rowland turned to the topic of the campus five- 
year plans, and emphasized that she wanted to provide a chance 
first for reactions and discussion by the members of the Committee. 
Chairman Rowland then asked Trustee Carlson, newly appointed 
Chairman of the Budget Committee, to speak to the concerns of that 
Committee. Mr. Carlson stated that an important task of the Budget 
Committee is to assess the financial implications of the long- 
range plans of the campuses, including program plans. He indicated 
that although the Budget Committee should not become directly 
involved in matters before the Long-Range Planning or the Faculty 
and Educational Policy Committee, it is important that the Committees 
work together to establish priorities where money may not be 
available for all programs which may be desirable. 

Trustee Carlson stated that it would be his preference to 
see the Committee on Long-Range Planning set limits within which 
the campuses could do their planning. Once enrollment patterns 
have been determined, the campuses could develop program alternatives 
Trustee Robertson stated that although he saw a need for continued 
growth at UM/Boston, he could not see the same necessity at UM/ 
Amherst . 

Chancellor Bromery was asked where the enrollment figure 
of 30,000 mentioned in the five-year plans had originated, and he 
replied that this was the general target during the late I960' s 
when the physical growth of the campus was most rapid. In answer 
to a question on the potential enrollment capacity of the current 
facilities, Vice President Robinson replied that, using a measure 
of 200 GSF/student, the present plant capacity is about 25,000 
students. President Wood added that the Marcus Report recommended 
a total enrollment of 30,000, but based on a review of fiscal 
requirements and environmental impact, the Board of Trustees 
established an enrollment ceiling of 25,000. Certain detailed 
issues must now be resolved; such as whether this figure is based 
upon headcount or FTE (full-time equivalent) , relationship of pro- 
fessional and career education programs to liberal arts, the number 
of on- and off-campus programs offered, etc. 

Trustee Carlson said that he feels the action taken by 
the Long-Range Planning Committee in June 1974 with respect to 
enrollment at UM/Boston, although unpopular, was of assistance to 
the campus in enabling them to plan within the limits set. He 
also stated that if the Trustees do not set limits, limits will 
be set by someone else. 

Chairman Rowland asked if more students could be served 
within the same budget. A discussion ensued about the desirability 
of looking at institutional behavior, faculty staffing formula, 
class size, program patterns and changing student clientele. 
Trustee Spiller asked that the Amherst campus provide a starting 
point from which the Committee could proceed in looking at enroll- 
ment limits. It was the consensus that the Amherst campus 



4505 

Long-Range Plan 
2-19-75 



UM/Amherst- 

Enrollment 

Planning 



4 



4506 

Long-Range Plan, 
2-19-75 

UM/Amherst — 

Enrollment 

Planning 

COMMITTEE 



UM/Amherst — 
Report on 
Student 
Profiles 



UM/Boston — 
Direction for 
Campus 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

administration would provide the following materials 
President's Office at the end of a month: 



to be in the 



1. An assessment of future student demand; 

2. An assessment of the physical capacity of the 
present campus buildings in terms of headcount 
and/or FTE students; 

3. An assessment of the potential environmental 
effects of additional enrollment; 

4. Recommendations with regard to the appropriate 
student mix and a projected schedule for reaching 
any changes to current patterns. 

Chairman Rowland turned to the topic of student profiles 
and asked Mr. Cooley to speak to this subject. Mr. Cooley said 
that the student profiles had been developed from responses to a 
voluntary questionnaire attached to the application form of the 
Admissions Testing Program of the College Entrance Examination 
Board. Described and contrasted are the 1974 freshman applicants 
to the University of Massachusetts, other Massachusetts public 
universities, the state college system and how these profiles 
compare to national norms. He stated that profiles on those 
applicants who later enrolled will be available in the near future. 
Mr. Cooley went on to describe some of the specific socio-economic, 
racial, academic, and^ educational and career aspiration character- 
istics profiled in the study and noted some changes in comparing 
student applicants of 1971. 

Trustee Chandler asked what possibility there was for 
greater growth at UM/Amherst and UM/Boston, to which President 
Wood replied that Boston is still not a complete campus in pro- 
grams or in physical structure. Chancellor Golino stated his con- 
viction that the most important matter for the Boston campus is 
not enrollment policy but a statement by the Trustees as to the 
purpose of the campus — whether it should be specializing in pre- 
freshmen programs, tutorial services, graduate education, experi- 
mental programs, etc. The faculty, the students, the community, 
the Trustees, and the Legislature all appear to have different 
ideas of what the campus should be doing. He said that he had 
been asked why College IV is being developed with money so tight, 
and his response had been that this college is a particularly 
important feature for the type of students attracted to UM/Boston. 
He said that the importance of a graduate program had also been 
questioned. The Chancellor stated that the New Directions Com- 
mittee report has been under debate in the University Assembly 
and that once the debate was concluded, he would submit his own 
proposals on these important issues. 



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COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Spiller said that it is important to have input 
from students and faculty, but it is the Chancellor who must make 
recommendations to the Committee based on many sources and his own 
judgment. 

Trustee Carlson said that the recommendation of the 
Chancellor should not necessarily reflect the original plans for 
UM/Boston, but should be a statement of what is best for the 
campus as of the present moment. Chancellor Golino indicated that 
he would report to the President by March 19 on his recommendations. 

Chairman Rowland turned the discussion next to the Fine 
Arts Council and asked Vice President Lynton to report. He 
informed the Committee that the Council had had two substantial 
meetings, one at UM/Boston and one at UM/Amherst, and the next 
meeting is scheduled for March 15. In preparation for the Council's 
interim report to the President and the Board of Trustees on the 
fine arts programs, Mr. Lynton will be talking with the department 
heads to obtain their views on the future status of the fine arts 
programs. Chairman Rowland asked what progress is being made in 
the attempt to move dance from the physical education department 
and was informed that it would probably be moved to the music 
department. Vice President Robinson stated that the inaugural 
season events will begin at the Fine Arts Building in October, 
although there will be delays in the installation of both lighting 
and sound equipment and some improvisation will be required. 

The next meeting of the Committee on Long-Range Planning 
having been scheduled for April 16 and there being no further 
business to come before the Committee, the meeting was adjourned 
at 3:22 p.m. 



4507 



Long-Range Plan, 
2-19-75 

UM/Boston — 
Direction for 

Campus 



Report on 
Fine Arts 
Council 




eith Hardy VJ 
ecretary to the Board of Trustees 



4 5 08 



COMMITTEE 



Report of 

Investment 

Counsel 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

February 19, 1975; 4:00 p.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Gordon; Trustees 
Robertson, Rowland, and Savini; Secretary Hardy, 
Treasurer Johnson, Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Mr. Gartenberg, Budget 
Director; Mr. Keith, Associate Vice President for 
University Policy; Mr. Lewis, Staff Associate to the 
Budget Director; Mr. O'Leary, Assistant Counsel 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery, Dr. Gage, Vice Chancellor 
for Student Affairs; Professor Fletcher, Faculty Repre- 
sentative; Mr. Gulko , Budget Director 

Guests : Ms. Karen Forsgard, Amherst undergraduate 
student; Ms. Karen Mangan, Amherst undergraduate student: 
Mr. Peter Muello, Daily Collegian staff; Mr. Patrick 
Walker, Amherst graduate student; Ms. Rosemary Whit taker, 
wife of Amherst graduate student; Mr. John Wood of 
Standish, Ayer & Wood 



The meeting was called to order at 4:10 p.m. Chairman 
Gordon called on Mr. John Wood of Standish, Ayer & Wood. Speaking 
of the University's portfolio, he described the degree to which 
the market value was below the book value of the portfolio. In 
spite of this, he said, he did not favor any changes. He said 
this was because the recent rise in the market was temporary. 

Mr. Wood then sketched the state of the stock market and 
the changes which had taken place over the preceding six weeks. 
He said he expected violent fluctuations in the market to continue 
throughout the seventies, and added that he believed the market to 
be presently undervalued. 

Mr. Wood reported that Standish, Ayer & Wood had invested 
$37,000 in equities since the last Finance Committee meeting, and 
that the new holdings were now worth about $46,000. Speaking of 
the future, he observed that the portion of the portfolio invested 
in equities had, as a result of the recent surge in the market, 
reached a level near 65 percent. If prices were to move the 
percentage to or beyond the 70 percent, he remarked, he would 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



recommend cutting it back to between 60 and 70 percent. 

Trustee Rowland asked about the desirability of a large 
number of bond holdings of long-term maturity. Mr. Wood replied 
that he believed that the University should probably shorten its 
list of such holdings. In response to a question about the com- 
parative performance of the portfolio, Mr. Wood said it was doing 
better than many others of its type. 

Chairman Gordon thanked Mr. Wood and asked him to report 
to the Committee again at its next meeting. 

The second item on the agenda was the Request of Repre - 
sentatives of Tenants of Married Students Housing to Appear Before 



the Board of Trustees (Doc. T75-084) . The Chairman called upon 



Chancellor Bromery and Dr. Gage to give the Committee some back- 
ground. 

Chancellor Bromery reviewed the chronology of the matter. 
He observed that the Amherst campus had three married student 
housing complexes of varying ages. He said that Vice Chancellor 
Gage has endeavored in the last year to equalize the rents of the 
three complexes, since the older complexes were debt-free while the 
newer ones were not. As a consequence, the rents in the older 
apartment complexes have risen more sharply than those of the 
newer ones. He said some of the students in the older apartments 
felt these increases to be unfair because they did not believe they 
ought to pay for the expense of maintaining the newer apartments. 

A Liaison Committee had been set up to hear the matter, 
the Chancellor said, and after considerable discussion the differ- 
ences had not been resolved. The University had felt comfortable 
with the arrangement it had, while the students expressed a desire 
to bring their petition for immediate action before the Board. The 
Liaison Committee had concluded that the Board should hear the 
petition, and had so recommended. 



Vice Chancellor Gage explored further some 
of the issue. He informed the Committee that discus 
1975 rents had taken place with the Married Students 
tee, which the University had felt at that time to b 
representative of the students. The recommendation 
rents was an attempt to solve two problems: (1) if 
North Village were set at the fair market level, the 
would be uncompetitive with non-University housing; 
University Apartments will soon need repairs, yet if 
had not increased the rents as it had, it would in e 
sidizing them. 



of the details 
sions about 

Housing Commit- 
e the legitimate 
to equalize the 
the rent of 

apartments 
(2) Lincoln and 

the University 
ffect be sub- 



The new rent structure was presented to the Married 
Students Housing Committee in the spring in 1974, said Dr. Gage, 



4 5 09 

Finance Comm, 
2-19-75 



Report of 

Investment 

Counsel 



UM/Amherst — 
Request of 
Representatives 
of Tenants of 
Married Students 
Housing to 
Appear Before 
the Board of 
Trustees 
(Doc. T75-084) 



4 510 

Finance Comm. 
2-19-75 

UM/Amherst — 
Request of 
Representatives 
of Tenants of 
Married COMM,TTEE 
Students Housing 
to Appear Before 
the Board of 
Trustees 
(Doc. T75-084) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

and the committee had agreed on the new system. The students 
themselves, he said, had also agreed to the equalization, although 
he observed that the students presently aggrieved had not been 
represented in the discussions. These discussions in March and 
April of 1974 had preceded the Board vote in June 1974 to approve 
the fee-based budget. 

The Chairman called upon the students to give their 
presentations, informing them as he did so that under the Board's 
rules for petitions and communications, they would be able to 
speak for a period not to exceed five minutes each. 

Ms. Rosemary Whit taker gave an overview of the grievance, 
which alleged that the occupants of the married students housing 
had been unfairly treated by the Married Students Housing Committee 
and that the problems of the University in operating the apartments, 
though real, were in part due to mismanagement and could be solved 
through administrative changes. She emphasized the serious nature 
of the matter, and said the Married Students Tenants Association 
believed it serious enough to warrant the present rent strike. 

Mr. Patrick Walker alleged that the rent increases at 
Lincoln and University Apartments were illegal for the following 
reasons: (1) that the tenants were not properly represented at 
the Married Student Housing meeting in April at which the increase 
was approved; (2) that the joining of the Lincoln and University 
trust fund to the North Village trust fund for the purpose of 
covering the costs of mismanagements at North Village entails 
illegal commingling of trust funds; and (3) that the Trustees 
have breached their fiduciary duty in failing to manage the 
trusts in the best interests of the tenants, as beneficiaries of 
these trusts. 

Ms. Karen Forsgard outlined the allegation that the 
apartments were incompetently managed. She cited several of the 
administrative practices which, she believed, illustrated a pattern 
of poor management. She argued also that surpluses of funds 
available made the increases unnecessary and, she said, a rent 
rollback possible. 

Ms. Karen Mangan proposed an immediate rollback of rents 
in Lincoln and University Apartments to pre-1975 levels, a 
rescission of the June 1974 Trustee vote approving the fee-based 
budget, and new negotiations on the matter of rent structure which 
would lead to an end of the rent strike. 

The Chairman and other Trustees initiated a discussion 
of the character of the negotiations which had taken place. Dr. 
Gage said he had not seen all of the information which the students 
had orally presented to the Committee, while the students indicated 
that they believed the presentations of their case which had taken 
place to have been full and covering essentially the same 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

information presented to the Trustees. 

Chancellor Bromery proposed that the students' presenta- 
tion, with documentation, be assembled together with a reconcili- 
ation of their information and that of the campus administration 
for the Committee's consideration. Chairman Gordon explained to 
the students that the Committee, having heard their petition, would 
not at this time recommend action to the Board without further 
studying the data pertinent to the issue. He and other members of 
the Committee approved Chancellor Bromery 's suggestion, and Secre- 
tary Hardy asked the students to forward copies of their report to 
her office. The Chairman assured the students that the Committee 
would act quickly when all the information was received. 

The Chairman declared an executive session at 5:10 p.m. 
which ended at 5:40 p.m. Trustees Rowland and Savini left the 
meeting after the executive session to keep prior commitments. 

The next item was a report on bids requested for Compre- 
hensive Liability Insurance for the University. Treasurer Johnson 
sketched the background of the matter, stating that the Board had 
authorized him to seek bids for the desired insurance program. Many 
bids had been received, he said, and they had been narrowed to one, 
that of the firm of Marsh and MacLennan, which had offered the best 
chance for the University to get the plan desired by means of 
negotiation. Marsh and MacLennan had suggested that they be given 
a broker-of-record letter designating them the sole representative 
of the University in the process of negotiation with insurance 
companies. 

Since the broker-of-record letter involved no commitment 
on the University's part to agree to the result of negotiations, 
and since no funds were involved, it was the conclusion of the 
Committee upon the advice of Counsel O'Leary that Treasurer Johnson 
should execute the letter on the basis of the Board of Trustees 
vote of February 5, 1975, which had authorized him to solicit bids 
for the privilege of providing an insurance program. That vote is 
hereby made a part of these minutes. 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer of the University, 
in consultation with the President, to solicit 
bids for the privilege of providing a compre- 
hensive liability insurance program in accord- 
ance with the Invitation to Bidders and 
Specifications set forth in Trustee Document 
T75-071. 

The final item on the agenda, a Real Estate Purchase 
Agreement (Doc. T75-085) required a vote. Since a quorum was no 
longer present, the Committee deferred the matter to a special 
meeting to be held March 5. 



4511 

Finance Comm. 
2-19-75 

UM/Amherst — 
Request of 
Representatives 
of Tenants of 
Married Students 
Housing to 
Appear Before 
the Board of 
Trustees 
(Doc. T75-084) 



Executive 
Session 



Report on Bids 
Requested on 
Personal 
Liability 
Insurance 



Real Estate 
Purchase Agree- 
ment 
(Doc. T75-085) 



4512 

Finance Comm. 
2-19-75 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

There being no further business, Chairman Gordon 
adjourned the meeting at 5:50 p.m. 



($lady$/ Keith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 



March 5, 1975; 10:30 a.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Gordon; Trustees 
Abrams, Carlson, Croce, Haigis, Knowles, Robertson, 
Rowland, Spiller, Sullivan, Weldon; Secretary Hardy, 
Treasurer Johnson, Miss Eichel, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Mr. Searson, General Counsel 

UM/ Amherst : Professor Fletcher, Faculty Representative; 
Mr. Lindsey, Graduate Student Representative; Professor 
Wilkinson, Alternate Faculty Representative 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino 

UM/Worcester: Mr. Cathey, Controller 



The meeting was called to order at 10:45 a.m. by Chairman 
Gordon, who called upon Treasurer Johnson to review the conditions 
of the original agreement between the University and Nationwide 
Development Company for the sale of two parcels of land located 
in Ohio, left to the University under the terms of the will of 
Murray D. Lincoln. 

Treasurer Johnson explained that on June 6, 1973, the 
Board of Trustees had voted to authorize him to enter into an 
agreement on their behalf with Nationwide Development Company for 
the sale of the two parcels of land involved. Pursuant to that 
vote, said Mr. Johnson, a Real Estate Purchase Agreement had been 
executed. At the request of the buyer, this agreement had sub- 
sequently been extended to terminate on September 13, 1975. The 
buyer has recently requested an amendment to the original agreement, 
and Treasurer Johnson asked that the Committee consider the current 
proposal and several options. 

The meeting recessed at 11:00 a.m. and reconvened at 
12:48. Following considerable discussion, it was the consensus of 
the Committee that more details were necessary before a decision 
could be made, and it was agreed that the matter would be deferred 
until such time as more d.etailed information could be obtained. 



4513 



Ohio Land Sale 



ii 



4 514 

Finance Comm. 
3-5-75 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

There being no further business to come before the 
Committee, the meeting adjourned at 1:00 p.m. 



I 



(Jlad^f} Keith Hardy 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

March 18, 1975; 10:00 a.m. 

Office of the President, University of Massachusetts 
One Washington Mall, Boston, Massachusetts 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Knowles, President 
Wood; Trustees Clark, Spiller; Treasurer Johnson, Miss 
Eichel, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Robinson; 

Mr. Post, Assistant Vice President for Physical Planning; 

Mr. Stephenson, Staff Associate, Planning Office 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Professor Fletcher, 
Faculty Representative; Mr. Littlefield, Director of 
Planning; Mr. Simpson, Staff Assistant; Planning Office 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino 

UM/Worcester : Dr. Majno, Chairman, Department of 
Pathology; Mr. Greig, Director of the Physical Plant 



The meeting was called to order at 10:17 a.m. by Chairman 
Knowles, who welcomed Trustee Spiller as a new member of the 
Committee. 

Chairman Knowles then turned to the first item on the 
agenda, the Naming of Buildings . A discussion ensued with regard 
to the nominations received to date, and various suggestions were 
made with regard to criteria to be considered in the naming of the 
various halls and buildings. The buildings at UM/Amherst concerned 
are the Library, the Fine Arts Center, the North Physical Education 
Building and the South Deerfield Animal Facilities. Chancellor 
Bromery indicated that he would be in a better position to present 
names at the May meeting of the Committee. 



Chairman Knowles next recognized Dr. 
of the Department of Pathology at UM/Worcester 
names had been received for the naming of the 
Science Building at UM/Worcester - one submitt 
Soutter, recently retired Chancellor and Dean 
and the other, the nomination of Dr. Soutter. 
as the one person who was chiefly responsible 
the Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Dr. 
of the Medical School faculty, administration, 
for this honor. 



Guido Majno, Chairman 
, who said that two 
library in the Medical 
ed by Dr . Lamar 
of the Medical School, 

Dr. Majno said that 
for the existence of 
Soutter was the choice 

staff, and students 



4515 



Naming of 
Buildings 



. 



4516 

B & G Comm. 
3-18-75 

Naming of 
Buildings 



COMMITTEE 



Masters' Pro- 
posal for 
Desegregation 
of Boston 
Schools 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Although it was agreed that to name a building or hall 
for a living person was a departure from the policy of the Buildings 
and Grounds Committee, in this case the Committee would be happy 
to make an exception, and on motion made and seconded, it was 
unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
Library in the Medical Science Building at the 
University of Massachusetts at Worcester be named 
for Dr. Lamar Soutter, former Chancellor and Dean 
of the Medical School. 

After brief discussion it was the sense of the meeting 
that the Medical School and Teaching Hospital would be known by 
their generic names, as had been formerly recommended by Dr. 
Soutter; hence they would be called "University of Massachusetts 
Medical School" and "University Hospital," or "University of 
Massachusetts Hospital." 

Chairman Knowles then requested Chancellor Golino to 
comment on the nominations received for names for buildings at 
UM/Boston. Chancellor Golino said that the suggestions received 
had varied greatly and felt that possibly a rationale for submitting 
names should have been included with the request for nominations. 
He expressed his belief that building names should reflect in some 
way the activities which take place in those buildings. He 
indicated that among the nominations received were the names of 
students who had died, and although he would like to honor these 
students, he felt there might be a more appropriate method for 
doing this. Chairman Knowles suggested that honorary plaques 
could be provided for this purpose. 

President Wood stated that he agreed with Chancellor 
Golino that unless a rationale for suggesting names were accepted, 
the variety of names received would make the Committee's task very 
difficult. Accordingly, Chairman Knowles requested the Chancellors 
to bring to the May meeting of the Committee both suggestions for 
names and ideas for a general rationale or policy within which 
names might be evaluated. 

The Chairman then asked President Wood for general com- 
ments. The President informed the Committee that he and other 
college and university presidents in the area had been asked on 
Friday last to join the Masters appointed by Judge Garrity to dis- 
cuss the tentative plan that the Masters will announce on March 24 
for the desegregation of the Boston schools. The Masters will 
propose to the Court a plan that will reorganize the school system 
around districts. The plan proposes to minimize bussing and to 
eliminate cross bussing. Under this plan, the schools in each 
district will be paired with a university or college in the area. 
The university or college will be responsible for the educational 
enrichment of the schools in the district and the relationship 
will be contractual. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



President Wood then asked Mr. Post to review the Draft 
Environmental Impact Report for Phase II construction at the Harbor 
Campus, UM/Boston. Mr. Post said this report was delivered by the 
Bureau of Building Construction on February 24 to the Department of 
Environmental Affairs and that it is open to agency and public com- 
ment for thirty days. The report, he said, addresses all potential 
effects of the proposed construction on the natural environment and 
on adjacent communities. The areas of particular attention are the 
possible effects of additional students on housing, sewage, and 
traffic. Traffic has not been the problem that had been anticipated 
by the community, and the Executive Office of Transportation has 
indicated that it would approve proposed Phase II parking. The 
Office, has, however, requested that Mt . Vernon Street be linked to 
the campus to allow for MBTA service to both the project and the 
campus. 

Turning to the third agenda item, negotiations for the use 
of the University facility at 100 Arlington Street by the Boston 
School Department, Chairman Knowles asked for a report on the current 
status of negotiations. Mr. Post replied that the University had 
offered the School Department the use of four additional floors of 
the building. He said that Brighton High School now occupies 
Floors 6 and 7. Further negotiations are awaiting the final 
decision of Judge Garrity. 

Chairman Knowles turned next to the matter of the site 
development at UM/Worcester and requested Mrs. Robinson to report. 
Mrs. Robinson said that the site development is keyed to the opening 
of the Teaching Hospital and it is constrained by the fact that a 
large part of the area is still being used by the hospital contrac- 
tors. She said that drawings on the two parking lots to the west of 
the Medical Science Building are completed and that it is anticipated 
that these lots and preliminary road work in the area will be 
finished this spring. The areas of particular concern in relation- 
ship to the opening of the hospital are parking lots for the 
emergency and out-patient areas. The University has requested 
money in the capital outlay budget for finished site work and 
planting. 

Of concern also is the status of the parking garage, on 
which a feasibility study has been completed by the firm of Kallmann 
& McKinnell and submitted to the Building Authority. President Wood 
said that a major problem to be faced by the Buildings and Grounds 
and Finance Committees would be the method of financing the garage. 
Depending on the final disposition of the proposal, it may be nec- 
essary to consider building additional temporary or permanent sur- 
face lots. Dr. Majno said that he felt it was very important that 
University personnel at Worcester understand the basis for any 
parking fees and are aware that all alternatives had been explored. 
He also emphasized the importance of completing the out-patient 
parking lot. President Wood suggested that further discussion on 
this subject be deferred until the Building Authority recommendations 



4517 

B & G Comm. 
3-18-75 

UM/Boston — 
Environmental 
Impact Report 



Negotiations for 
Use of 100 
Arlington Street 



UM/Worcester — 
Site Development 



4 518 



B & G Comm. 
3-18-75 

UM/ Wore ester — 
Site Develop- 
ment 

COMMITTEE 

UM/Boston — 
Request for 
Sculpture 
Exhibition 
Space 



Status of 
Kennedy Library 
Site Selection 



UM/Amherst — 

Improvement to 

Campus Movement 

Systems 

(Doc. T75-091) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

come before the Committee. It was agreed that a meeting could be 
called in April for this purpose. 

Chairman Knowles next asked for discussion of the agenda 
item relating to a request for sculpture exhibition space at the 
Harbor Campus, UM/Boston. Mrs. Robinson said this item had been 
listed for the information of the Committee and was the result of 
an inquiry by a local chapter of an international organization of 
women artists looking for possible sites in connection with a pro- 
posed sculpture competition. As yet there is no funding for the 
competition, and Assistant Chancellor Rawn has talked with the 
group about the temporary exhibition of their work. 

In connection with the subject of art, Chairman Knowles 
informed the Committee that at the request of Dr. Soutter, she had 
visited UM/Worcester in January to offer her advice with regard to 
some artistic means of making the corridors and public spaces in 
the Medical Science and Hospital buildings more attractive. She 
said she had suggested various ways in which this might be done, 
including the use of medical art, X-ray art, and histological 
slides. She had demonstrated on one wall with a semi-abstract 
design in which medical figures were used in both an abstract and 
a realistic fashion. She suggested that it may be possible to 
enlist artists in the State to participate in this project for 
nominal fees for the honor of having their work displayed in the 
buildings. She suggested that the committee responsible for the 
interior decoration of the buildings meet with Harold Roth, the 
architectural consultant for UM/Worcester, to discuss a list of 
artists to be invited to contribute to the beautif ication of the 
buildings. 

Chairman Knowles then asked for the status of the Kennedy 
Library site selection. Chancellor Bromery reported that the 
Kennedy people were particularly interested in one site at UM/ 
Amherst, and had appointed a group of University and community 
people to meet with representatives of the Corporation. Chancellor 
Golino informed the Committee that the Kennedy Corporation was also 
interested in one site at UM/Boston and that community reaction had 
been very favorable. It was emphasized that the Library would be 
a teaching as well as a tourist facility. Mrs. Robinson said that 
it is her understanding that the staff of the Corporation would 
like to present three or four options — probably including both 
UMASS sites — to their Board and that this would probably occur 
between the end of March and the middle of April. Chairman Knowles 
asked for a complete review of the advantages and disadvantages of 
locating the complex at the University, and Presiden t Wood agreed 
that this would be done. 

Chairman Knowles introduced the last item on the agenda, 
the presentation by Mr. Littlefield, Planning Director at UM/ 
Amherst, of the Improvement to Campus Movement Systems (Doc. T75- 
091). Mr. Littlefield reviewed the document, stating that these 



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plans are the result of ten to twelve years of planning for a 
pedestrian core campus at UM/Amherst. He reviewed the changes to 
the roads, including the contemplated closing of North Pleasant 
Street to through traffic, the closing of some of the core parking 
lots, the extension of the shuttle and outreach bus service and the 
greening of the core. He said that the balanced transportation 
system had proved to be a significant success after a rocky 
beginning. The outreach buses can serve half of the commuter 
population. The bus system has lessened automobile traffic both 
on the campus and in the town, making both safer for pedestrians. 
He said that the current schedule calls for the closing of the 
first core lots by September, 1976. 

There being no further business, the meeting adjourned 
at 12:20 p.m. 



ftladys^Keith Hardy 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4 519 

B & G Comm. 
3-18-75 

UM/Amherst — 

Improvement to 

Campus Movement 

Systems 

(Doc. T75-091) 



4 5 20 



COMMITTEE 



Executive 
Session 



UM/Amherst — 
Residence Hall 
Counseling 
Program 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT AFFAIRS 

March 18, 1975; 2:00 p.m. 

Campus Center 
University of Massachusetts/Amherst 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff: Chairman Shaler; Trustee 
Abrams; Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Mr. Keith, Associate Vice 
President for University Policy; Mr. Searson, General 
Counsel; Mr. Cahill, Staff Assistant 

UM/Amherst : Dr. Gage, Vice Chancellor for Student 
Affairs; Ms. Barbara L. Headrick, University Health 
Service; Ms. Marjorie Peace Lenn, Acting Assistant 
Director, Residential Life; Mr. Frederick Preston, 
Special Assistant to the Vice Chancellor for Student 
Affairs; Professor T. 0. Wilkinson, Alternate Faculty 
Representative 

UM/Boston : Mr. Tubbs, Vice Chancellor for Student Affaire 

UM/Worcester : Dr. Smith, Associate Dean for Academic 
Affairs 

Visitors : Mr. Frank Harrison, Ms. Karen Mangan, Mr. 
John O'Keefe 



The meeting was called to order at 2:10 p.m. Chairman 
Shaler declared an executive session, which lasted until 2:20 p.m. 
The executive session was followed by the first item on the 
regular agenda, the matter of the Residence Hall Counseling Pro- 
gram at the Amherst campus. 

Dr. Gage spoke first, and began by stating the con- 
viction of the Amherst campus that the residence hall counselors 
were an important resource. He said that education of students 
should be total: emotional and intellectual. Pursuant to this, 
he said, it was necessary to create a supportive environment and 
supportive services which supplement activities in the classroom. 
The campus is also committed to what he called the community 
development model in which the members of the community — in this 
case the residence hall residents — are encouraged to assess their 
own needs and use their own resources to meet these needs. 



I 



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I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

For these reasons, he said, the campus relies heavily on 
peer assistance, in which students are counselors of other students. 
This takes place under professional supervision and after appropri- 
ate training. He observed that students usually drop out of the 
University for personal, not academic, reasons and that the counsel- 
ing support system is part of the environment which helps students 
come to grips with such difficulties. 

Ms. Lenn added the observation that the other Student 
Affairs and academic departments are closely interrelated with the 
activities of the residence hall counseling system and make great 
use of it in getting information to the students. In response to 
a question, Ms. Lenn said that the residence hall counselors had 
heretofore received a tuition waiver and compensation from the 
state "03" account. 

Chairman Shaler observed that the tuition waiver appeared 
to be no longer possible as a compensation to the residence hall 
counselors, although he said that he hoped that the campus could 
come up, within a month, with a substitute form of compensation. 
The actual substitute, he said, was for the campuses to develop and 
was not an appropriate subject for speculation at this meeting. 
He said he wished to emphasize that the proposed abolition of the 
waiver in no way reflected adversely on the Committee's opinion of 
the value of the program. 

Mr. Keith praised the program highly, saying that he had 
reviewed the report carefully and had been extremely impressed, 
particularly with the training program and the way it is tied to the 
operations of the academic departments. He said he and the Presi- 
dent were in whole-hearted support of the program. 

Chairman Shaler reiterated his admiration for the program, 
and recalled that he had served as a residence hall counselor as a 
graduate student and was impressed by the far greater demands which 
are made of such persons today. 

Continuing his remarks on the report itself, Chairman 
Shaler said he admired the blend of the full report. He said it 
stresses outreach — the reaching of students by other students. He 
said also the report had revealed that the assistance given benefits 
the counselor as well as the student being counseled. He praised 
the report's candid admission of failures as well and its discussion 
of efforts to remedy them. 

The Chairman described the report as the first effort to 
find out the students' needs with polls and other direct means, 
and said the effort had confirmed what he said was the opinion of 
the Committee all along: that the students believed the student 
counseling system to be an important service. 



4521 

Stu. Affairs 
3-18-75 



UM/Amherst — 
Residence Hall 
Counseling 
Program 



4522 

Stu. Affairs 
3-18-75 

UM/Amherst — 
Residence Hall 
Counseling 
Program 

COMMITTEE 



Abolition of 
Tuition Waivers 
for Residence 
Hall Counselors 



Resolution of 
Support for 
Residence Hall 
Counseling 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Shaler observed, in response to a question by 
Trustee Abrams, that although the tuition waiver system had been 
used without problems in the past, the Legislature was expressing 
increasing concern about the loss of revenue to the general fund. 
Mr. Keith added that the Chancellor was concerned that the program 
could mushroom, and that others in positions analogous to that of 
the counselors might understandably ask for the same privilege. 

Mr. John O'Keefe, a student, suggested that abolition of 
the tuition waiver for residence hall counselors might place an 
added burden on the Residential Life system, and suggested that the 
proposed vote be tabled for further discussion. Chairman Shaler 
repeated that the Board was concerned with finding ways to support 
this program, but that the tuition waiver was felt not to be an 
appropriate vehicle. Any alternative, he said, was not for the 
Board to determine but to approve once such an alternative is 
developed by the campus. He added that the Legislature is in the 
process of studying the whole system of waivers. It was his view 
that the University should have its own house in order so as to 
avoid having an undesirable system forced on it. 

Chairman Shaler also said that the waiver abolition had 
been proposed at a previous meeting, and had been tabled at that 
time and studied for several months. He felt convinced that it had 
been adequately studied. 

After further brief discussion, a motion was made and 
seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
University of Massachusetts Tuition Waiver 
Policies (Trustee Doc. T75-075B) be amended by 
inserting after section 3.4 the following new 
section: 3.5 Tuition Waivers for Residence 

Counselors . 
Tuition waivers for residence counselors are 
abolished effective July 1, 1975. 

Following the vote, Trustee Abrams moved that the 
Committee recommend that the Board of Trustees express strong 
support for the residence hall counseling program. The motion 
was seconded and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
express strong support for the residence hall 
counseling -program, and express the hope that, 
as soon as possible, alternative means of 
supporting such counselors be developed. 



COMMITTEE 



1 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The next item on the agenda was the Annual Report of the 
Student Affairs Division of the Harbor Campus. The Chairman asked 
Mr. Tubbs to present the report. 

Mr. Tubbs stated that student affairs has historically 
had an extremely low priority on the Boston campus, and it was his 
hope that the report would supply information about what the division 
had been doing in the past year while giving an idea of the hopes 
and plans it had for the future. He said he would happily answer 
any questions which the Committee might have. 

Trustee Abrams asked whether the problems related to 
staffing health services had been cleared up. Mr. Tubbs replied 
that they had been; that a search committee was at work and would 
soon make some recommendations. Mr. Keith asked, first, whether 
the proposed Human Resource Center was still a high-priority project, 
and second, whether the division had any hope of securing sufficient 
staff in the future. 

Mr. Tubbs replied that the Chancellor had assured him that 
the Human Resource Center was still definitely a high-priority item. 
As for staff additions, he did not feel optimistic. In fact, he 
said, he was concerned that there might even be cutbacks in the 
future. He explained that this was a possibility in view of the 
absolute freeze on hiring, which ruled out replacement of persons 
who leave. He also noted that it was impossible now to add a 
director of counseling, and that the positions of director of health 
services and director of counseling would be combined in one person,; 
due to fiscal necessity. 

Chairman Shaler expressed his views on the positive and 
negative points of the report. The positive aspects, he said, were 
that the faculty is getting increasingly involved in student affairs, 
and that he could see that the desire previously expressed by the 
Board for an active outreach approach toward student needs was 
reaching fruition. On the negative side, the Chairman cited four 
key areas: prefreshman programs, veterans, disadvantaged students, 
and minority counseling. He said that the report of the division 
of student affairs revealed little or no student participation in 
these areas, which he viewed as desirable. 

On the subject of austerity, the Chairman observed that 
retrenchment was certainly necessary, but he wished to receive a 
report from the Boston campus at the April meeting outlining steps 
to be taken in shifting positions to make better use of staff 
resources. He also said he was still concerned about the missing 
30 positions, and said he wished to have the Chancellor's explanatior 
in April. Some of these, he said, appeared to have been used for 
admissions when they had been specifically earmarked for counseling. 

He also observed that, at a recent meeting, the Committee 
had heard reports from both campuses on the use of staff in student 



4523 

Stu. Affairs 
3-18-75 



UM/Boston — ) 
Annual Report of 
Student Affairs 
Division 



4 524 

Stu. Affairs 
3-18-75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



UM/Boston — affairs. At that meeting the Amherst campus had reported substan- 
Annual Report of tial reallocation of staff in an effort to better meet the needs 



Student Affairs 
Division 

COMMITTEE 



UM/Worcester — 
Financial Aid 
for Medical 
Students 



UM/Amherst — 
Universal 
Resource Fee 



of the students. This had been accomplished, he pointed out, with- 
out addition of new staff. 

The students present raised several questions about the 
Boston campus's report. Chairman Shaler pointed out that Mr. Tubbs 
was the first Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs at the Boston 
campus. Consequently, he said, Mr. Tubbs did not enter into a 
situation which had any structure set up in advance. It had been 
his responsibility to draw a semblance of order out of disorder. 
Mr. Keith added that it had been Mr. Tubbs' first priority to 
impose some structure on the Division of Student Affairs. Now, he 
said, his task was to begin to concentrate on content, but that 
nine years of neglect could not be undone overnight. 

There being no other discussion of this matter, Chairman 
Shaler took note of the presence of Dr. Smith from the Worcester 
campus, and asked him if he had any remarks to make to the Committee. 
Dr. Smith said that the Worcester campus was to have made a report 
to the Committee on the status and problems of financial aid for 
medical students. He said that as a result of confusion due to 
former Chancellor Soutter's sudden retirement, the report was not 
ready. He promised, however, to have these difficulties ironed out 
and to have a report on problems of financial aid to medical stu- 
dents ready in time for the Committee's April meeting. 

The Chairman remarked that Mr. Gartenberg, University 
Budget Director, was also working on these problems. 

Trustee Abrams asked whether it would be appropriate 
for the Committee to discuss a suggestion he had heard of raising 
tuition because of the drop in residence hall occupancy. 

Chairman Shaler said that he had received several mail- 
ings on the subject of University austerity moves. He made the 
point that those who oppose the Universal Resource Fee should be 
prepared to propose viable alternatives, since the University has 
debts which cannot be ignored. He added that several of the pro- 
posals he had heard did not seem realistic. 

Dr. Gage informed the Committee that he would be prepared 
for a full discussion of this matter, with documentation, at the 
Committee's next meeting. 

There was nothing further to come before the Committee, 
and upon a motion made and seconded, the meeting was declared 
adjourned at 3:45 p.m. 



^JladyJ Keith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



COMMITTEE 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 

FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

March 19, 1975; 10:00 a.m. 

Office of the President, University of Massachusetts 
One Washington Mall, Boston, Massachusetts 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Troy, President 

Wood; Trustees Breyer and Steed; Mr. Callahan, represent- 
ing Trustee Anrig; Ms. Flannery, representing Trustee 
Bicknell; Secretary Hardy, Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice Presi- 
dent for Academic Affairs 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Gluckstern, Vice 
Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Chappell , 
Acting Dean of the Graduate School; Professor Fletcher, 
Faculty Representative; Mr. Lindsey, Graduate Student 
Representative 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Spaethling, Vice 
Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost 

UM/Worcester : Acting Dean Butcher; Dr. Smith, Associate 
Dean for Academic Affairs and Provost 



The meeting was called to order at 10:05 a.m. Chairman 
Troy called on Mr. Lynton to speak to the first three items on the 
agenda, tenure awards on the three campuses. Mr. Lynton informed 
the Committee that the President had had an unexpected commitment 
and would be a little late. He began by reading some general com- 
ments of the President on the subject of tenure which were addressed 
to criteria and some of the related issues. "The award of tenure," 
the comments said, "... requires a thorough and careful review of 
the candidate's qualifications and an assessment of his or her role 
in meeting the existing and long-range plans of the institution." 
Other portions of this memorandum mentioned the need for tenure 
decisions to be integrated with the five-year plans of campus, 
school or college, and department. The need was cited to keep open 
the University's opportunities to attract and acquire highly talented 
faculty members in years to come. 

Mr. Lynton said that the total number of awards for tenure 
to come before the Committee for concurrence could not all be dealt 



4525 



UM/Amherst, 
UM/Boston, and 
UM/Worcester — 
Tenure Recom- 
mendations 



4526 



F & EP Comm. 
3-19-75 

UM/Amherst — 
Tenure Recom- 
mendations 

COMMITTEE 

UM/Boston — 
Tenure Recom- 
mendations 



UM/Worcester- 
Tenure Recom- 
mendations 



Criteria in 
Awards of 
Tenure 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

with today and that the April meeting of the Committee would 
complete the task. The first group of the President's decisions 
for tenure awards at UM/Amherst and Boston were then presented. 

After Mr. Lynton introduced the Boston recommendations, 
Chancellor Golino interposed a question about an appointment to 
tenure of a person holding the rank of assistant professor for a 
number of years who was not at the same time recommended for a 
promotion to the rank of associate professor. Both Mr. Lynton 
and Chairman Troy remarked that it was the firm policy of the 
Committee and the desire of the President not to treat these issues 
separately. 

Some of Chancellor Golino 's recommendations, said Mr. 
Lynton, were still under consideration primarily because the 
departments had not made clear the proposed relationships between 
departmental plans and the effect of their recommendations for 
tenure. President Wood underscored this point by saying that he 
took planning very seriously, and he wanted to be sure the depart- 
ments understood the necessary connection between tenure and 
planning. 

Chairman Troy raised the question of duplication between 
departments in the colleges, as for example the two history depart- 
ments of Colleges I and II. Both Chancellor Golino and Mr. 
Spaethling addressed the need to clarify these issues of relation- 
ships between departments across the colleges. President Wood 
remarked tha t the Boston campus had been using the college system 
for three years, and that it was now extremely desirable for the 
colleges to develop greater disciplinary differentiation. 

Mr. Lynton next addressed the President's tenure awards 
for the Worcester campus. He observed that these were the first 
such annual tenure recommendations for the Worcester campus, and 
said that, because the Medical School was being built, the 
criterion of institutional need was as yet less critical than at 
the other campuses. As of next year, however, this criterion will 
have to be addressed more carefully. 

Following these general remarks, a discussion ensued 
about the criterion of institutional need. Several campus repre- 
sentatives remarked that this was felt to be a new criterion and 
did not formally exist as recently as two years ago; in the past, 
they said, individual merit was the primary consideration. Chair- 
man Troy replied that the criterion of institutional need was not 
"wholly new," that it had always been implicitly a factor. 

Mr. Lynton made the point that institutional need is not 
only necessary, but that it can be more clearly defined than 
individual qualifications. Trustee Breyer suggested that institu- 
tional need, if clearly set forth, should have the effect of reduc- 
ing anxiety on the part of faculty members, since the realities 



P 



P 



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COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



with respect to this criterion could be made clear to all. 

President Wood stated that the administration had, in 
fact, been gradual in the application of this criterion, that 
the Trustees had first approved the criterion of institutional 
need in 1972. He underlined the necessity for the criterion, and 
said that the alternative would be disastrous. Chancellor Golino 
observed that there had been "a growing spree" nationally of tenure 
awards based entirely on merit, and that the criterion of institu- 
tional need was an attempt to come to grips with the problem of 
competing claims of merit. 

Professor Fletcher cited what he viewed as the importance, 
in coming years, of early assessment and making the hard decisions 
in individual tenure cases far enough in advance of the end of the 
probational period to give those faculty members with poorer chances 
for tenure an opportunity to explore other options. Mr. Gluckstern 
said it was also important to make careful appointment decisions, 
since this decision is the last real opportunity for discretion by 
an institution. 

On this point, Chairman Troy asked about consistency and 
coherence in hiring practices of the Boston campus, and Mr. Spaeth- 
ling replied that it varied among departments and levels. Chan- 
cellor Golino cited the importance, with respect to such problems, 
of the Vice Chancellor being involved in the initial screening 
process . 

Chancellor Golino raised the question of the mission and 
responsibility of the Boston campus. In the past, he said, it had 
been the operating assumption on the Boston campus that it should 
not be overly concerned with scholarship. Chairman Troy stated the 
view that there could be no question that the Boston Campus should 
be interested in the pursuit of academic excellence. There is more 
time now in the working life of an academician for scholarship than 
there ever was, he said, and the Boston campus must be expected to 
live up to high standards to the same extent as the other campuses. 

Mr. Lynton emphasized the importance of good teaching as 
a criterion, but also pointed out that scholarship is not limited 
narrowly to the pursuit of new knowledge, but can also consist of 
creative pedagogical development and other scholarly efforts. 

Acting Dean Butcher offered a summation of the appoint- 
ment system used at the Medical School which, he pointed out, 
differs in process from the other two campuses. The primary 
recommendation for the appointment of new faculty is the responsi- 
bility of the department chairman, which then is sent to the 
Executive Committee of the faculty for review and recommendation. 



4527 

F & EP Comm, 
3-19-75 

Criteria in 
Awards of 
Tenure 



4 528 

F & EP Comm. 
3-19-75 

Executive 
Session 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Amherst — 
Tenure Offer to 
Robert H. 
Graham as Pro- 
fessor of Com- 
puter and 
Information 
Science 
(Doc. T75-090) 



UM/Boston — 
Tenure Appoint- 
ment, College 
of Professional 
Studies 
(Doc. T75-087) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

With the completion of the general discussion, a motion 
was made that the Committee go into executive session for the 
purpose of discussion of individual cases at 11:30 a.m. The motion 
was seconded and it was 

VOTED : To go into executive session for the purpose of 
discussing individual tenure appointments at the 
Amherst, Boston, and Worcester campuses. 



The executive session ended at 1:35 p 



m. 



and the Chairman 



indicated that the Committee had agreed to postpone any recommenda- 
tion to the full Board until all of the tenure decisions of the 
President had been discussed for the Committee's concurrence 
which would be completed at the Committee's April meeting. 

He then turned the meeting to item four on the agenda, 
Tenure Offer to Robert H. Graham as Professor of Computer and 
Information Science, University of Massachusetts at Amherst (Doc. 
T75-090) . Mr. Lynton informed the Committee that careful critical 
review must be given to all new appointments with tenure, and that, 
in general, vacancies should be filled at a junior level. He said, 
however, that in Mr. Graham's case, such an offer was fully 
justified in view of the criterion of institutional need. Mr. 
Gluckstern stated that the Department of Computer and Information 
Science was one of the strongest on the campus and in the country. 
The previous head had wished to devote himself to further scholar- 
ship, and a long and careful search had taken place for a successor 
He said he believed Mr. Graham to be a strong research scholar 
whose capabilities would greatly improve the balance of the depart- 
ment. A motion was made, seconded, and it was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 

concur with the proposed appointment with tenure 
of Robert H. Graham as Professor of Computer 
and Information Science at the University of 
Massachusetts at Amherst, as contained in Doc. 
T75-090. 

The Chairman next directed the Committee's attention to 
the matter of Tenure Appointments, College of Professional Studies , 
University of Massachusetts at Boston (Doc. T75-087) . Speaking 
for the campus, Mr. Spaethling informed the Committee that two 
important criteria had been followed: (1) institutional need, which 
in this case was to provide several core faculty members in three 
important areas; and (2) the distinction of the candidates. He 
observed that these persons had tenure in their respective institu- 
tions and could not have been tempted to come to the University 
without the offer of tenure included in the proposal. He said he 
and the Chancellor, having interviewed the candidates, concluded 
that Dean Freeland and Professor Patterson had done an outstanding 
job of recruiting. 



I 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

There was no further discussion, and after a motion was 
made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
concur with the following appointments with 
tenure in the Management Program of the College 
of Professional Studies of the University of 
Massachusetts at Boston: Dr. Shirley M. 
Arbesfeld, as Associate Professor; Dr. Gunther 
Boroschek, as Professor; and Dr. Peter J. McClure, 
as Professor; all as contained in Doc. T75-087. 

Mr. Lynton spoke of the next item of the regular agenda, 
the Academic Organization of the Medical School (Doc. T75-092) . 
He recalled that at its October meeting, the Committee had dis- 
cussed this matter, and had asked Chancellor Soutter to submit a 
list of proposed departments. The Chancellor's list had included 
a possible 68 departments. This list was under serious, critical 
review at the Medical School, Mr. Lynton said, and it was hoped that 
the review could be completed by the end of the semester. One of 
the essential departments on the list, however, was that of 
Pediatrics . 

Acting Dean Butcher added that Pediatrics is a recognized 
academic department in all 113 medical schools in the country. He 
described such a department as one with clear-cut academic roles, 
as an administrative entity, and as a clincial service. This 
department, he said, was expected to lean heavily toward the area 
of primary care. 

Ms. Flannery, representing Trustee Bicknell, asked 
whether the structure of the proposed department had been determined 
She said Trustee Bicknell agreed with the necessity of a department 
of pediatrics, and indeed felt that its focus should be primary 
care and that it should be closely tied in with the Department of 
Family Practice. She also suggested that the description of the 
department which was given to the Trustees in November 1974 was 
perhaps too "classical," and wondered if that description was being 
ratified along with the department itself. 

Acting Dean Butcher stated that the description provided 
at that time had not been an official planning document. He said 
that it was expected that more than half of the internships and 
residencies in pediatrics would be in primary care. He took 
exception to the view that pediatrics should be allied mainly with 
the Department of Family Practice, and said he believed it should 
also be strongly allied with the Department of Medicine and the 
Department of Community Medicine. In response to Ms. Flannery' s 
question as to whether there would be subdivisions within the 
department, Acting Dean Butcher said that individuals within the 
Department would certainly concentrate on different areas, but that 
Dr. Hanshaw, whose appointment as Chairman of the Pediatrics 



4 529 

F & EP Comm. 
3-19-75 



UM/Boston — 
Tenure Appoint- 
ments, College 
of Professional 
Studies 
(Doc. T75-087) 



UM/Worc ester — 
Academic Organi- 
zation of the 
Medical School 
(Doc. T75-092) 



Structure of 
Department of 
Pediatrics 



4 5 30 



F & EP Comm. 
3-19-75 

Structure of 
Department of 
Pediatrics 

COMMITTEE 



UM/Worc ester — 
Appointments 
with Tenure 
(Doc. T75-093 & 
Doc. T75-094) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Department, was to be considered later in the meeting, had not 
requested any specific appointments. He added, however, that he 
expected future appointments for the Department of Pediatrics to 
reflect a mixture of primary care and subspecialties. 

Ms. Flannery stated that Trustee Bicknell would like to 
go on record as favoring the linkup of pediatrics with child 
developmental problems. Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
establish a Department of Pediatrics at the 
University of Massachusetts Medical School, as 
set forth in Doc. T75-092. 

The next item on the agenda consisted of two proposed 
Appointments with Tenure, University of Massachusetts at Worcester 
(Doc. T75-093 and T75-094) . Speaking of the proposed appointments, 
Acting Dean Butcher said that the Medical School was fortunate to 
attract two such eminent individuals. Dr. Braverman was a 
specialist in endocrinology and nuclear medicine, and had done 
important work in the area of thyroid diseases. Dr. Hanshaw, he 
said, was an outstanding pediatrician clinically, administratively, 
and in terms of research, and was a specialist in the area of 
virology and microbiology. He described him as a generalist in 
terms of pediatrics, and said that he was a true academician. 
Dr. Hanshaw was expected, said Acting Dean Butcher, to take a 
leading role in the development of the Department of Pediatrics 
and in the overall primary care program of the Medical School. 

Ms. Flannery asked, since Acting Dean Butcher had men- 
tioned that Dr. Braverman was expected to become Chairman of the 
Department of Nuclear Medicine, whether a Department of Nuclear 
Medicine had been created. Mr. Lynton replied that it had not, but 
would be placed before the Committee at its next meeting. There 
was no further discussion, and after a motion was made and seconded 
it was 



I 



! 



VOTED : 



and it was 
VOTED : 



To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
concur with the proposed appointment with tenure 
of Dr. Lewis E. Braverman as Professor of 
Medicine at the University of Massachusetts 
Medical School, as set forth in Doc. T75-093. 



To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
concur with the proposed appointment with tenure 
of Dr. James B. Hanshaw as Professor of 
Pediatrics at the University of Massachusetts 
Medical School, as set forth in Doc. T75-094. 



I 



COMMITTEE 



! 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The final item of the agenda was a report from the Amherst 
campus on the Institute for Man and Environment. Mr. Gluckstern 
informed the Committee that the Institute had been formed three and 
one-half years earlier. It had had high hopes, he said, but prob- 
ably had been too ambitious at the beginning in view of conditions 
which had existed on the campus at the time. 

The Institute had experienced a change of leadership, he 
said, and under Dr. Zube had succeeded in narrowing its focus in 
terms of its academic function — development of courses — and its 
cooperative effort in helping state and local government with their 
problems. The cooperative function also has educational value. 
He said the Institute assists with the evaluation of environmental 
impact studies for the state Department of Natural Resources. 

Mr. Gluckstern added that Professor Hugh Davis, of the 
Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning, was 
serving both as Associate Director of the Institute and as Assistant 
Secretary of the state Office of Environmental Affairs. 

Chairman Troy asked which of the two functions — service or 
development of academic courses — was the most heavily emphasized. 
Mr. Gluckstern replied that the Institute develops courses for 
persons who are interested in environmental matters, but does not 
offer majors. He described the Institute as a mixture. He said 
its academic role is to stimulate interdisciplinary courses, while 
having a reasonably strong compact with state and local government. 

After further discussion of the Institute of Man and 
Environment, a motion was made that the meeting be adjourned. 
There was no objection, the Chairman declared the meeting adjourned 
at 2:00 p.m. 



^ladysfl Keith Hardy V 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4531 

F & EP Comm. 
3-19-75 

UM/Amherst — 
Report on 
Institute for 
Man and 
Environment 



4532 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Amherst — 
Married Student 
Housing Petition 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF THE TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

March 27, 1975; 10:00 a.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Gordon, President 
Wood; Trustees Knowles, Rowland, Spiller, Sullivan; 
Treasurer Johnson; Mr. Heiney, Assistant Treasurer; 
Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Mrs. Hanson, Assistant Budget 
Director; Mr. Keith, Associate Vice President; Mr. 
Searson, General Counsel; Mr. Lewis, Staff Assistant 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Gulko, Budget 
Director 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Hamilton, Vice Chan- 
cellor for Administration and Finance 

UM/Worcester : Mr. Cathey, Controller; Dr. Goodman 

Invited Guests : Mr. Joseph Albert, Insurance Advisor; 
Mr. Eugene Freedman, Mr. Ackley, Mr. Uer, representatives 
of Coopers and Lybrand, Inc. 



The meeting was called to order at 10:05 a.m. 

The first item, under Old Business, was the matter of 
the Married Students Housing Petition. Chairman Gordon said it 
was his understanding that the students who had petitioned the 
Committee expected a vote of the Board on April 2. He asked 
Chancellor Bromery what the Amherst campus's proposal would be. 
The Chancellor replied that the campus would stand by the fee-based 
budget which was approved by the Trustees in June 1974. He said 
further discussions had taken place with the tenants group since 
the Committee's last meeting and had discussed with them all the 
allegations made before the Committee. 

Chancellor Bromery explained the historical nature of 
the problem, and reviewed the principal factors in the determination 
of the rent structure: the need to build a sufficient reserve to 
make needed repairs in the older units, and the need to equalize 
the rent structure between the three married student housing 
complexes . 



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COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On the question of representation of students, Chancellor 
Bromery reiterated that the students had agreed to the rent 
structure at the time the decision was made and added that, while 
it may be true that the student agreement with that decision did 
not reflect this group's desires, the present group is composed of 
about 25 out of 396 married student tenants. He also denied the 
charge made by the students that there had been illegal commingling 
of funds, and cited the campus's response which had been presented 
to the Committee. 

Chancellor Bromery also stated that he was prepared to 
discuss a proposal which had been put forward by the students for 
a cooperative management of the housing, but he said he believed 
that the rents should be taken out of escrow first. 

Following further discussion, a motion was made and 
seconded, and it was 

VOTED ; To reaffirm the Fee-Based Budget as it pertains 
to rents for the Amherst campus, which was 
approved by the Board of Trustees on June 5, 
1974: to direct the Chancellor to so inform the 
University of Massachusetts Tenants Association; 
and to enter into discussions with the Associa- 
tion concerning a release of the rental escrow 
accounts. Further, to suggest to the Chancellor 
to continue exploration of the Association's 
proposal for a cooperative management system 
for married students housing. 

The second item was that of the report of the University 
insurance advisor, Mr. Joseph Albert, on the proposed University- 
wide General Liability Insurance (Doc. T75-101) . Mr. Albert 
informed the Committee that while negotiations were continuing on 
the proposed program, they were close to conclusion. He said he 
had come before the Committee with the written proposal which he 
had distributed because he felt optimistic that what was sought 
could be achieved . 

He sketched the history of his efforts, observing that 
he had drawn specifications for insurance for Trustees and Univer- 
sity employees. These specifications had attempted to cover every 
possible exposure. The bidding process had been extremely poor, 
he pointed out, and as a result the firm of Marsh and McLennan, 
which had offered the nearest thing to the desired coverage, had 
been given a broker of record letter to negotiate with insurance 
companies. Marsh and McLennan returned with amendments, and nego- 
tiations had continued to the present point. He said the package 
had been broadened and the cost reduced. 



4533 



Fin. Comm. 
3-27-75 

UM/Amherst — 
Married Student 
Housing Petition 



University-wide 
General Liabil- 
ity Insurance 
(Doc. T75-101) 






4 5 34 

Finance Comm. 
3-27-75 

University-wide 
General Liabil- 
ity Insurance 
(Doc. T75-101) 

COMMITTEE 



UM/ Wore ester — 

Insurance 

Program 

(Doc. T75-097) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Albert said that it had become necessary to negotiate 
three policies, instead of the one complete policy which had been 
specified in the beginning, and that the net cost was about 
$43,000.00 a year. Subtracting the piecemeal coverage which the 
University had at present, the net increase in cost to the Univer- 
sity would be about $37,000.00. 

A lengthy discussion took place, during which Mr. Albert 
provided substantial additional information about the specifics 
of the proposed program. 

He said that the amount of the insurance was in excess 
of $5 million, which he said could be cut back. He stated that 
there were various deductibles, and that it was necessary for the 
Board to decide whether individuals or the University would pay 
these deductibles in the event of a claim. In response to 
question from the Chairman, Mr. Albert stated that it was not 
possible to secure a commitment for a fixed term, that such commit- 
ments are not made, and that each of the policies has a 60-day 
cancellation provision which the insurer could exercise if he 
were to become dissatisfied with the premium. 

Mr. Albert informed the Committee that the three companies 
involved were: Home Insurance Company, which was to write the 
primary insurance liability; First State, which was to write the 
umbrella liability; and CNA, which was to write the wrongful acts 
liability. 

At the conclusion of further discussion a motion was 
made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To authorize the University insurance advisor, 
Mr. Joseph H. Albert, to finalize an agreement 
for a University-wide general liability 
insurance program at a cost not to exceed that 
contained in Doc. T75-101, subject to the 
approval of University General Counsel and 
the Treasurer. 

Trustee Spiller expressed the concern that the Trustees 
should address the questions of whether, how, and under what 
circumstances the University would pay the deductibles and legal 
fees of employees in the event of a claim. At his suggestion, the 
University counsel was asked to look into these matters as soon 
as possible and report to the Committee. 

The next item on the agenda was the matter of the UM / 
Worcester Insurance Program (Doc. T75-097). Mr. Albert recapit- 
ulated the matter, saying that at present the Medical School had 
no insurance at all, except what individuals may be buying, and 
that the University-wide General Liability Program would not cover 
the Worcester campus. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



He had been asked, at a meeting with Medical School staff, 
Assistant Counsel O'Leary, and members of the President's staff, to 
seek a Hospital Professional Liability Policy including the Medical 
School plus all personnel and students, but excluding doctors. As 
for the doctors, he said he had been asked to seek the availability 
of insurance for individual doctors by the insurer, with premiums 
to be paid by the doctors themselves. 

Mr. Albert pointed out to the Committee that the state 
of the market was such that it might prove difficult to secure 
this program, but that he was optimistic. Mrs. Hanson asked 
whether the difficulty of getting malpractice insurance would prove 
a stumbling block to getting the more standard professional liabil- 
ity insurance. Mr. Albert replied that he could not know the 
answer before discussions were opened with insurers, but he said it 
was desirable to link the two aspects of the program. 

Mr. Albert said the amount of the individual professional 
liability insurance was to be in excess of $1 million. Trustee 
Rowland questioned whether that amount would be adequate in view 
of the large judgments being awarded. Mr. Albert replied that the 
budget estimates were qualified, and were months old but that he 
would review this question further. He added that it was difficult 
to say what the minimum coverage should be without first beginning 
to negotiate to find out what the rates would be. The Chairman 
observed that it was a matter of trying to trade off the amount of 
coverage desired and required against the cost. 

Treasurer Johnson initiated a discussion of the matter 
of funding this insurance program. As far as he could see, he 
said, the only feasible source of funds was the trust fund interest 
account. He observed that the total cost for this program and 
the general, University-wide program was between $100,000.00 and 
$125,000.00. In order to fund these programs through the trust 
fund interest account, he said, it might prove to be necessary to 
cut some other programs. He added, however, that the insurance 
was of the highest priority. He stressed that these programs 
constituted a major new commitment which would grow more costly as 
time passed. 

Mrs. Hanson asked whether these costs could eventually 
be built into the hospital structure to avoid placing a great 
drain on the other campuses. Treasurer Johnson replied that there 
was always a possibility that some other means of funding the 
programs could be found in the future, but he believed that the 
trust fund interest account would have to carry the load for the 
first few years. The Chairman emphasized the extreme high priority 
of this insurance, and said the program must be secured before a 
single patient enters the hospital. He said that some time in the 
future the cost might have to be built into the rate structure of 
the hospital, and said that some thought should be given to this 
eventuality. Upon motion made and seconded, it was 



4 535 



Finance Comm. 
3-27-75 

UM/ Wo re ester — 

Insurance 

Program 

(Doc. T75-097) 



4536 

Finance Comm. 
3-27-75 

UM/Worc ester — 

Insurance 

Program 

(Doc. T75-097) 

COMMITTEE 



Ohio Land Sale 



UM/Worc ester — 
Invitation for 
Bids for a 
Branch Bank 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
authorize Joseph H. Albert, in consultation 
with the Acting Dean, to commence negotiations 
to obtain an insurance program for the University 
of Massachusetts at Worcester as outlined in 
Trustee Document T75-097; provided, however, 
that no insurance shall be purchased without 
the prior approval of the Board of Trustees. 

Mr. Albert said he would try to resolve the negotiations 
in April, and would report to the Committee at that time. The 
Chairman complimented him for his work. 

The next agenda item was that of the Ohio Land Sale . 
The President stated that it was important for the principals 
from Nationwide Development to come to Boston to discuss all 
options, and for him to report to the Committee as soon as possible. 
At this point, he said, the University could not do anything 
except negotiate. The Chairman said that he wished not to take 
any action at this meeting on the matter because he was not 
familiar enough with it. Treasurer Johnson observed that Nation- 
wide, the prospective buyers of the land which had been willed 
to the University by the late Murray D. Lincoln, wanted changes 
in the agreement, which he said leads to the process of 
negotiation. 

Trustee Knowles pointed out to the Committee that if the 
University were to rescind the purchase agreement authorized in 
1973, it would have to do so by September 1975 or well before. All 
present agreed to this necessity. Trustee Knowles also made 
several points about the property in question. She said there 
were no serious flood problems and felt that the land was more 
valuable than it was in 1973. She stated her strong feeling that 
the two parcels should not be separated. The Chairman took note 
of Trustee Knowles 's remarks and said it was his feeling that no 
harm would be done by waiting until the Committee's next meeting 
before acting. 

The meeting turned next to a proposed vote authorizing 
the Acting Dean, Chancellor, or any designee thereof to invite 
bids for the purpose of providing banking services on the 
Worcester campus. Mr. Cathey told the Committee that the Medical 
School had had many queries from area banks about the possibility 
of opening a branch on the campus. 



Now, he said, the hospital building had reached a point 
where it was appropriate to solicit bids for this purpose. 
Trustee Spiller expressed the view that it was premature to 
solicit bids at this time. He said the University should wait 
at least a year for the hospital to be fully functioning, at which 
time it would have something to sell to prospective bidders. 
Mr. Cathey said he thought it was essential to have this service 



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COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

in the first year, although not on the first day. Mr. Spiller 
reiterated his view, and upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To table the proposed authorization for solici- 
tation of bids for the provision of a branch 
bank on the Worcester campus for a period of 
six months, at which time the Worcester campus 
may renew the proposal. 

The Committee next turned to an amendment to Tuition 
Waiver Policies (Doc. T75-075B) . Vice President Keith, speaking 
for the Student Affairs Committee, explained that residence hall 
counselors on the Amherst campus had been receiving both compensa- 
tion from state funds and a tuition waiver. The Student Affairs 
Committee had decided that to continue the tuition waiver would be 
to provide a precedent whereby other students who were receiving 
payment for services might also understandably ask for a tuition 
waiver . 

He said that, while the Committee was extremely impressed 
with the residence hall counseling system, and had directed the 
campus to seek other means of supporting it, it had felt compelled 
to recommend discontinuation of this form of compensation. Upon 
motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To concur in the recommendation of the Student 
Affairs Committee that the Board of Trustees 
amend the University tuition waiver policies 
(Doc. T75-075B) by inserting after Section 3.4 
the following new section: 

3 . 5 Tuition Waivers for Residence Counselors . 

Tuition waivers for residence counselors are 
abolished effective July 1, 1975. 

Turning to the next item, the Chairman stated that the 
President would address himself to the matter of Policy Guidelines 
for the Administration of Grants and Contracts. President Wood 
reminded the Committee that he had said at the last Board meeting 
that he would continue to make administrative changes based on the 
findings which came out of the audit of the School of Education. 
He distributed to the Committee a memorandum describing some 
specific steps to be taken. 

He noted that a review of administrative practices had 
been going on for two years. He said that in February 1975 the 
Treasurer had given him a specific proposal for such guidelines 
which had been reviewed by the respective campuses. After a second 
round of campus discussions, he said, he proposed to implement the 
guidelines shortly. He said he had determined to go forward in 
two stages: (1) to deal with grants which came to the University 
from the federal government and philanthropic institutions for 



4537 

Finance Comm. 
3-27-75 

UM/Worcester — 
Invitation for 
Bids for a 
Branch Bank 



Amendment to 
Tuition Waiver 
Policies 
(Doc. T75-075B) 



Administrative 
Policy Guide- 
lines for Grants 
and Contracts 



4 538 

Finance Comm. 
3-27-75 

Administrative 
Policy Guide- 
lines for 
Grants and 

Con- COMMITTEE 

tracts 



Executive 
Session 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

academic programs, and (2) to cover contracts, leases and other 
actions of an essentially administrative nature. He outlined 
some of the guidelines proposed. Upon motion made and seconded, 
it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
take note of the action of the President in 
the establishment of policy guidelines, 
organizational arrangements and administrative 
procedures governing academic program contracts 
and grants, involving research, service, and 
training activities; that it concur in the 
same and ask that their implementation receive 
the highest priority on all campuses. 

A motion was made to go into executive session, and 
upon a second to the motion, it was 

VOTED : To go into executive session to hear a status 
report on the audit of the School of Education 
at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. 

The executive session began at 12:15 p.m. and the 
meeting was adjourned at 12:55 p.m. 



/COadyi Keith Hardy Q 






Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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COMMITTEE 



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4 539 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

April 2, 1975; 11:00 a.m. 

Campus Center, Room 911-15 
University of Massachusetts/Amherst 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Healey, President 
Wood; Trustees Carlson, Croce, Gordon, Rowland, Shaler, 
Troy; Secretary Hardy, Treasurer Johnson; Mr. Mehegan, 
recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice Presi- 
dent for Academic Affairs; Father Walsh, Academic Advisor 
to the President; Mr. Bench, Assistant Counsel; Mr. White, 
Assistant to the President 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Professor Fletcher, 
Faculty Representative; Mr. Lindsey, Graduate Student 
Representative 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Professor Gagnon, Faculty 
Representative 

UM/Worcester : Acting Dean Butcher; Mr. Stockwell, 
Hospital Director and Associate Dean for Administration 

Invited Guests : Mr. Wallace Ackley of Coopers & Lybrand; 
Mr. Peter Wyman, student at the Medical School 



The meeting was called to order by Chairman Healey at 
11:10 a.m. He called first upon Father Walsh to brief the Com- 
mittee on the first matter, the Review of Governance Document 
(Doc. T75-099) . Father Walsh reminded the Committee when the 
Trustees had adopted the Governance Document (T73-098) in April 1973, 
they had adopted that it be evaluated two years from its date of 
adoption. 

A meeting of a committee with representatives of all 
governing bodies had been held for this purpose at the Office of 
the President. There had been varied discussion at this meeting, 
although only the Faculty Senate had submitted suggestions in 
advance. 

It had been the sense of the Committee that problems 
experienced with the statement were campus problems which required 
solution at the campus level, and that it would be inappropriate to 
attempt to solve them through revision of the document itself. 



Review of 
Governance 
Document 
(Doc. T75-099) 



4 5 40 



Exec. Comm. 
4-2-75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Review of 
Governance 
Document 
(Doc. T75-099) 

COMMITTEE 



Father Walsh noted that the President had transmitted a 
memorandum to the Chancellors asking that campus-level implementa- 
tion procedures be submitted to the Trustees by October 1975. 
Father Walsh added that the Committee had voted to recommend only 
one change in the document, amendment of the wording in Section II, 
D.3 to read "working days." 

Trustee Shaler observed that this change would extend 
the limits of consideration of policy recommendations to nearly a 
hundred days, and asked if that was too long. The observation was 
made that these periods are maximums and that administration can 
always act more quickly on matters which are passed along. 

There was further brief discussion, followed by a motion, 
The motion was seconded and it was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
Part II. D.3 of Document T73-098 be amended 
as follows: 



The Chancellor, the President and the Board 
of Trustees may approve recommendations from 
the campus governing bodies at any time. Sub- 
ject to precedents established by components of 
each campus and/or the restraints and procedures 
specified in their constitutions and in accordance 
with the preceding statements of primary responsi- 
bility (Section I.B. of this statement), recom- 
mendations adopted by the campus will become policy 
unless (1) disapproved or sent back for reconsider- 
ation by the Chancellor within twenty working days 
of receipt of notification from the governing body; 
(2) disapproved, sent back for reconsideration, or 
deferred by the President within twenty working 
days of receipt of notification of the Chancellor's 
approval or within twenty working days following 
the expiration of the twenty-day period for the 
Chancellor's consideration; (3) disapproved by the 
President during a special thirty-working-day 
deferral period (if the President chooses to defer 
his decision he will notify the governing body; 
the deferral period will begin at the end of the 
President's initial twenty-working-day period of 
consideration) ; (4) disapproved by the Board of 
Trustees within these specified time limitations. 
The governing bodies will notify the Chancellor, 
the President, and the Board of Trustees of their 
action as soon as possible after their adoption. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Any matter not acted upon within seventy working 
days of receipt of notification by the Chancellor 
of an action by a governing body will be taken as 
approved by the Board of Trustees. When a recom- 
mendation is disapproved, the governing body will 
receive written reasons in detail for the adverse 
decision. 

The next item on the agenda consisted of Worcester Campus 
Position Classifications (Doc. T75-098) . Mr. Stockwell described 



the proposed positions to the Committee, and said the descriptions 
and ranges had been carefully worked out in cooperation with the 
President's office. Chairman Healey asked Acting Dean Butcher if 
the proposed positions were essential, and if they conformed with 
established practice in comparable medical centers. Dr. Butcher 
confirmed that the positions were standard and essential. 

Trustee Croce asked whether, when the teaching hospital 
budget becomes separate from that of the Medical School, the proposec 
positions will still be part of the hospital budget. This would be 
desirable, he said, for the sake of third-party payments. Mr. 
Stockwell replied affirmatively. 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 

approve the Classifications of Position Titles, 
UM/Worcester , as contained in Doc. T75-098. 

The Chairman next turned to two proposed Personnel Actions 
for UM/Worcester (Docs. T75-100, T75-102) . Upon motions made 
and seconded, it was 



VOTED : 



To approve the prospective appointment and terms 
of employment as set forth in Trustee Document 
T75-102, said stated components of compensation 
to be renegotiated and submitted to the Board of 
Trustees for its approval not later than July 1, 
1975; further that the Board of Trustees authorize 
the preparation and filing of any documents nec- 
essary for the implementation of this vote. 



and it was 



VOTED : To confirm and approve the personnal action and 
salary adjustment, UM/Worcester, as detailed in 
Doc. T75-100. 

President Wood next addressed the Committee on a matter 
not on the formal agenda, a proposed vote on the status of former 
Chancellor Soutter of the Worcester campus. President Wood told 
the Committee that Dr. Soutter could not be an active professor once 



4 541 

Exec. Comm. 
4-2-75 

Review of 
Governance 
Document 
(Doc. T75-099) 



UM/Worcester — 
Position Classi- • 
f ications 
(Doc. T75-098) 



UM/Worcester — 
Personnel Actions 
(Docs. T75-100, 
T75-102) 



Honorary Title 
for Former 
Chancellor 
Soutter 



4 542 



Exec. Coram. 
4-2-75 

Honorary Title 
for Former 
Chancellor 
Soutter 

COMMITTEE 



Progress Report 
on Audit of 
School of 
Education 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

he is officially retired, but recommended that the Trustees award 
to him the honorary title of Dean Emeritus of the Medical School. 
Acting Dean Butcher said he was not certain whether Dr. Soutter 
would prefer the title of Dean Emeritus or Professor Emeritus. 
The Chairman said he believed that Dr. Soutter should have his 
choice, and added that office space should be provided for him at 
the Medical School. The view was expressed that both titles would 
be appropriate. 

After a motion was made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
concur in President Wood's award to Dr. Lamar 
Soutter of the honorary title of Dean Emeritus 
and Professor of Surgery Emeritus, effective 
April 6, 1975, in recognition of his dedicated 
and outstanding leadership as the first Dean of 
the University of Massachusetts Medical School 
at Worcester. 

The final agenda item was an update on the continuing 
audit of the School of Education at Amherst. President Wood told 
the Committee that his second report to the Board on the progress 
of the audit of the School of Education, to be distributed at the 
Board meeting, dealt with findings to date insofar as they can be 
revealed in light of legal restrictions. He said his report 
reveals that Phase I of the internal audit of the School of Educa- 
tion conducted by Treasurer Johnson has been completed, which 
covers the $2.4 million in grant money alleged to have been subject 
to possible misuse. 

The President added that the international accounting 
firm of Coopers & Lybrand had been retained to assist and support 
the Treasurer since it was clear that the internal audit staff 
was much too small to handle the task by itself while fulfilling 
its other responsibilities. 

President Wood continued that the Auditors' report con- 
firmed what Chancellor Bromery had already identified in terms of 
individual behavior, and revealed that procedures used within the 
School of Education had bypassed certain established University 
procedures. He stated that he and Chancellor Bromery had to 
determine how that process of bypassing had occurred and who was 
responsible for it. 

The President said that, although he or the Treasurer 
was authorized to execute a contract with Coopers & Lybrand, he 
felt it was important that the members of the Finance Committee 
be advised concerning this matter. 

Further discussion followed on the subject of confiden- 
tiality of records. Treasurer Johnson also reminded the Committee 



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COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

that the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare was 
auditing HEW grants and the Commonwealth was auditing state grants 
at the School of Education. 

There was no other business to come before the Committee 
at this meeting, and Chairman Healey declared it adjourned at 
12:05 p.m. 



On 



4»Jl^ICj-XC- Qc*--J-~jr 



X 



ladys QKeith Hardy- 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4 543 

Exec. Comm. 
4-2-75 



Progress Report 7 
on Audit of 
School of 
Education 



I 



I 



4 5 44 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Boston — 
Review of 
Status of 
Environmental 
Impact Report 



L 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

April 16, 1975; 11:00 a.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Knowles, President 
Wood; Trustees Clark, Spiller; Secretary Hardy, Treasurer 
Johnson; Miss Eichel, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Mrs. Robinson, Vice President 
for Planning; Mr. Post, Assistant Vice President for 
Physical Planning; Mr. Stephenson, Staff Associate, 
Planning Office 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Melley, Director of 
Public Information; Professor Fletcher, Faculty Repre- 
sentative 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Rawn, Assistant 
Chancellor 

UM/Worcester : Acting Dean Butcher; Dr. Majno, Chairman, 
Department of Pathology; Mr. Grieg, Director of the 
Physical Plant 

Invited Guests : Mr. Michael McKinnell and Mr. Henry Wood, 
Kallmann & McKinnell, Architects; Mr. Harold Roth, Roth 
& Moore, Architects; Mr. George Pumphret , Building 
Authority; Mr. Kelvin Abron, Student Intern, Jeremiah E. 
Burke High School, Boston; Mr. Matthew Davis, Student 
Intern, Copley Square High School, Boston 



The meeting was called to order at 11:05 a.m. by 
Chairman Knowles . 

At the request of the Chairman, Mr. Post, Assistant 
Vice President for Physical Planning, reviewed briefly the status 
of the environmental impact study for Phase II construction at 
UM/Boston. He said that the draft report had been favorably 
received and that the BRA, which had originally had some objections i 
had indicated that the report had satisfied its concerns. The 
final report will be filed with the Executive Office of Environ- 
mental Affairs on or before April 28, will then be published by 
them, and assuming that the report is approved by the appropriate 
agencies, construction can begin by 60 days after publication of 
the report. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Knowles then asked Vice President Robinson to 
report on the status of site selection for the Kennedy Library. 
Mrs. Robinson said that the Kennedy Site Selection Committee is 
still interested in one site at UM/Amherst and one at UM/Boston, 
and that they are consulting with members of the community as well 
as University personnel to make sure that all parties concerned 
are aware of the expected impact such a facility would have on the 
lives of the residents of neighboring communities. It is antici- 
pated that the Kennedy Library Corporation will select a site 
sometime in May. Trustee Spiller suggested that the Trustees may 
wish to indicate a preference for one site in order to strengthen 
the University's position in future negotiations. 

Chancellor Golino said that he would like very much to 
have the Library at UM/Boston, but that he would prefer to see it 
at UM/Amherst than to have it go to another institution. 

Chairman Knowles requested the Planning Office to prepare 
a list of the advantages and disadvantages of both University 
sites from the point of view of both the University and the Kennedy 
Corporation, to be distributed to the Committee on Buildings and 
Grounds prior to the May meeting of the Board of Trustees. 

Chairman Knowles next asked Mr. Post to bring the Commit- 
tee up to date with regard to the progress of site work at UM/ 
Worcester. Mr. Post reported that the Bureau of Building Construc- 
tion has started design work on the road system, lighting and 
landscaping, and has authorized Ritchie Associates to begin work 
on this phase. This work may be curtailed due to lack of sufficient 
funds to complete the entire project. The roadways and patient 
parking will take priority; the landscaping may not be possible 
without additional funds. Trustee Spiller asked whether students 
and faculty from the College of Food and Natural Resources at UM/ 
Amherst might assist in the landscaping. Mr. Grieg offered to 
explore this possibility. 

At the request of Chairman Knowles, Assistant Chancellor 
Rawn reviewed the status of the shuttle bus turnaround at Columbia 
Station, indicating that although the property is now leased from 
the Gulf Oil Company, it should at some time in the future become 
the property of the University. He said that the parking lot needs 
resurfacing, which would cost approximately $60,000 to $70,000. 
He feels that negotiation for the land would require much time and 
that, therefore, it should begin very soon. Mr. Rawn said that 
the University as well as other organizations in the community have 
been working on a proposal to request the MBTA to add a stop at 
Columbia Station for those trains on the Quincy line. He said this 
would not interfere with the bus turnaround. Treasurer Johnson 
asked if the MBTA might take the Gulf land by right of eminent 
domain. No action was taken by the Committee pending exploration 
of the possible acquisition of the land by the MBTA. 



4 545 

B & G Comm. 
4-16-75 

Status of 
Kennedy Library 
Site Selection 



UM/ Wore ester — 
Status of Site 
Work Contract 



UM/Boston — 
Status of Shut- 
tle Bus Site 



4 5 46 

B & G Comm. 
4-16-75 

Request 

Regarding Avail- 
ability of 
University 
Land committee 

for Use in 
Farming 



UM/Boston — 
Building 120 
(Gymnasium) 



UM/Amher 

DPW Requ 

Construe 

Transmit 

Station 

(Doc. T75-118) 



st — 
est to 
t Radio 
ter 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Knowles asked Mr. Post to speak to the item 
regarding the request from the State Department of Agriculture for 
land to use for farming. Mr. Post said the department is listing 
parcels of land which can be made available to private citizens 
or community groups for the growing of food. He said that the 
campuses had responded, indicating that some land was available, 
although limited by soil conditions and water supply. Mr. Post 
said that although he feels the proposal has merit, lack of funding 
will make it difficult for the Department of Agriculture to develop 
an effective program. 

Mr. Rawn next reviewed the present plans and the develop- 
ment schedule for Building 120 (the gymnasium) at UM/Boston. He 
said that since it takes six months to complete working drawings, 
the BBC has directed the architects to begin drawings for Building 
120 in anticipation of favorable action on the final environmental 
impact report. He said the preliminary drawings would be brought 
to the Committee at its May meeting. He stated further that work- 
ing drawings will be submitted to the Committee before they are 
finalized. It is expected that the foundation design will be com- 
pleted on or about August 16, and that work on the foundation will 
begin shortly thereafter, to be completed on or about November 15. 
It is anticipated that construction of the building will begin in 
late January or early February 1976 with completion in January 1977 

Mr. Rawn said that since the Committee had approved the 
schematic design, certain changes had been made, for design and 
financial reasons, in the northwest entrance from ground level, in 
the location of office space, and in the use of the area below the 
automobile exit ramp. In answer to a question, he indicated that 
the locker room areas were designed so that space can be assigned 
to men and women as demand determines. 

Chairman Knowles turned to the request by the Department 
of Public Works to construct a radio transmitter station on Univer- 
sity land on Mount Lincoln, as outlined in Doc. T75-118, and asked 
Secretary Hardy to introduce this agenda item. Mrs. Hardy explained 
that this proposal had originally come to the Secretary's Office 
from UM/Amherst with a request for the delegation of authority to 
the Chancellor to deal with all such requests. That proposal 
arrived too late for adequate review by the President's Office 
and inclusion in the regular agenda. Therefore the specific DPW 
request only was being brought to the Committee at this time 
because the Department needed early action. 

Secretary Hardy then asked Daniel Melley, Director of 
Public Information at UM/Amherst, to give the background of the 
request. Mr. Melley said that there is currently radio trans- 
mitter equipment, as well as a fire tower on Mount Lincoln and that 
the purpose of the proposed station is to enable the DPW to com- 
municate with their cars in the area. The station would be con- 
structed and maintained by the DPW which would also pay electrical 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

costs. An emergency generator would be provided by the DPW which 
could be used as a backup for the University station, and the 
building would provide space for additional repeater equipment. 
Mr. Melley said that the license issued would be similar to that 
approved by the Board for a DPW facility on Mount Toby. After 
brief discussion, on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees authorize 
the Chancellor of the Amherst campus, or those 
designated by him, to prepare the necessary 
instruments to license the Department of Public 
Works of the Commonwealth to enter upon the lands 
of the University at Mount Lincoln in Hampshire 
County, for the purpose of installing, maintaining 
and operating a Radio Transmitter Station to main- 
tain communication with its vehicles: further that 
Treasurer Kenneth W. Johnson shall be empowered 
and authorized to execute all instruments for and 
in behalf of the Trustees of the University in 
furtherance of these matters. 

The meeting was recessed at 12:15 p.m. for lunch and 
reconvened at 12:35 p.m., at which time Chairman Knowles turned 
to the matter of naming an auditorium at the Medical Science 
Building at UM/Worcester . 

Chairman Knowles informed the Committee that former 
Chancellor Soutter had expressed his pleasure to learn that the 
library at the Medical School had been named for him, but had urged 
that Judge J. John Fox's contribution to the Medical School and 
Teaching Hospital also receive recognition. Dr. Butcher, Acting 
Dean of the Medical School, proposed that Amphitheater I in the 
Medical School be named for Judge Fox. Trustee Clark said she 
approved of the suggestion, but observed that it was an exception 
to the Trustee policy of not naming buildings for living persons. 
It was the sense of the Committee that this was an exceptional case, 
as had been the naming of the library for Dr. Soutter, since his 
and Judge Fox's contributions were of such dimensions as to warrant 
an exception to the policy. Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

Amphitheater One at the Medical School at the 
University of Massachusetts at Worcester be 
named the J. John Fox Amphitheater. 

The last item on the agenda was a review of the feasi- 
bility study for the parking garage at UM/Worcester authorized by 
the Building Authority under the provisions of the vote taken by 
the Board of Trustees on November 7, 1973. 

At the request of Chairman Knowles, Mr. George Pumphret, 
speaking as Chairman of the Building Authority, commented on the 



4 547 

B & G Comm. 
4-16-75 

UM/ Amherst — 

DPW Request to 

Construct Radio 

Transmitter 

Station 

(Doc. T75-118) 



UM/Worcester — 
Naming of 
Medical Science 
Auditorium 



UM/Worcester — 
Review of 
Building 
Authority Feasi- 
bility Study on 
Possible Parking 
Garage 



4 548 



B & G Comm. 
4-16-75 

UM/ Wo re ester — 
Review of Build- 
ing Authority 
Feasibility 

n . j COMMITTEE 

Study 

on Possible 

Parking Garage 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Final Draft of the Car Parking Study for the University of Massachu - 
setts/Worcester, Medical School Campus , as prepared by Kallmann & 
McKinnell, Architects, and Edison Parking, Consultants. 

Mr. Pumphret stated that the report was excellent, and 
that his only concern was the matter of financing. He said that the 
Building Authority agrees with University personnel that a garage 
is needed, but he was concerned that 80 percent of the users will 
be faculty, staff, and students, for whom reduced rates are pro- 
posed. His personal arithmetic suggested that the garage would 
have to receive about $1.25 per stall per day. He stated that the 
Building Authority would not be willing to build the garage unless 
it has some assurance that it will not be a deficit operation. Mr. 
Pumphret said that he would advocate building the garage in two 
phases, taking the chance of having too little parking space rather 
than too much. 

President Wood also praised the proposal. He believed 
the University was faced with a choice: charging rates higher than 
University personnel want to pay in order to keep the rate for 
visitors reasonable, or charging less to University users and 
taking the risk that visitors will not use the garage. 

A third alternative would be to blacktop the site and 
eliminate the garage, but at the scale suggested, he feels this 
extremely undesirable in relation to the rest of the complex. 
Although the higher fees would cause problems for the administration 
at the Medical School, he felt it was important to establish a fee 
at the outset. Acting Dean Butcher anticipated little opposition 
to the parking fee from the faculty, but indicated that opposition 
would probably come from the hospital employees. He also said 
that he believed the garage to be important to the appearance of 
the overall setting. 

Mr. Pumphret said that his concern was that the garage 
generate a sufficient amount of revenue to cover the cost of 
construction and operation. He also expressed his view that a pro- 
fessional concern should operate the garage. Dr. Majno said that 
one problem faced by the University was that parking at other 
hospitals in the area is free. 

Trustee Spiller suggested that a revised fee schedule be 
prepared using job class or salary schedule as a basis for charges 
and setting visitor fees in line with parking rates being charged 
elsewhere in the city of Worcester. He further suggested sounding 
out the users to determine viability and acceptability of the rates. 

Treasurer Johnson said it was important for the garage 
to be part of an integral parking system to include the various 
lots for the total campus. He said the independent operation of 
the UM/Amherst Campus Center Garage is partially responsible for 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

its financial troubles. Another decision which should be made, he 
said, is whether to charge different fees for different parking 
locations, as is done at UM/Amherst. 

The consensus of the Committee was to accept Trustee 
Spiller's suggestion that a subcommittee look at the financing 
alternatives in greater detail and that the University begin charg- 
ing at once for parking in the various parking lots, to build up 
a reserve for future debt service payments. 

There being no further business, the meeting adjourned 
at 1 : 25 p.m. 



$ladyj{J Keith Hardy 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4 5 49 

B & G Comm. 
4-16-75 

UM/Worcester — 
Review of Build- 
ing Authority 
Feasibility 
Study On 
Possible 
Parking Garage 



4 5 50 



COMMITTEE 



Report of 
University- 
Austerity 
Program 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON THE BUDGET 

April 16, 1975; 11:00 a.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 



PRESENT: 



Trustees and Trustee Staff: Chairman Carlson; Trustees 



Breyer and Troy; Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Mr. Gartenberg, Budget 
Director; Mrs. Hanson, Assistant Budget Director; 
Mr. Lewis, Staff Assistant 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Dr. Gluckstern, Vice 
Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost; Professor 
Fletcher, Faculty Representative; Mr. Gulko, Budget 
Director 

UM/Boston : Mr. Hamilton, Vice Chancellor for Administra- 
tion and Finance; Mr. Baxter, Director of Budget and 
Control; Professor Gagnon, Faculty Representative 

UM/Worcester : Acting Dean Butcher; Mr. Stockwell, 
Associate Dean for Administrative Affairs and Hospital 
Director 



The meeting was called to order at 11:05 a.m. The 
Chairman observed that no official action could be taken at the 
meeting because a quorum was not present. He suggested that the 
Committee express its general sense on the proposed votes, then 
hold a brief meeting just prior to the May Board meeting to take 
official action. 

The first item on the agenda was a Report on the Univer- 
sity Austerity Program. Chairman Carlson asked Mrs. Hanson to 
provide some background. She informed the Committee that the 
program had begun the previous December at President Wood's behest 

The President had called for a freeze on the filling of 
positions, as well as other cutbacks in nonpersonnel areas. The 
specific programs were developed by each campus to meet its 
specific situation. The report presented to the Committee described 
these efforts. 

Mrs. Hanson said the report had also been sent to Secre- 
tary Parks and Secretary Buckley. Secretary Buckley had met with 
the President, as well, and he had been briefed on the efforts 






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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

contained in the report, and on the problems of salary and fuel 
deficiency. These deficiencies had been reduced from $8.7 to $4.9 
million. 

A status report was presented of the specific steps which 
had been taken to secure the necessary funding. Mrs. Hanson 
indicated that the request for fuel and salary funds had just been 
formally submitted and that it would be at least several weeks 
before a formal response could be provided. 

The Chairman stressed the importance of making these 
efforts and their results public. The other Trustees agreed, and 
Mrs. Hanson stated the belief that the proper vehicle was the only 
outstanding question. Chairman Carlson said this was particularly 
important in these times when the University was sorely in need of 
good will. 

Trustee Breyer asked for a clearer explanation of the 
meaning of the deficiencies, and Mr. Gartenberg replied that the 
University had budgeted for amounts sufficient to pay for fuel cost 
increases and cost-of-living increases, even though the funds for 
these expenses had not been appropriated by the Legislature. He 
described this as standard operating procedure for state agencies, 
and said it was based on the assumption that the Legislature would 
provide funds to heat and illuminate the campuses and to pay for 
the cost-of-living increases which it authorized. 

He continued that the figure of $8.7 million had been for 
the anticipated FY 75 deficiency costs, but that cost-cutting 
efforts had reduced these costs by $3.8 million. Trustee Breyer 
said he thought the average person reading about these deficiencies 
in the newspaper would tend to conclude that the University was 
asking for more money, rather than the reverse. The comment 
prompted a reiteration by several persons present of the importance 
of clear, sufficient publicity of the University's cost-cutting 
successes . 

Chancellor Bromery spoke next about efforts and problems 
on the Amherst campus. He said many of the actions had caused 
hardships, and cited the instances of next year's courses which 
were in the catalogue, and for which students had signed up, but 
which would not be given for lack of faculty. He added that when 
the campus begins bringing in new faculty members at lower salaries 
than their predecessors, it becomes difficult to attract the best 
academic talent. 

Chancellor Bromery pointed out that the fuel deficiency 
was the most pressing problem. He said it was not possible to 
defer payment to oil and coal vendors, and added that though there 
was money in the "08" account, it was encumbered. 



4551 

Budget Comm. 
4-16-75 

Report of 
University 
Austerity 
Program 



4552 

Budget Comm. 
4-16-75 

Report of 
University 
Austerity 
Program 

COMMITTEE 



UM/Amherst — 

Adjustments to 

FY 75 Operating 

Budget 

(Doc. T75-103) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Chairman asked for the results of energy conserva- 
tion, and Mr. Gulko reported that the conservation had resulted in 
a savings of from 11 to 14 percent. 

Professor Fletcher asked whether classes had had to be 
cancelled in the current semester because of the position freeze. 
Vice Chancellor Gluckstern answered in the negative, saying the 
criterion presently being used to decide whether or not to fill 
vacant positions was whether doing so would prevent class cancel- 
lations. He added that the fall semester might be a different 
story. 

Dr. Gluckstern also cited what he called a critical 
fact: The University was being asked to reduce requests in the 
FY 76 budget, but these reductions would be made in the already- 
austere level of expenditure presently in effect. 

Chancellor Bromery informed the Committee that certain 
offices on the campus, such as admissions, were closed to students 
two days a week to catch up with their workload. 

Vice Chancellor Hamilton reported that the Boston campus 
plans were outlined in a general way in the document prepared and 
distributed by the University budget office. He added that the 
campus was looking elsewhere for savings as well, and emphasized 
that his rule of thumb was to look for savings in operations which 
might yield savings of from 25 to 50 percent . Telephone service 
was being studied in this respect. Mr. Hamilton reiterated that 
the Boston campus had determined to deal first with the changes 
which had the potential for yielding the greatest saving. 

Speaking for the Worcester campus, Acting Dean Butcher 
reported that there had been unexpected overruns on the fuel 
account, and said that in this context there was even greater need 
for payments from the Bureau of Building Construction. For this 
reason, he said, transfers would be necessary from the "01" account. 
Currently, 205 positions were being held vacant, due partly to 
slippage in the teaching hospital opening date and partly to 
austerity. 

Dean Butcher informed the Committee that the Worcester 
campus was putting into effect the same kinds of austerity moves 
reported by the Boston campus, but he made the observation that 
the total saving achieved by such measures as telephone cutbacks 
is not great. 

Chairman Carlson commended the campuses for their 
success in cutting down on expenses. 

The next item on the agenda was the matter of proposed 
Adjustments to FY 75 Operating Budget (Doc. T75-103) at UM/Amherst 
There was a brief discussion, during which Mrs. Hanson remarked 



COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

that each of the campuses will probably need yet another set of 
transfers, such as those currently proposed, once the University 
finds out what amount it will receive for the fuel deficiency. The 
Committee expressed the sense that it would vote to approve the 
proposed transfers at a special meeting to be held just prior to the 
May Board of Trustees meeting. 

The Chairman turned next to a Trust Fund Interest Request 
for Fund Allocation from Reserves (Doc. T75-104) . Mrs. Hanson 
summarized the contents of the document, which set forth the reasons 
for the request, and the uses to which the funds to be transferred 
would be put. The Committee again expressed its sense that it would 
vote to recommend this transfer at the meeting to be held before 
the May Board meeting. 

The final item on the formal agenda was a Discussion of 
Budget Options for Fiscal Year 1976. Chairman Carlson stated his 
view that the options for long-term cutbacks were unpleasant, but 
necessary. He observed that such immediate measures as position 
freezes would not solve long-term needs. The fiscal crisis facing 
the state would continue for several years, he said, and he felt 
the document describing possible options was a good beginning. 
Chairman Carlson also stated the hope that the Trustees would have 
the opportunity to make a positive contribution to development of 
long-range budget solutions. 

Mr. Gartenberg remarked that there were three formulae 
directed toward the University's FY 1976 budget — that of the Office 
of Administration and Finance, that of the Office of Educational 
Affairs, and that of the Joint Committee on Ways and Means of the 
Legislature. He said that each of these formulae contemplated a 
budget approximately equal to the FY 1975 operating budget. 

One bright spot, said Mr. Gartenberg, was that a resolution 

could be expected sooner than had been anticipated; the Secretary 

of Administration and Finance had called for budget submission by 
the end of April. 

Mr. Gulko said his office had analyzed the Executive 
Office of Educational Affairs' formula. The proposed reductions, 
allowing for defrayment of fuel costs, would leave an Amherst 
budget of $60 million, which would mean that as many as a thousand 
students could not be paid for campus work, which is essential to 
many students. He said it could necessitate reducing Amherst 
personnel by two to three hundred persons at all levels. 

In a severe austerity program, said Mr. Gulko, the campus 
believed it must exercise much more management control than in the 
past. He added that resorting to the administrative options sug- 
gested in the document which had been circulated to the Committee 
would lead to serious inefficiencies. 



4553 

Budget Comm. 
4-16-75 

UM/Amherst — 

Adjustments to 

FY 75 Operating 

Budget 

(Doc; ;T7 5-103) 



Trust Fund 
Interest Request 
for Fund 
Allocation from 
Reserves 
(Doc. T75-104) 



Budget Options 
for FY 1976 



4 554 

Budget Comm. 
4-16-75 

Budget Options 
for FY 1976 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Chairman agreed that administrative options would 
yield little savings in the long run, and said program options 
would have to bear much of the burden. He conceded that reductions 
in such areas were not easy to make and would entail some sacri- 
fices. He cited requests for funds for several nontraditional pro- 
grams and observed that, although these were desirable programs, 
they must have lower priority than existing academic programs 
serving the students on campus. 

Mr. Gartenberg said it would be difficult to make 
relative choices about academic programs before the budget picture 
cleared . 

Dr. Gluckstern informed the Committee that a task force 
had been formed on the Amherst campus to develop criteria for 
choices about the relative priority of different programs. Both 
Mr. Gartenberg and Chairman Carlson asked for the submission of 
these criteria to the Committee when they reach draft form so that 
the Trustees would have some perspective by which to assess the 
campuses 



I 



recommendations. 



There was no further business to come before the 
Committee, and the meeting was therefore adjourned at 12:30 p.m. 



' 



$ladyjQ Keith Hardy * 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



* 



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MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON LONG-RANGE PLANNING 



April 16, 1975; 1:30 p.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Rowland, President 
Wood; Trustees Carlson, Clark, Robertson, Spiller, Steed; 
Mr. Callahan, representing Trustee Anrig; Secretary 
Hardy; Miss Eichel, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice Presi- 
dent for Academic Affairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President 
for Planning; Mr. Cooley, Assistant Vice President for 
Analytical Studies; Mr. Gartenberg, Budget Director 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery, Mr. Gluckstern, Vice 
Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Gulko, 
Budget Director; Professor Fletcher, Faculty Representa- 
tive 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Babcock, Executive 
Assistant Chancellor 



The meeting was called to order at 1:45 p.m. by Chairman 
Rowland, who informed the Committee that although no meeting had 
been originally scheduled in May, the Committee would now meet at 
a date to be determined. 

At the request of the Chairman, Vice President Robinson 
called attention to the draft of a planning notebook which is 
being prepared in the Planning Office for the use of members of the 
Committee on Long-Range Planning. The notebook is divided into 
four sections, one for each campus and one covering University-wide 
matters. 

Chairman Rowland asked that the Committee address first 
the report by Chancellor Golino in which he states his actions and 
comments on the New Directions Committee Report. The Chairman 
remarked that the Committee's discussion of the long-range plans 
for the Boston campus had begun in the fall of 1973 and she asked 
President Wood to review the history of the Harbor Campus. He said 
that there had been two streams of thought as to how it should be 
developed: the first, that it should be traditional in nature; and 
the second, that it should concentrate on urban programs and urban 



4555 



Planning 
Notebook 



UM/Boston — 
Comments by 
Chancellor on 
New Directions 
Committee Report 



4556 

Long-Range Plan. 
Comm. 4-16-74 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



UM/Boston — 
Comments by- 
Chancellor on 
New Directions 

COMMITTEE 

Committee 
Report 



UM/Amherst — 

Enrollment 

Planning 



problems, which would mean, in addition to more nontraditional 
programs, a different type of faculty and student body. In his 
attempts to reconcile these two concepts, Chancellor Golino estab- 
lished a New Directions Committee to consider what future goals 
the campus should pursue and to report their recommendations. 
President Wood stated that in June 1974, the Board of Trustees had 
set forth policy guidelines with regard to enrollment planning at 
UM/Boston (Doc. T74-105) to aid the campus in their planning 
efforts and that the New Directions Report had since been published 
and discussed in the University Assembly. The Chancellor's report, 
which has been distributed to the Committee on Long-Range Planning, 
reflects the actions of the Assembly as well as the actions and 
comments of the Chancellor. President Wood indicated that the 
Executive Committee would need to consider portions of the report, 
some of the recommendations will be considered by other Committees 
of the Board, and others do not require any action by the Board, 
but have been submitted for information only to the Trustees. He 
stated that at this time the most important part of the report is 
the overall direction proposed for the campus. The report includes 
recommendations with respect to summer and extended-day programs, 
as well as pre-college programs. 

Chairman Rowland said that since the full report of the 
Chancellor had been circulated to Trustees too late to allow them 
to give it thorough consideration at this time, she would not ask 
for any action at this time, but asked that the sense of the meet- 
ing be recorded as follows: that the New Directions Committee, the 
Assembly and the Chancellor of the University at Boston should be 
commended for their constructive efforts in considering a variety 
of key policy issues for the future of the University at Boston. 

Chancellor Golino said that he, too, would prefer to 
defer discussion of his report until such time as the Trustees had 
had an opportunity to weigh his recommendations and could spend 
more time in a discussion of the various aspects of the report. 

It was agreed that because of the importance and com- 
plexity of the subject, the report from Chancellor Golino would be 
heard at a subsequent meeting of the Committee. 

A number of Trustees pointed to the desirability for 
this Committee to meet occasionally by itself in order to have 
free-ranging discussions about the future directions of the 
campuses . 

Chairman Rowland then turned to the second agenda item, 
Enrollment Planning for the Amherst campus, and asked President 
Wood to introduce this item. The President complimented the campus 
on the document and said that the materials contained therein will 
be of great assistance to him in discussions with the Legislature 
regarding the budget. He indicated that his first priority for 



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Committee discussion would be the size and direction of the graduate 
programs and the related cost. Other issues needing discussion, he 
indicated, were on-campus vs. off-campus programs, the ratio of 
full-time to part-time students and the use of full-time equivalent 
(FTE) and headcount in considering enrollment goals. He stated 
that the assessment of the physical capacity of the campus also 
raises questions which must be resolved. 

At the request of the Chairman, President Wood spoke 
briefly about the current budget situation and the need to separate 
budget problems from long-range planning. He said it should be 
assumed that budgets will be tight over the next five years and 
that enrollments may change because of a difference in both the 
type of student seeking higher education and in the type of educa- 
tion being sought. He said that the more the Committee has pro- 
gressed in its planning for the future, the easier it will be for 
administrative officers to make informed budget decisions in the 
current fluid and uncertain times. He said that he is planning to 
give a press conference soon dealing with the matters of austerity 
and executive compensation. 

Chancellor Bromery said that although time constraints 
for producing the information for the Committee had not permitted 
a review by all of the campus governing bodies, an attempt had been 
made to reflect points of view in addition to those of administra- 
tion. 

The report attempted to address each of the four general 
topics which the Committee had specified at their last meeting. 
In addition, the report made five major recommendations to the 
Committee: 

— That the 25,000 student enrollment limit, as adopted 
for the Amherst campus by the Trustees in 1972, be 
defined as full-time equivalent students engaged in 
learning activities on campus. 

— That a target proportion of upper division full-time 
equivalent undergraduate students (juniors and seniors) 
relative to lower division full-time equivalent under- 
graduate students be established at a ratio not to 
exceed 60:40. 

— That a target proportion of graduate full-time equiv- 
alent enrollment relative to undergraduate full-time 
enrollment be established at a ratio not to exceed 20:80. 

— That physical adjustments to accommodate program 
changes resulting from these recommendations be effected 
through renovations and modifications of existing 
facilities . 



4 557 

Long-Range Plan 
Comm. 4-16-75 

UM/Amherst — 

Enrollment 

Planning 



4 558 



Long-Range Plan, 
Comm. 4-16-75 

UM/Amherst — 

Enrollment 

Planning 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



— That these policies be reviewed at least once every 
three years by the appropriate governance units on the 
Amherst campus. 

Trustee Carlson asked if the graduate student percentage 
was being increased because of demand in the market or for the 
purpose of achieving the 25,000 FTE ceiling. Mr. Gulko replied 
that at the present time both graduate and undergraduate applica- 
tions are high and that the suggested 20:80 mix in graduate/under- 
graduate students is appropriate to the University regardless of 
the total enrollment. He said, also, that an increase in enroll- 
ment is expected at the master's level in professional studies. 
Queried as to whether off-campus programs were included in the 
graduate figures, Mr. Gulko replied that they were not, since off- 
campus programs were primarily a function of resources. 

President Wood raised the question as to whether increases 
were anticipated in graduate programs other than professional 
studies, or whether programs in the arts and sciences were pre- 
sently at optimum size. Vice President Lynton asked if trends in 
the various areas could be extrapolated. Vice Chancellor Gluck- 
stern said that demand is down in the humanities, which are some- 
what independent of the job market. Demand is high at both the 
master's and the doctor's level in the social and natural sciences, 
In the arts and sciences the graduate enrollment is expected to 
level off. Professional training is expected to increase, 
especially in the fields of business, engineering and agriculture. 

In response to a question from Trustee Carlson as to why 
the percentage of graduate students should increase to 20 percent 
of the total student enrollment, Mr. Gluckstern replied that the 
Amherst campus is not as far along in the development of graduate 
programs as are many other public universities and that this is a 
reasonable figure. Trustee Carlson asked if increasing the pro- 
portion of graduate students would not have the effect of 
relegating undergraduate education to the state and community 
colleges. 

Discussion ensued with regard to how best to assure 
quality undergraduate education to students in the state, whether 
this should be the function of the University or other institutions, 
and whether the character of graduate education should change. 
Professor Fletcher said that in discussions on the campus at 
Amherst, this question had received much attention and it had been 
the conclusion of the faculty that the University should offer the 
type of education which it was best qualified to provide and that 
which it was uniquely qualified to perform. It had been the con- 
clusion that graduate education fit these criteria. Chancellor 
Bromery indicated that it had been the goal of the campus to pro- 
vide graduate education for those students who otherwise would be 
financially unable to obtain it. Trustee Robertson inquired 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

whether state subsidies to students to enable them to attend other 
institutions might be a less costly way of accomplishing this goal. 
Mr. Gluckstern commented that studies have shown that the strength 
of graduate programs have a correlation to the quality of under- 
graduate education. 

President Wood said that he was concerned that the public 
would perceive a 28,000 headcount with 20 percent graduate students 
as enrollment growth, rather than a different means of reaching the 
25,000 FTE ceiling. He said that he is also concerned with the 
factors of job placement for students and limited public resources. 
Mr. Lynton said that he felt the projections should be recast to 
indicate the desire for a first professional degree. Trustee Clark 
asked if the students enrolled in the graduate program were the 
same students who were originally in the undergraduate programs. 
Mr. Gluckstern replied that in the professional schools, many of 
those enrolled in graduate programs have been working and have now 
come back for an additional degree. In the arts and sciences the 
students tend to continue directly from the undergraduate to the 
graduate program. Trustee Robertson questioned whether programs 
should be provided simply because of student demand even though 
there may not be a market for those graduates in the business world. 
Mr. Lynton said that for a variety of reasons there will be a con- 
tinuing call for advanced degrees as job qualifications. Mr. Gulko 
said that many people use the graduate degree as a means of changing 
careers . 

General discussion was concluded and at 3:20 p.m., on 
motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To go into executive session. 

At the conclusion of the executive session, the meeting 
adjourned at 4:15 p.m. 



4iadys»Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4 559 

Long-Range Plan. 
Comm. 4-16-75 

UM/Amherst — 

Enrollment 

Planning 

i : : i'<;"i:.-:00 



4 5 60 



COMMITTEE 



University 
Tuition Waiver 
Policies 
(Doc. T75-075B) 

Foreign Student 
Tuition Waivers 
(Doc. T75-117) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT AFFAIRS 

April 22, 1975; 2:00 p.m. 

Room 174, Campus Center 
University of Massachusetts/Amherst 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Shaler; Trustees 
Abrams and Savini; Mrs. Hold en, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Mr. Keith, Associate Vice 
President for University Policy; Mr. Bench, Assistant 
Counsel; Mr. Cahill, Staff Assistant 

UM/Amherst : Dr. Gage, Vice Chancellor for Student 
Affairs; Professor Fletcher, Faculty Representative 

UM/Boston : Ms. Furman, Assistant to the Vice Chan- 
cellor for Student Affairs 

Students : Ms. Ellen Carraciolo, Ms. Chrissi Emerson, 
Mr. Michael Federow, Ms. Ellen Gavin, Mr. Mark Hopkins, 
Ms. Karen Mangan, Ms. Vanessa Nii, Mr. Douglas Phelps, 
Mr. Miguel Rivera, Ms. Susan Rives t 

Others : Mr. Peter d'Errico, member, Socialist Faculty 
Caucus; Mr. Larry Magid, Student Center for Educational 
Research 



The meeting was called to order at 2:00 p.m. The Chair- 
man turned first to the University Tuition Waiver Policies (Doc. 
T75-075B) . An amendment had been proposed on the subject of 
Foreign Student Tuition Waivers (Doc. T75-117) . After a brief 
discussion, a motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Committee on Finance that the 
University's Tuition Waiver Policies as set 
forth in Trustee Document T75-075B be amended by 
inserting a new section 3.2 to read, in its 
entirety, as follows: 

3.2 Foreign Students 

A tuition waiver for foreign students is an 
appropriate method of encouraging and enabling 
foreign students from geographic areas 
currently underrepresented at the University 
in order to encourage cross-cultural academic inter- 
change at the University. These tuition 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

waivers are to be awarded on the basis of 
financial need and are authorized up to a 
maximum of ten percent of the total number 
of foreign students attending the granting 
campus, to be allotted either to foreign 
graduate or undergraduate students in direct 
proportion to their representation on the 
granting campus; provided, however, if the 
total number of foreign students enrolled 
on the granting campus is 200 or less, the 
maximum number of tuition waivers shall be 
twenty. 

Turning next to the agenda item on Student Unionization, 
UM/Amherst, Chairman Shaler indicated that this was a difficult 
subject for him to approach. He stated that the Board together 
with the campuses had developed the Governance Document (T73-098) 
which does not provide for presentations such as this one to the 
Committee on Student Affairs. However, Trustee Savini had requested 
the hearing — a prerogative of his status as a Trustee — and would 
make the presentation to the Committee. 

Trustee Savini stated that this meeting was intended to 
be only informational, with the thought that, at the Board meeting 
on May 7, the Trustees might vote to study the situation over the 
summer and reach a final decision at a later time. However, he 
had been informed that this is an incorrect procedure and has 
indicated in his letter to Dr. Wood his willingness to go forward 
through the Governance procedure. He felt it would be appropriate 
at this time to present informational material on the enabling 
policy. He deferred to Douglas Phelps for background orientation 
and to Susan Rivest for the enabling policy — how it affects students 
and why it would be advantageous to the University. 

In summary, Mr. Phelps stated that the proposal would 
grant students essentially the same rights with respect to their 
relationship to the University as presently exist with the employ- 
ment relationship of the faculty, staff, and classified employees, 
except they would be in the areas of costs, degree requirements, 
and conditions and terms of the learning and living relationships 
between the students and the University. It differs in that it 
would be adopted at the Trustee level rather than at the state 
level. The students at UM/Amherst decided to propose this policy 
which would allow the Trustees to give preliminary recognition to 
the students and to provide a procedure for carrying out the process 
He concluded by citing four developments that seem to be important 
to the concept of student collective bargaining; (1) in the legal 
framework itself — students have the power to enter into contracts 
and to designate agents for the purposes of collective bargaining; 
(2) in the area of faculty collective bargaining — there are now 
over 400 universities with contracts; (3) centralization of 



4561 

Stu. Affairs 
4-22-75 

University 
Tuition Waiver 
Policies 
(Doc. T75-075B) 

Foreign Students 
Tuition Waivers 
(Doc. T75-117) 



UM/Amherst — 

Student 

Unionization 



4562 

Stu. Affairs 
4-22-75 

UM/Amherst — 

Student 

Unionization 

COMMITTEE 



k 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



authority within the university — the development of statewide 
systems with decision-making more centralized making it difficult 
for students to participate; (4) the tightening economic situation- 
in terms of problems in funding postsecondary education. He said 
that collective bargaining seems to be the most direct way to have 
input into the system. 

Ms. Rives t continued, saying that the policy is basically 
an attempt to avoid an adversarial role with the administration 
and the Trustees. She explained that the enabling policy provides 
a means whereby students would have the right to organize them- 
selves into a collective bargaining unit with representatives 
authorized to bargain with the administration. She stated that the 
policy basically gives students the right to have an exclusive 
representative, leaving the finer points to be worked out. 

After 30 percent of the students had signed a petition 
requesting an election for a union, it would be held and a majority 
of the students would have to vote favorably. She explained that 
the SGA cannot become the representative because a majority of the 
students do not participate in its decision-making process. She 
pointed out that the negotiating agreement would run for two years 
and then would come back for renewal, but that by going through 
the Trustees rather than the Legislature, the Board would have the 
right to terminate the agreement at any time. 

Chairman Shaler expressed his concern about the legal 
responsibility and read Mr. Sear son's opinion, conveyed at the 
request of the Committee, that under the provision of the Governance 
Statement, no substantive action could be taken on the proposal. 
Mr. Searson had opined that some areas dealt with by the proposed 
policy are the primary responsibility of the faculty and the policy 
would "radically alter the Governance Statement itself." Chairman 
Shaler expressed personal interest in the document. He added that 
there would be further involvement with them on the part of the 
administration and the Trustees, but that the legal technicalities 
required him to close the subject at that time. 

Trustee Savini described the session as an educational 
experience and believed that the governance process may be used 
over the summer to move the policy forward if the Student Govern- 
ment Association (SGA) decides that is the correct procedure. He 
said the students have not been able to use the governance pro- 
cedure effectively and that their items have not gone forward to 
the Trustees because of continual requests for reconsideration 
which have caused "misunderstanding, discontent, and distraught 
feelings." However, at the request of President Wood, they are 
considering the governance process as a route. 

Chairman Shaler then turned to the group from whom he 
had received a recent request to appear before the Committee. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

He gave permission for them to tape the discussion from this point 
in the meeting. Having identified themselves as the Negotiating 
Team of the Student Action Committee, their spokeswoman, Ms. Mangan, 
read the list of nine demands of the Legislature and the Trustees 
and administration. Chairman Shaler noted that discussion of the 
first three demands would not be required as all present were 
supportive of them. 

Turning to the remaining demands, Chairman Shaler 
inquired whether they had been explored in all possible ways at 
the campus level. Ms. Mangan replied that the results of the Town 
Meeting held at the University last Thursday show that the 
governance procedure is now working in the area of student input. 
She called for immediate dialogue with the Committee. 

Chairman Shaler initiated discussion on the criticism of 
the governance document, asking whether the problem referred to 
resulted from the total document or only some specif ic part (s) . 
Ms. Mangan replied that there is clearly a crisis situation and 
that, with the budget coming out next month, the 70-day provision 
does not give students the opportunity for input on the Trustee 
agenda which the bargaining table would. Ms. Mangan continued that 
the students have the resources but have not been able to get them 
through the established channels to the Board and now have these 
nine demands, supported by about 5,000 students. 

Chairman Shaler interjected that only items having to do 
with student affairs should be discussed at this meeting. He 
pointed out the reference to University day care in demand six, 
stating that the Committee had discussed those particular problems 
extensively during the past year and has been trying to improve 
the program. 

On invitation from Chairman Shaler, Mr. Keith conveyed 
President Wood's opinion that, although he is pleased that students 
are interested in the various budget issues, he would prefer that 
they work through the Student Senate and possibly develop their own 
budget committee to review revenues and expenditures of the campus; 
also, to work with the campus administration rather than trying to 
circumvent it by going directly to the Trustees. 

Regarding the fifth demand for a complete statistical 
report on affirmative action, Ms. Gavin protested that she had 
experienced considerable difficulty in securing data and, in many 
instances, had been told they were not available. Vice Chancellor 
Gage suggested that she contact Mr. Fred Preston. Chairman Shaler 
agreed that, since the Trustees had already approved an Affirmative 
Action plan, the Committee could endorse the fifth demand. 

Students directed the Committee's attention to demand 
nine regarding access to necessary information and records for a 



4563 

Stu. Affairs 

4-22-75 

UM/Amherst — 

Student 

Unionization 



4 5 64 

Stu. Affairs 
4-22-75 

UM/Amherst — 

Student 

Unionization 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

proposed cost/benefit analysis of the Campus Center fee by the 
Student Center for Educational Research. Mr. Keith asked whether 
the SCER has access to the information through the Student Governing 
Board. Ms. Gavin replied that it is only an advisory board and 
has been overruled by the Campus Center management numerous times; 
also, that those students who have tried to get information con- 
cerning financial matters have been consistently denied it. 
Testimony substantiating this statement was volunteered. Trustee 
Abrams questioned whether it would be helpful to ask the Director 
of the Campus Center to attend the next Committee meeting to dis- 
cuss these matters. Chairman Shaler said he would like to report 
the issue to the full Board and seek an explanation, but he could 
not endorse the overall demands. On motion by Trustee Abrams, it 
was 

VOTED : That an explanation be given the Committee, through 
the Chancellor, of the Campus Center's policy of 
withholding information, the nature of the infor- 
mation, and its accessibility, and that the 
Committee make its findings known. 

Mr. Rivera then asked the Chairman that the students be 
informed of any results of their presentation at the meeting and 
said the team will now address itself to "higher levels" but 
expects to return to the Committee to continue discussion. He 
emphasized that they are seriously committed to their purpose and 
will pursue it in responsible ways. Mr. Keith congratulated the 
team on the responsible way it had presented its case to the 
Committee, thus evidencing their sincere interest in the future of 
the University. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:30 p.m. 



^ladysVjKeith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

April 22, 1975; 10:00 a.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Troy, President 

Wood; Trustee Breyer, Mr. Callahan, representing Trustee 
Anrig; Ms. Flannery, representing Trustee Bicknell; 
Secretary Hardy; Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice Presi- 
dent for Academic Affairs 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Gluckstern, Vice 
Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Bischoff, 
Associate Provost; Professor Haim Gunner; Professor 
Seymour Shapiro 

UM/Boston : Mr. Spaethling, Vice Chancellor for Academic 
Affairs and Provost; Professor Gagnon, Faculty Repre- 
sentative 

UM/Worcester : Acting Dean Butcher; Dr. Smith, Associate 
Dean for Academic Affairs and Provost 

UM/Boston Faculty Delegation : Professors James Broderick, 
Joan Liem, Richard Lyons, James Ryan, Reno Schiavo-Campo, 
and Nevin Weaver 



4565 



The meeting was called to order at 10:10 a.m, 
made and seconded, it was 



Upon motion 



I 



VOTED : To enter executive session for the purpose of 
discussing specific tenure recommendations. 

The executive session ended at 11:10 a.m., and the 
Chairman immediately recognized the President. President Wood 
addressed the matter of Tenure Appointments at UM/Amherst (Doc. T75- 
107), UM/Boston (Doc. T75-108) , and UM/Worcester (Doc. T75-088) . 
The President said he had summarized, in his memorandum to the 
Committee dated April 18, the basic criteria involved in appoint- 
ments to tenure. The differences between the campuses, he said, 
had led to different patterns in the awards. He related that, at 



Tenure Appoint- 
ments 

(Docs. T75-107, 
T75-108 and 
T75-088) 



4566 



F & EP Comm. 
4-22-75 

Tenure Appoint- 
ments 

(Docs. T75-107, 
108 and 088) 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Amherst, the Chancellor to date had recommended favorably on only 
49 of the 67 positive recommendations emanating from the depart- 
ments. The President had decided to appoint to tenure 46 of these, 
deferring one without prejudice until the tenure decision year and 
holding two for further information. 

President Wood mentioned that additional information 
received from the campus regarding institutional need enabled him 
to make several positive decisions. He commended both Chancellor 
Bromery and Vice Chancellor Gluckstern on the thoroughness of 
their reviews. 

Turning to the Boston campus, the President reported that 
Chancellor Golino had recommended all of the 23 positive recommen- 
dations emanating from the departments. The President was able, 
at this time, to appoint 16. Four had been remanded to the campus, 
one was deferred without prejudice until the tenure decision year, 
and more information had been requested in the case of two. He 
observed that institutional need had been a factor in only one of 
the candidates who were not appointed. In his decisions, said 
the President, he had been concerned about the strength of the 
campus's recommendations and the absence in some cases of evident 
satisfaction of traditional criteria. 

President Wood said he had been concerned in reviewing 
the Boston recommendations about the lack of consideration of 
candidates in the context of the academic marketplace. He cited 
for the record in this connection an article in the Boston Globe 
of April 22, 1975, by Joel Larus about the bleak future of Social 
Science Ph.D. candidates. He also stated his serious concern 
that the opportunities of younger faculty members whose tenure 
decision years lie in the future not be sacrificed. 

A table in the April 21, 1975, issue of the Chronicle of 
Higher Education had revealed, said the President, that while 57 
percent of faculty at Massachusetts state institutions were 
tenured, the national average was 46 percent. This indicated the 
dilemma of reliance on quotas and percentages, and it suggested 
that increasing judgments would have to be made. Following these 
remarks, the President complimented Vice Chancellor Spaethling on 
his painstaking review and reiterated his compliments to his 
colleagues on the Amherst campus. 

A motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur 
in the President's appointments to tenure at 
the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, as 
contained in Doc. T75-107. 



and it was 



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COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur in 
the President's appointments to tenure at the 
University of Massachusetts at Boston, as contained 
in Doc. T75-108. 

There was no discussion of the Worcester appointments 
since they had been fully discussed at the March meeting of the 
Committee. Accordingly it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur in 
the President's appointments to tenure at the 
University of Massachusetts at Worcester, as contained 
in Doc. T75-088. 

Next was the matter of the Naming of the Gilbert Woodside 
Professorship of Zoology at UM/Amherst (Doc. T75-120) . The Chair- 
man recognized Professor Seymour Shapiro of the Amherst campus. 
Professor Shapiro cited the custom of creating named professorships, 
and said the zoology faculty had been asked for their recommendation 
for a named chair. They had strongly recommended the name of 
Gilbert L. Woodside, a retired professor, whose services to the 
University had been great. There was further brief discussion, 
and it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees establish 
the Gilbert L. Woodside Professorship of Zoology 
at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst as 
described in Doc. T75-120. 

The next item on the agenda was the matter of five New 
Appointments with Tenure at UM/Amherst (Docs. T75-109, T75-119, 
T75-116, T75-110, T75-106) . Vice President Lynton began the dis- 
cussion, stating that in view of the economic conditions and the 
tenure percentages alluded to earlier in the meeting by the Presi- 
dent, new appointments should generally be made at the unt enured 
level, with as low a salary as possible. At the same time, said 
Mr. Lynton, this should limit but not eliminate the possibility of 
making a few strategic appointments which might significantly 
strengthen or change the direction of a department . 

All of the appointments in the Amherst group, he said, 
were within the framework of contingency measures being taken in 
order to meet certain budgetary circumstances for the coming year. 
He added that the appointments represent an appropriate strategy 
of mixing a few carefully chosen senior appointments with junior 
appointments. 

Chairman Troy recognized Vice Chancellor Gluckstern, who 
said he wished to add some general remarks about the need for 
these appointments at a time of austerity in the University. He 
said the campus was aware of the fiscal difficulties facing the 



4567 



F & EP Comm. 
4-22-75 

Tenure Appoint- J 

ments 

(Docs. T75-107, 

108 and 088) 



UM/Amherst — 

Naming of 

Gilbert Woodside 

Professorship of 

Zoology 

(Doc. T75-120) 



UM/Amherst — 
New Appointments 
with Tenure 
(Docs. T75-109, 
119, 116, 110, 
and 106) 



4 5 68 

F & EP Comm. 
4-22-75 

New Appointments 
with Tenure 
(Docs. T75-109, 
119, 116, 110 & 

1Q6) COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

University and said it had been the policy to wait for the fiscal 
picture to clear somewhat, but pointed out that faculty recruit- 
ment decisions must be carried out considerably in advance of 
resource availability, therefore making some risks necessary. 

The process followed with regard to the proposed appoint- 
ments was to analyze the possible budget levels for FY76, said 
Mr. Gluckstern, and then, with the knowledge of the needs of the 
departments, schools, and colleges, set targets for a series of 
salary budget reductions. These figures had been given to each of 
the deans as the amounts by which their budget levels would have 
to be reduced in FY76, along with the question of what effect this 
would have on their programs. 

He added that it had been felt, under the circumstances, 
that the number of offers which would be made and the additional 
amount of money that would be committed in this way was sufficiently 
small that the impact on qualitative development and morale of the 
campus would justify the effort to make a few outstanding appoint- 
ments. There had been enthusiastic support among the faculty for 
making these appointments, which will bring distinction to the 
Departments and the University. 

Mr. Gluckstern also pointed out that two of the appointees 
were of such scholarly distinction that they would bring consider- 
able grant support to the University. 

After further discussion of the distinction and prospec- 
tive contributions of the specific individuals, a motion was made 
and seconded, and it was 



VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur 
with the President's appointment with tenure of 
Dr. Andy B. Anderson as Associate Professor of 
Sociology at the University of Massachusetts at 
Amherst, as set forth in Doc. T75-109. 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur 
with the President's appointment with tenure 
of Dr. Vincent Dethier as Gilbert L. Woodside 
Professor of Zoology at the University of 
Massachusetts at Amherst, as set forth in 
Doc. T75-119. 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur 
with the President's appointment with tenure of 
Dr. Paul R. Halmos as George Birkhoff Professor 
of Mathematics at the University of Massachu- 
setts at Amherst, as set forth in Doc. T75-116. 



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VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur 
with the President's appointment with tenure of 
Dr. Donald W. Katzner as Professor of Economics 
at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, 
as set forth in Doc. T75-110. 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur 
with the President's appointment with tenure of 
Dr. John R. VanRyzin as Professor of Mathematics 
and Statistics at the University of Massachu- 
setts at Amherst, as set forth in Doc. T75-106. 

The Chairman turned to a proposed New Appointment with 
Tenure at UM/Boston (Doc. T75-111) . Vice Chancellor Spaethling 
said the appointment would be the culmination of a two-year search 
for the right person to fill an important role in the field of 
anthropology. Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur 
in the President's appointment with tenure of 
Dr. Frederick C. Gamst as Professor of Anthro- 
pology at the University of Massachusetts at 
Boston, as set forth in Doc. T75-111. 

Chairman Troy then moved to item ten on the agenda, 
Communication from the Faculties of UM/Boston . The Chairman 
recognized the delegation, members of which spoke in turn about 
concerns which had led to a resolution passed by the faculties on 
the subject of personnel decisions. Professor Reno Schiavo-Campo 
introduced the delegation and gave an overview. Citing the 
resolution and President Wood's letter in response to it, Professor 
Richard Lyons described the faculty's concern that the principle 
of rare and carefully explained reversals of faculty personnel 
decisions by administration was eroding. He said the faculty 
believed that it exercised principal, as well as primary, responsi- 
bility in this area and that the essential faculty personnel 
decisions should be made by the faculty. He expressed agreement 
with the necessity of more stringent review, but feared the burden 
for decisons would fall increasingly on the administration. 

Professor James Broderick said it was the feeling among 
the faculty that the levels of administrative review had been 
collapsed. He said the criterion of institutional need in personnel 
decisions should not be invoked on the basis of the campus five-year 
plans without a statement of general guidelines. 

Professor Reno Schiavo-Campo said that even if one were 
to agree with the validity of the institutional need criterion, 
there was a serious question about whether the campus's long-range 
plans could be used to apply it before they are approved by the 
Trustees. He observed that the departments, colleges, and campus 



4 5 69 



F & EP Comm. 
4-22-75 

New Appointments ? 
with Tenure 
(Docs. T75-109, 
119, 116, 110 & 
106) 



UM/Boston — 
New Appointment 
with Tenure 
(Doc. T75-111) 



UM/Boston — 
Communicat ion 
from Faculties 



4 5 70 

F & EP Comm. 
4-22-75 

UM/Boston — 
Communication 
from Faculties 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

as a whole were uncertain if the long-range plans should be put 
into effect since they had had no official response from the Presi- 
dent or Trustees on the plans. If nothing is heard on the plans 
submitted, he asked, should the campus take them as accepted? 

Professor Joan Liem reported faculty concern that the 
institutional need criterion constituted a tenure quota system; 
she added that they hoped it did not. She also reported a concern 
about the use of a tenure quota system outside the departmental 
level . 

Mr. Spaethling said he felt this delegation not to be 
hostile, but merely to be expressing a concern. This concern, he 
said, was due to the special difficulties experienced this year for 
the first time on the Boston campus in regard to personnel deci- 
sions. In the past, he observed, the continuous growth of the 
campus made this year's degree of stringent decision-making less 
necessary, since new faculty could always be added. This strin- 
gency was clearly necessary now, he said, and the faculty could 
come to see "primary responsibility" as a responsibility instead of 
a privilege if it knew how to proceed from one level to another. 

President Wood observed that two points were at issue — 
communication and substance. He said communication is critical and 
he welcomed the delegation's expression of concern. He had met 
with deans and had pointed to statements he had made about the 
relationship of the five-year plans to personnel decisions, and 
about implementation of the Trustee vote of 1972 on institutional 
need. He added that he would be most willing to elaborate in the 
interest of continued communication. 

As to the substance of the issue, the President said, 
he was struck by the differences in pattern between the depart- 
mental recommendations on the Boston and Amherst campuses. He had 
been constrained to remand several cases to the Boston campus, 
while none to the Amherst campus. He also pointed out that insti- 
tutional need had been a factor in only one of the Boston cases. 
He reiterated his concern about the quality of the Boston depart- 
mental recommendations, and said he could not find enough evidence 
that the departments were aware of the costs of their recommenda- 
tions in terms of lost opportunities. 

The President said he was concerned about equity between 
tenure awards and the possibility of high-quality future appoint- 
ments, as well as the effect of tenure decisions on the future 
opportunities of younger faculty members. 

Several members of the delegation also expressed concern 
that the faculty have adequate time to review the personnel poli- 
cies document before Trustee action, but in time for the 1976 
tenure decisions. Chairman Troy thanked the delegation and said 
the members of the Committee would consider its presentation 
thoughtfully. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The next item on the agenda was the Establishment of a 
Department of Radiology at UM/Worcester (Doc. T75-112) . As an over- 
view of the proposal, Vice President Lynton informed the Committee 
that a comprehensive plan for Medical School departments was still 
under review, but that Radiology was an essential department for 
the opening of the teaching hospital. Acting Dean Butcher pointed 
out to the Committee that this was to be a diagnostic department, 
not involved with radiation therapy. Upon motion made and seconded, 
it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees establish 
a Department of Radiology at the University of 
Massachusetts Medical School, as described in 
Doc. T75-112. 

The Chairman directed the Committee's attention to a 
related item, the Establishment of a Department of Nuclear Medicine 
at UM/Worcester (Doc. T75-113) . Acting Dean Butcher said the 
department would serve a bridging function between the Departments 
of Medicine and Radiology, and would interface with both. He 
reiterated that this department was also not to be involved with 
radiation therapy except in a single, limited sense, but was con- 
cerned mainly with identification of tumors. A motion was made 
and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees establish 
a Department of Nuclear Medicine at the University 
of Massachusetts Medical School, as described in 
Doc. T75-113. 

The next item of business was that of two New Appointments 
with Tenure at UM/Worcester (Docs. T75-114, T75-115) . After a brief 
presentation and discussion of the role and qualifications of the 
individuals, upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur 
with the President's appointment with tenure of 
Dr. Lloyd E. Hawes as Professor of Radiology at 
the University of Massachusetts Medical School, 
as described in Doc. T75-114. 

and it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur 
in the President's appointment with tenure of 
Dr. Arthur A. Like as Professor of Pathology at 
the University of Massachusetts Medical School, 
as described in Doc. T75-115. 



4571 

F & EP Comm. 
4-22-75 

UM/Worcester — 
Establishment 
of a Department 
of Radiology 
(Doe. T75-112) 



UM/Worcester — 
Establishment 
of a Department 
of Nuclear 
Medicine 
(Doc. T75-113) 



UM/Worcester — 
New Appointments 
with Tenure 
(Docs. T75-114 
and 115) 



4572 

F & EP Comm. 
4-22-75 

UM/Amherst — 
Establishment 
of a Degree in 
Environmental 

COMMITTEE 

Sciences 
(Doc. T75-105) 



Approval of 
Spring 
Graduation Lists 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Troy turned to the matter of the proposed Estab- 
lishment of a Degree in Environmental Sciences at UM/Amherst (Doc. 
T75-105). Professor Gunner said the program existed without a 
formal designation. He said it would be small: about forty or 
fifty students. A short discussion ensued about specific plans 
and requirements, after which a motion was made and seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees estab- 
lish a Bachelor of Science Degree in Environmental 
Sciences at the University of Massachusetts at 
Amherst, as described in Doc. T75-105. 

Finally, the meeting turned to the Approval of Spring 
Graduation Lists . After a motion was made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the undergraduate, graduate and Division of 
Continuing Education degrees to be awarded by 
UM/Amherst on May 31, 1975, by the Stockbridge 
School of Agriculture at UM/Amherst on May 30, 
1975, by UM/Boston on May 29, 1975, and by 
UM/Worcester on May 24, 1975, subject to the 
completion of course and other requirements 
and final certification by the Registrar at 
each campus . 

There was no other business to come before the Committee, 
and the meeting was adjourned at 1:05 p.m. 



■ 



■ 



Gladys UKeith Hardy I 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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COMMITTEE 



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4573 



PRESENT: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

April 22, 1975; 4:00 p.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 



Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Gordon, President 
Wood; Trustees Robertson, Rowland, Spiller, Secretary 
Hardy, Treasurer Johnson; Ms. Eichel, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Mr. Gartenberg, Budget 
Director; Mr. Lewis, Staff Assistant, Office of the 
Budget; Mr. Searson, General Counsel 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery, Mr. Gluckstern, Vice 
Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Gulko, 
Budget Director 

UM/Boston : Mr. Hamilton, Vice Chancellor for Administra- 
tion and Finance; Mr. Baxter, Director, Budget and 
Control 

UM/Worcester : Mr. Cathey, Controller; Dr. Goodman, 
Chairman, Department of Physiology 



The meeting was called to order by Chairman Gordon at 



4: 12 p .m, 



At the request of the Chairman, Chancellor Bromery 
reported on the status of the petition of the University of Massa- 
chusetts Tenants Association for a rollback on rents for the 
current academic year. Chancellor Bromery said the UMTA had met 
with Vice Chancellor Gage, Mr. Forsyth, Assistant to the Chancellor, 
and representatives of the Office of Residential Life in response 
to the request of the Board of Trustees. The administration and 
the students, he said, came to a tentative agreement in which the 
students agreed to turn over to the University the money now in 
escrow and not to demand the rent rollback, in return for which 
the University agreed to explore the possibility of cooperative 
management of the married students housing units. To this end, a 
statement of understanding was signed by both parties. 

Chancellor Bromery said that the agreement between the 
administration and the students precluded the need for a meeting 
between the students and the Trustee Committees on Finance and 
Student Affairs. Chairman Gordon expressed concern that the 



UM/Amherst — 
Married Stu- 
dents Housing 
Petition 



4 5 74 

Finance Comm. 
4-22-75 

UM/Amherst — 
Married Students 
Housing Petition 

COMMITTEE 



Agreement with 
Coopers & 
Lybrand, 
Auditors 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Trustees not break faith with the students, with whom they had 
promised to meet, and the Chancellor agreed to ask the UMTA for a 
written statement that they no longer wished to meet with the 
Trustees on this matter. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To receive the April 16, 1975, progress report 
from Dr. Gage, Vice Chancellor for Student 
Affairs, regarding the negotiations between the 
UM/Amherst administration and the University 
of Massachusetts Tenants Association as an 
information item only, with the understanding 
that any proposal resulting from the Statement 
of Understanding (April 14, 1975), would be 
examined by the University Counsel before pre- 
sentation to the Board of Trustees. 

On motion made and seconded, the Committee at 4:20 p.m. 

VOTED : To go into executive session to discuss the 
audit of the School of Education with repre- 
sentatives of the firm of Coopers & Lybrand, 
which has been retained to complete an inde- 
pendent audit of the School. 

At 4:50 p.m. the Committee concluded the executive 
session. 

President Wood told the Committee that three meetings 
had been held with representatives of Coopers & Lybrand regarding 
the external audit of the School of Education and that a contract 
proposal had been signed authorizing the following: 

The auditors will perform their work in two phases. 
Under Phase I they will develop an understanding of grant and con- 
tract accounting at the University, flow chart their understanding 
of the systems and procedures, confirm their understanding by 
selecting transactions and testing through key financial and 
operational control points in the system, and issue a report of 
their findings and their recommendations for improvement. This 
phase is estimated to require eleven man weeks of time by the 
staff of Coopers & Lybrand. Under Phase II, the auditors will 
test all contracts and grants of the School of Education originating 
during FY 1973 and FY 1974, and test all grants and contracts 
originating in FY 1970, FY 1971, and FY 1972 whose principal 
investigators were different from those tested in FY 1973 and FY 
1974. This phase is estimated to require twenty-five man weeks of 
time by the staff of Coopers & Lybrand. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 



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COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
ratify and approve the action of the President 
in negotiating a contract between the University 
and Coopers & Lybrand, Auditors, as set forth 
in the Agreement dated April 11, 1975. 

The Chairman then turned to the agenda item dealing with 
a proposed amendment to the Tuition Waiver Policies (Doc. T75-075B) 
as set forth in Foreign Student Tuition Waivers (Doc. T75-117) . 
At Chairman Gordon's request, Secretary Hardy reviewed the history 
of this item, saying that at the time the Board of Trustees voted 
to adopt the tuition waiver policies, Chancellor Golino had raised 
a question of equity with regard to the allotment of tuition waivers 
to foreign students on the Boston campus as contrasted with those 
on the Amherst campus. The Chancellor had subsequently submitted 
a proposal to the President's Office, which was also discussed with 
the Chancellor at UM/Amherst, amending the policy as it affects 
foreign students on both campuses. 

A brief discussion ensued as to the intent of the amend- 
ment. Mr. Hamilton said that since the total number of foreign 
students at UM/Boston is small, a stipulation that awards be made 
to only ten percent of the foreign students puts the Boston campus 
at a disadvantage. Therefore, if the number of foreign students 
enrolled is fewer than 200, the amendment would enable the campus 
to have as many as 20 foreign student tuition waivers. After 
various suggestions with regard to clarifying this point in the 
vote, it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 

University's Tuition Waiver Policies as set forth 
in Trustee Document T75-075B be amended by 
inserting a new section 3.2 to read, in its 
entirety, as follows: 

3.2 Foreign Students 

A tuition waiver for foreign students is an 
appropriate method of encouraging and enabling 
foreign students to attend the University. 
Emphasis should be placed on students from geo- 
graphic areas currently underrepresented at the 
University in order to encourage cross-cultural academic 
interchange at the University. These tuition 
waivers are to be awarded on the basis of financial 
need and are authorized up to a maximum of ten 
percent of the total number of foreign students 
attending the granting campus, to be allotted 
either to foreign graduate or undergraduate stu- 
dents in direct proportion to their representation 
on the granting campus; provided, however, if the 
total number of foreign students enrolled on the 
granting campus is 200 or less, the maximum number 
of tuition waivers may be twenty. 



4575 

Finance Comm. 
4-22-75 

Agreement with 
Coopers & 
Lybrand 



Amendment to 
Tuition Waiver 
Policies 
(Doc. T75-075B) 
Foreign Student 
Tuition Waivers 
(Doc. T75-117) 



4576 

Finance Comm. 
4-22-75 

Ohio Land Sale 



COMMITTEE 



State System of 
Advances for 
Payroll Accounts 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

At the request of the Chairman, Counsel Searson intro- 
duced discussion with regard to the recent request by Nationwide 
Development Company to amend the original agreement for sale of 
the land in Ohio held by the University under the Murray D. Lincoln 
Trust. 

Since the Committee had last met, he said, the Treasurer 
and he had met with representatives from Nationwide to discuss the 
proposed amendment. Mr. Searson said the original agreement had 
been for the sale of both parcels of land as one package. 
Currently, Nationwide is proposing that the package be split, with 
the sale of Parcel I at this time, and the sale of Parcel II at 
such time as multi-zoning is obtained. 

He enumerated the various changes from the original 
agreement and indicated the advantages and disadvantages of accept- 
ing Nationwide 1 s proposed amendment. A recent survey, he said, has 
indicated variances in the acreage of the two parcels, resulting 
in a net decrease in acreage of two acres. Nationwide does not 
wish to change the total selling price, but does want the option 
of canceling the agreement to purchase Parcel II in the event that 
zoning for multi-family housing is not successful. 

Chairman Gordon asked that copies of the recent survey 
be provided to the Committee. Trustee Spiller suggested that 
President Wood and counsel proceed informally to determine the 
current market value of these parcels of land. The Chairman pro- 
posed that no action be taken by the Committee at this time. 

Chairman Gordon asked Treasurer Johnson to speak to the 
subject of the new state system of advances for payroll accounts, 
which is to go into effect in July. He said that this system 
creates many problems for the University because of the way the 
account is set up with the bank and the way in which the University 
computer is programmed. He said that currently employees who are 
paid from several sources of funds receive one paycheck for the 
total amount. This will no longer be possible. The New England 
Merchants Bank has been designated by the Commonwealth as the bank 
in which money for the University payroll will be deposited. This 
will cause some inconvenience to the many employees at UM/ Amherst. 
This system will also result in a loss of considerable interest, 
since the University will no longer be able to keep the money in 
interest-bearing accounts and manage its own transactions. 



Trustee Spiller asked if the University had ever con- 
sidered paying its employees on a bi-weekly basis. He said this 
would effect a substantial savings. 

Treasurer Johnson said he expected to present a proposal 
for changes in the University's accounting procedures which will 
allow implementation of the state's plan before the July 1 deadline 



I 



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COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Gordon asked Treasurer Johnson to invite Mr. John 
Wood of Standish, Ayer & Wood, Investment Counselors, to report on 
University investments at the May meeting of the Committee. 
Treasurer Johnson informed the Committee that Joseph Albert has put 
a binder on the proposed general liability insurance coverage as 
of April 1 and that Counsel O'Leary is currently reviewing the 
policy. Negotiations are underway on additional coverage. 

Secretary Hardy announced that in May the Finance Commit- 
tee will meet jointly with the Committee on the Budget to discuss 
fee-based budgets of the campuses. Chairman Gordon requested that 
the Finance Committee meet at 10:00 a.m. on May 27, to be joined 
by the Committee on the Budget at 1:00 p.m. 

There being no further business, the meeting adjourned 
at 5:52 p.m. 



4577 

Finance Comm, 
4-22-75 

Report of 

Investment 

Counsel 



^Gladys(keith Hardy 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4 5 78 



COMMITTEE 



Progress Report 
on Proposed 
Academic 

Personnel Policy 
(Doc. T75-125) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

May 7, 1975; 11:00 a.m. 

Medical Science Building, Room CC-114 
University of Massachusetts/Worcester 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Healey, President 
Wood; Trustees Carlson, Croce, Gordon, Knowles, Rowland, 
Shaler, Troy, Weldon; Mr. Callahan, representing 
Trustee Anrig; Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; 
Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice Presi- 
dent for Academic Affairs; Mr. Gartenberg, Budget 
Director; Mrs. Hanson, Assistant Budget Director; 
Mr. Kaplan, Assistant Vice President for Organization 
and Management; Mr. Keith, Associate Vice President for 
University Policy 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Gluckstern, Vice 
Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Gulko, 
Budget Director; Professor Shapiro, Acting Dean of the 
College of Natural Science and Mathematics 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino 

UM/Worcester : Acting Dean Butcher; Mr. Stockwell, 
Associate Dean for Administrative Affairs and Hospital 
Director; Dr. Wheeler, Hospital Chief of Staff 



The meeting was convened at 11:05 a.m. Chairman Healey 
called upon President Wood, who asked Vice President Lynton to 
address himself to the Progress Report on the Proposed Academic 
Personnel Policy (Doc. T75-125) . Filling in the Trustees on the 
background of the proposal, Mr. Lynton recalled that an ad hoc 
multi-campus committee had been appointed by the President a year 
and a half before to draft a personnel policy which would take into 
account the multi-campus nature of the University. The Committee 
had spent more than forty hours devising the first draft, which was 
transmitted to the President, thence to the campuses. A substantia 
review by the Amherst campus and an initial response from Boston 
have resulted in numerous amendments which had been incorporated 
into the draft which would be submitted to the Committee on 
Faculty and Educational Policy on May 13. 

Mr. Lynton said there had been an unfortunate delay in 
distribution of the draft on the Boston campus, and this had brough 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

about a dilemma: the Amherst campus was agreed on the need for the 
policy and felt ready for the present draft to be acted upon and 
implemented for next year's personnel actions, while the Boston 
campus felt further study by members of its faculty was necessary 
before the policy could be properly submitted to the Trustees. 

Mr. Lynton said compromise had been discussed at a meeting 
between the President and representatives of the faculties of both 
campuses. The policy would be presented to the Trustees for 
approval for one year, after which the Trustees would need to vote 
again on the Personnel Policy and at that time amendments could be 
proposed if dissatisfactions remained. Mr. Lynton assured the 
Chairman that everyone at the meeting believed this to be the 
fairest approach. Mr. Lynton explained that the Committee on 
Faculty and Educational Policy would be dealing with this policy at 
its next meeting and if it should recommend action to the Board, 
the Executive Committee would then have to vote the policy at the 
June Committee meeting. 

Next came a request for a Special Delegation of Authority 
for UM/ Amherst . The President explained that this was an author- 
ization to Chancellor Bromery to be signator of a technical 
assistance agreement between UM/Amherst and the Government of 
Ecuador. Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees authorize 
Chancellor Randolph W. Bromery or his designee to 
execute all necessary contracts and documents for 
and in behalf of the University of Massachusetts, 
through its School of Education, with the Government 
of Ecuador; to thereby continue the program whereby 
the University of Massachusetts will use its efforts 
to render technical advice and assistance to the 
Government of Ecuador for the purpose of developing 
effective methods and materials to create sequential 
systems of nonformal education and for related pur- 
poses all as set forth in the contract to be signed 
between the said parties dated in May 1975, a copy 
of which contract shall be on file with the Office 
of the Treasurer, University of Massachusetts. 
Said contract term shall be from May 1, 1975, to 
March 31, 1976. 

The next matter was proposed Classification of Position 
Titles at UM/Worcester (Doc. T75-127) . Mr. Stockwell explained 
that the two position classifications — Chief Clinical Laboratory 
Technician and Supervising Nuclear Laboratory Technician — were 
essential to the scheduled opening of the teaching hospital. Upon 
motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 

the Classification of Position Titles, UM/Worcester , 
as contained in Doc. T75-127. 



4 5 79 

Exec. Comm. 
5-7-75 

Progress Report 
on Proposed 
Academic 

Personnel Policy 
(Doc. T75-125) 



UM/Amherst — 
Delegation of 
Authority 



UM/Worcester — 

Classification 

of Position 

Titles 

(Doc. T75-127) 



4 5 80 



Exec. Comm, 
5-7-75 

Executive 
Session 



COMMITTEE 

Personnel 
Actions 

(Docs. T75-123, 
124 and 128) 



Honorary 
Degrees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To enter executive session to discuss personnel 
actions and honorary degrees. 

After the executive session, motions were made and 
seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees confirm 
and approve the Personnel Actions as contained 
in Trustee Document T75-123. 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees confirm 
and approve the Personnel Action, UM/Worcester , 
as contained in Trustee Document T75-124. 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees confirm 
and approve the salary adjustment, President's 
Office, as contained in Trustee Document T75-128. 

and it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees confirm 
the additional candidate for an Honorary Degree 
to be awarded at the UM/Amherst 1975 Commencement 
as agreed upon in Executive Session of the Exec- 
utive Committee of this date and instruct the 
Chancellor of the campus to proceed with necessary 
arragements . 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:30 p.m. 



$bladyfcJ Keith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



I 



COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON THE BUDGET 

May 7, 1975; 12:30 p.m. 

Medical Sciences Building, Room SF1-6 
University of Massachusetts at Worcester 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Carlson; Trustees 

Breyer, Croce, Gordon, Savini, Troy; Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Office of the President : Mr. Gartenberg, Budget Director; 
Mrs. Hanson, Assistant Budget Director 



The meeting was convened at 12:40 p.m. Chairman Carlson 
explained that the meeting was made necessary by a lack of a quorum 
at the Committee's regularly scheduled meeting on April 16. In 
order for the Committee to make its recommendations to the full 
Board of Trustees later in the afternoon, it would be necessary to 
consider the two votes which could not be taken at the earlier 
meeting. 

The first item was the proposed Adjustments to FY 75 
Operating Budget (Doc. T75-103) at UM/Amherst. Chairman Carlson 
explained the proposal, which had been fully discussed at the 
earlier meeting of the Committee. Upon a motion made and seconded, 
it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the revised operating budget for the Amherst 
campus as set forth in Doc. T75-103. 

The second item of business was a Trust Fund Interest 
Request for Fund Allocation from Reserves (Doc. T75-104) . The 
Chairman again recapitulated the discussion at the April meeting. 
A motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the transfer of funds from the Trustee Reserve 
Account to the Trust Fund Interest Account for 
the purposes outlined in Doc. T75-104 in the 
amount of $49,000. 

This completed the necessary business, and the meeting 
was adjourned at 12:50 p.m. 



^ladyfl Keith Hardy 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4581 



33TTIMMD3 



UM/Amherst — 

Adjustments to 

FY 75 Operating 

Budget 

(Doc. T75-103) 



Trust Fund 
Interest Request 
for Fund Alloca- 
tion from 
Reserves 
(Doc. T75-104) 



4 582 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

May 7, 1975; 12:30 p.m. 

Room SF1-6 
Medical Sciences Building 
University of Massachusetts/Worcester 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Knowles, President 
Wood; Trustees Clark, Eddy, Haigis, Shearer, Treasurer 
Johnson, Miss Eichel, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Robinson 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Littlefield, 
Director of Planning 



The meeting was called to order at 12:40 p.m. by Chairman 
Knowles, who said that her principal reason for calling the meeting 
was to alert the Committee to activity in Bristol County with 
regard to the John F. Kennedy Library site. She said that to 
encourage the trustees of the Kennedy Corporation to consider a 
site in the area, the Bristol County Development Council had 
adopted a formal resolution of endorsement, which had been circula- 
ted in its newsletter. The resolution, which Chairman Knowles 
read, indicated that the Council would support a joint effort by 
Southern Massachusetts University and Battleship Cove to locate 
the Library and/or Museum in Bristol County. 

Chairman Knowles said she had asked for a list of the 
advantages and disadvantages of providing a site for the library 
complex at UM/Amherst or UM/Boston from the viewpoint of the 
University and from the viewpoint of the Kennedy Corporation in 
order to be sure that Committee members were fully informed. 

President Wood indicated that the work of the Kennedy 
Corporation staff had been so extensive and so sophisticated that 
he thought the seriousness of their interest in both UMass sites 
was beyond question. He stated that the University had no 
preference for one University site over the other. Trustee Clark 
asked that an additional item be added to the list of advantages 
for the UM/Boston site — that of the strong faculty support 
indicated by the number of signatures affixed to a petition for the 
Library circulated on the campus. Vice President Robinson agreed 
to add this to the list. 

Chairman Knowles asked if a further action by the Board 
of Trustees was needed in order to invite the location of the 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Library on a University site. Mr. Littlef ield, in response to this 
query, commented that the Kennedy Corporation was well aware of the 
desire of the University to house the complex, and that the concern 
of the Corporation had been to determine if the surrounding 
communities were also in support of location of the Library in 
their area. 

It was the consensus of the Committee that no action need 
be taken. There being no other business before the Committee, the 
meeting adjourned at 1:00 p.m. 



4583 

B & G Comm. 
5-7-75 



0Ladys Keith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4 5 84 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Boston — 
B.A. Degree in 
Black Studies 
and Creation of 
Black Studies on 
Boston Campus 
(Doc. T75-126) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

May 13, 1975; 11:00 a.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Troy, President 

Wood; Trustees Breyer, Snowden; Mr. Callahan, represent- 
ing Trustee Anrig; Secretary Hardy, Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Administration, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice Presi- 
dent for Academic Affairs; Mrs. Wolfman, Assistant Vice 
President for Academic Programs; Ms. Crosson, Staff 
Associate for Academic Affairs; Mr. Searson, General 
Counsel; Father Walsh, Academic Advisor to the President 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Gluckstern, Special 
Executive Assistant to the Chancellor for Academic 
Affairs; Mr. Alfange, Acting Vice Chancellor for Academic 
Affairs and Provost; Professor Booth, Secretary of the 
Faculty Senate; Professor Fletcher, Faculty Representative; 
Professor Maki, member of the Ad Hoc Personnel Policies 
Committee 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Spaethling, Vice 
Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Babcock, 
Executive Assistant Chancellor; Dean Freeland; Professor 
Gagnon, Faculty Representative; Professor Katz; 
Professor Schiavo-Campo , Faculty Co-Chairperson of the 
Assembly; Professor Wolozin, member of the Ad Hoc 
Personnel Policies Committee 

UM/Worcester : Dr. Goodman, Dr. Saunders, member of the 
Ad Hoc Personnel Policies Committee 

Guest : Kelvin Abron, Student Intern from Jeremiah E. 
Burke High School, Boston 



The meeting was convened at 11:05 a.m. Chairman Troy 
informed all present that the first matter to be considered would 
be item two on the agenda, a proposed B.A. Degree in Black Studies 
and Creation of Black Studies Department on the Boston Campus 
(Doc. T75-126) . Vice Chancellor Spaethling briefed the Committee 
on the proposal, explaining that there was already an Afro-American 
Studies Program on the Boston campus. He had been concerned with 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

seeing this program develop academic strength and a meaningful 
curriculum in order to attract highly qualified faculty. Without 
departmental status, he pointed out, the program could not make 
appointments and had to depend on faculty from other departments 
on "release time." This was a problem, he said, because of the 
current fiscal circumstances. He also observed that such persons 
could not give all of their time to the program. 

Mr. Spaethling continued that he had been concerned with 
the academic viability of the program, and said the only way to 
strengthen the weaker areas of the program and thus to strengthen 
its faculty recruitment was to give it departmental status. In his 
view, he said, the department should not be only for black students 
but should be an important field in its own right, akin to other 
ethnic and racial fields. He added that the changed status would 
have the effect of expanding the effectiveness of the four full- 
time faculty members in the program, because they would no longer 
have to give service to other departments. 

Trustee Snowden expressed her strong support of the pro- 
posal, saying that she had long hoped it could be brought to a 
reality. She said she saw a strong program as a high priority, in 
addition to a highly qualified faculty. It was therefore moved, 
seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees establish 
a B.A. Degree in Black Studies and a Department of 
Black Studies at the University of Massachusetts 
at Boston, as described in Doc. T75-126. 

The next item was a Progress Report on the College of 
Professional Studies at UM/Boston . Dean Freeland reviewed for the 
Committee the history of the College, citing dates on which 
development phases were approved. In the past year, he said, eight 
faculty had been hired, including three with tenure, but regrettably 
one of the tenured appointments (Shirley Arbesfeld) did not accept 
the offer. Responding to the desire of the President and the 
Trustees for inter-institutional cooperation, he and his staff had 
contacted all the business schools in the area. The contacts had 
been encouraging, he added, especially that with Northeastern 
University to which we have suggested contractual arrangements to 
provide certain courses for College IV students. 

Chairman Troy asked about the cost of such arrangements, 
and Dean Freeland replied that it was less expensive to send stu- 
dents to Northeastern University to take courses than to appoint 
full-time faculty. He also said there had been no formal reply 
from Northeastern to the cooperative proposal, but said he was 
optimistic that it would be the first of several successful liaisons 

The Dean reported that the goal was for 250 students for 
the opening of the College in September, 1975. One thousand to 



4585 



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B.A. Degree in 
Black Studies 
and Creation of 
Black Studies 
Department on 
Boston Campus 
(Doc. T75-126) 



UM/Boston — 
Progress Report 
on College IV 



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Progress Report 
on College IV 



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Academic 
Personnel 
Policies 
(Doc. T75-125) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

eleven hundred applications had been received, two hundred of which 
were from UM/Boston students who want to transfer to College IV. 
He added that the freshman class had been accepted and that they 
are able to start in September as planned. 

Dean Freeland set forth four central objectives of the 
College: (a) To achieve a balance between liberal arts and pro- 
fessional studies; (b) To prepare students for a variety of insti- 
tutional settings; (c) To achieve a balance between specialized 
training and general management skills; and (d) To lay great 
stress on the importance of practical experience for students and 
the involvement of practitioners in the program. 

June, 1976 would be the beginning of a two-year experi- 
mental period, he said, during which the college would try to 
remain uncommitted as to its subsequent directions. And during 
this time, the College would strive to avoid repetition of programs 
of Colleges I and II, which would supply the liberal arts and 
science components of the program. 

Trustee Snowden remarked that the program sounded like 
a happy marriage between the academic and service functions. She 
said she was aware of a great need for persons with management 
skills in nonprofit institutions, many of whom need remedial help 
before they can be effective in that setting. Dean Freeland 
described other service efforts, including a "triangular" arrange- 
ment being developed between UM/Boston, industry and the high 
school where students are identified to participate in this program, 
which could lead to jobs for those who successfully complete it. 

He added that another high priority area of his planning 
was to encourage the development of a minor in management in 
Colleges I and II. Mr. Schiavo-Campo added that discussions about 
cooperative arrangements between the economics department in 
Colleges I and IV were under way. 

There was further discussion, after which Mr. Spaethling 
said that Dean Freeland deserved much credit for his efforts and 
successes. He made the added point that the liberal arts com- 
ponent of the College needs careful study and close monitoring 
for the sake of proper cohesiveness in the context of campus pro- 
grams. The Chairman agreed. 

Chairman Troy then directed the Trustees to the final 
item on the agenda, the proposed Academic Personnel Policies (Doc. 
T75-125) . The President began discussion of this matter, 
describing the Personnel Policies document as a University-wide 
effort on a significant subject. He complimented Professor John 
Maki for his leadership as well as the other members of the Ad Hoc 
Multicampus Personnel Policies Committee, several of whom were 
present. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

There could be no doubt, he said, of the importance of 
the action which the Committee was being asked to take, as suggested 
by the supportive letters of the Chancellors. He said the Univer- 
sity was moving from a period when the consensus which had existed 
about the meaning and direction of academic life had allowed a 
spontaneous regulation of faculty relationships to a period when 
law, rights, and privileges were becoming increasingly important. 
For this reason, this attempt to regularize the character of pro- 
fessional life is enormously important. 

President Wood explained that the proposal before the 
Committee represented an effort to accept the substance of the 
document, to acknowledge the calendar differences between the 
campuses and to acknowledge the reality of the situation with 
respect to collective bargaining. 

What was being asked, said the President, was adoption 
of the policy on a provisional basis, while maintaining an under- 
standing of the calendar of the Boston campus and of the needs of 
the Amherst campus. Finally, the President mentioned that Counsel 
Searson had reviewed the document and would be outlining his con- 
cerns and questions. 

At this point, the Chairman called upon Vice President 
Lynton to give a background review of the Committee's effort. 
Mr. Lynton observed that the Committee had worked for sixty meeting 
hours to devise the document. He praised the work of Ms. Pat 
Crosson, without whose help, he said, there could not have been 
a document. 

Mr. Lynton said the purpose of the document was to give 
both faculty and the institution protection, while relating it to 
the University Governance Statement. The most difficult issue was 
that of adjectives; the Committee had striven to avoid vagueness, 
but had agreed that some phrases which had acquired symbolic 
meaning of transcendant significance should be included. 

There was work left to do, he said: there were major 
gaps in the issues of grievance, dismissal, the role of part-time 
faculty, and leave policy which would have to be addressed. But 
these articles (Articles I-VI which constituted Doc. T75-125) 
represented the essential elements needed for the regular personnel 
action during the coming academic year. 

The Chairman recognized Chancellor Bromery of the Amherst 
campus, who observed that many additional hours of work by Professor 
Maki and the faculty had taken place on the Amherst campus in 
addition to the sixty meeting hours. He said it had been discussed 
several times in depth by the Faculty Senate, for which Professor 
Booth deserved much credit. The Chancellor affirmed the need for 
the policies this year, despite its present state of imperfection, 
and added that there was probably no faculty member on the campus 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

who did not know about the policy in detail. 

The President cited his earlier remark that Counsel 
Searson had reservations about some of the language used in the 
document, and he asked Mr. Searson to verbalize a few of these 
instances so that the members of the Personnel Policies Committee 
could get a sense of the legal implications of what may be estab- 
lished academic terminology. 

Mr. Searson 's first point was the vagueness he saw in 
the language "full, fair, and impartial consideration of the 
evidence" as it related to consideration of personnel decisions. 
He felt these words to be subject to differing interpretation, and 
suggested that nothing would be lost in eliminating them. Two 
members of the Personnel Policies Committee disagreed, saying that 
the terminology had meaning to faculty members and arguing that 
it remained for the campuses to flesh out ways for the policies 
to be applied. 

Mr. Searson then cited the statement that faculty 
personnel recommendations would be reversed by the President only 
in "rare cases and upon compelling reasons stated in detail." The 
problem with this, he said, was that it tended to controvert the 
appointing authority granted by the Legislature to the Trustees 
and subsequently delegated to the President. There were several 
conflicting views on the legal issues surrounding delegation of 
authority, and it was pointed out that the document does contain 
specific reference to the limitation on delegation of authority 
to administrative officials, and to Board approval. Mr. Searson 
said he was also concerned about the language of rare and compelling 
with respect to potential grievances. The standard of "compelling" 
could be interpreted differently by different groups and give rise 
to many grievances. 

Following a few attempts at measuring the meaning of 
the words "rare and compelling," Professor Maki pointed out that 
the discussion itself provided a good example of why this document 
is so important, because without a policy, the interpretation of 
the words — full, fair, impartial, rare, compelling — are all points 
of contention. A policy would improve the implementation of 
personnel actions, he said. Chairman Troy asked Mr. Searson to 
prepare a memo for the Executive Committee, which would have to 
consider the document before it was sent to the full Board, 
addressing the question of whether the present ambiguities of 
language could so tie up the personnel process that the policy 
would become unworkable. 

A third concern of Mr. Searson was the provision that an 
aggrieved faculty member could examine his personnel file. He 
observed that no Trustee policy authorized a faculty member to 
see his own file. The proposed policy document provides that the 
faculty member supply the materials for the file, that 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

recommendations of committees and administrative officers become 
part of the file and that copies of such recommendations be for- 
warded to the faculty member, and the file may include letters of 
recommendation. There followed a discussion about what constituted 
a personnel file, and about which items should or should not be 
kept confidential. 

The meeting was recessed at 1:00 p.m. for lunch, and 
reconvened at 1:30 p.m. The Chairman initiated a page-by-page 
survey of the document, asking anyone present to mention possible 
amendments or problems. The following questions were raised: 

Mr. Searson suggested that Article I, Section 1.4, 
"Probationary Period," be amended to read: ". . .without being 
awarded tenure, not including a terminal appointment subject to 
Section 6.2f." 

Trustee Breyer questioned whether Article III, Section 
3.5 (b) was explicit enough in setting up the College or School 
Personnel Committee as primarily faculty or primarily administra- 
tive in emphasis. 

Mr. Babcock observed that the last sentence of Article 
III, Section 3.13 (c) was redundant. The Chairman agreed that 
there seemed to be considerable redundancy in the document. 

The Chairman suggested that the phrase "equivalent pro- 
fessional experience" in Article IV, Section 4.4 (b) might be too 
vague. 

With regard to Article IV, Section 4.12 (d) , it was 
suggested that this should contain the word "salaried" after the 
words "full-time" in order to clarify the issue for Medical School 
faculty. It was also felt that this section is not intended to 
apply to adjunct professors whose principal responsibilities are 
administrative, such as the director of the Mental Health Center 
on the Amherst campus who is also an adjunct professor of 
psychology. It was agreed that those whose titles are essentially 
honorific should not be included in this provision. 

The Chairman expressed the view that the phrase "reason- 
able assurance" in Article IV, Section 4.10 (b) might be too weak. 
The same point was made about Article IV, Section 4.14 (a). 

Professor Schiavo-Campo suggested that Article IV, 
Section 4.14 (b) specify that the individual, not only the project, 
was intended to return to the University after a sabbatical leave. 

With respect to Article V, Section 5.1 (d) , several 
questions were raised about the probationary period and the timing 
of personnel reviews and decisions. Dean Alfange noted that the 
requirement for at least a two-year appointment or reappointment 



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Personnel 

Policies 

(Doc. T75-125) 

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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

leading to the TDY, plus the right to be considered for tenure if 
given an appointment into the TDY limited some of the flexibility- 
current ly enjoyed by the campuses. Chairman Troy suggested that 
these provisions might be further scrutinized. 

Chairman Troy and the President said that they were 
uncomfortable about the standards established in Article V, 
Section 5.2 (b) . It was pointed out that these were minimum 
responsibilities as conditions of employment, not standards to be 
used in personnel reviews and decisions. The Chairman remarked 
that he was still uncomfortable with the language. Chairman Troy 
also asked that a comma be placed between the word "and" and the 
word "for" in Article VI, Section 6.4 (f-3) . 



f 



"may" 



m 

I! 



Counsel Searson suggested that the word 
Article VI, Section 6.10 be replaced with the word "must," to 
insure that an error can be corrected when it happens, rather 
than after the full review process has taken place. Several 
present disagreed with such a change. 

Professor Schiavo-Campo stated for the record that the 
official position of the UM/Boston Assembly was that the Personnel 
Policies had not been given adequate discussion on the Boston 
campus, and that they should not be put into effect for personnel 
decisions for the coming academic year. He said the suggestion 
that a compromise had been reached on this issue was incorrect, 
and said the Steering Committee of the University Assembly was not 
in a position to compromise, that it was acting upon instructions 
by the Assembly. 

There followed a description of the advantages of the 
review calendar proposed by the Boston campus, after which Pro- 
fessor Booth remarked that he had thought that the agreement worked 
out in discussions with the President would in fact allow the 
Boston campus to carry out its discussions pursuant to their calen- 
dar and review the document but that adoption as a provisional 
policy would permit implementation of the policies which are 
essential to serve as a reference to all faculty and to protect 
faculty rights. 

Dr. Goodman, speaking as the representative of the 
Worcester campus, expressed support for the document. However, 
he pointed out a problem which will need to be resolved with the 
President's Office, that many of the Medical School faculty were 
hired without a clear understanding of the tenure year or the 
probationary year. 

There was further discussion, during which Professor Maki 
expressed the Personnel Policies Committee's appreciation for 
Mr. Lynton's patience, skill, and endurance as Chairman. It was 
also clarified that since the Personnel Policies Committee was 
represented, the few changes in the document upon which all were 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

agreed could be incorporated at this meeting. These changes 
were: (1) elimination of the words, "Revised Draft of Articles 
I-VI of an . . . " from the title of the document, (2) the addition 
to Article I, Section 1.4 described above, (3) the addition of the 
comma in Article VI, Section 6.4 (f-3) described above, and (4) 
addition of "salaried" between "full-time" and "special" in 
Article IV, Section 4.12 (d) . 

A motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Executive Committee approve, 
and the Board of Trustees adopt, the University- 
Academic Personnel Policy contained in Doc. T75- 
125, as amended, provided, however, that Section 
6.1 (a) shall apply only to instructors appointed 
after July 1, 1975; and 

To recommend that, recognizing the importance of 
accepting a permanent set of Academic Personnel 
Policies only after full discussion and evaluation 
by all members of the University community, and 
recognizing further the need for additional con- 
sideration by the Boston campus, the Board of 
Trustees determine that these policies remain in 
effect only until September 1, 1976; and 

To recommend to the Executive Committee and the 
Board of Trustees that T63-050, T64-061 (except 
for Part II, Articles 5-7), T73-069, and any 
other policy, rule or regulation incompatible 
with this Policy be rescinded; and 

To direct the President, after consultation 
with campus governance units and an ad hoc 
multi-campus academic personnel policy committee, 
to review said Policy and recommend any appro- 
priate modifications thereto no later than 
May, 1976. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:55 p.m. 



Gladys (keith Hardy U 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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(Doc. T75-125) 



4592 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Boston — 
New Directions 
Report 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON LONG-RANGE PLANNING 

May 14, 1975; 11:30 a.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Rowland, President 
Wood; Trustees Clark, Robertson, Spiller, Mr. Callahan, 
representing Commissioner Anrig; Secretary Hardy, Miss 
Eichel, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice Presi- 
dent for Academic Affairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President 
for Planning; Mr. Cooley, Assistant Vice President for 
Analytical Studies 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Hamilton, Vice 
Chancellor for Administration and Finance; Professor 
Gagnon, Faculty Representative 



The meeting was called to order at 11:30 a.m. Chairman 
Rowland said that at the last meeting of the Committee it had 
been decided to defer discussion of the paper prepared by Chan- 
cellor Golino concerning the Assembly's recommendations arising 
from the New Directions Committee Report until more time could be 
given to this important agenda item. Today's agenda, she said, 
would be devoted entirely to a discussion of this subject, and 
Chancellor Golino had been invited by the Committee to discuss 
his views and to answer questions raised by the Committee with 
regard to his March 28 report. Chairman Rowland welcomed Chan- 
cellor Golino and Vice Chancellor Hamilton to the meeting, stating 
that the Committee was desirous of having the benefit of the 
Chancellor's views as a basis for their deliberations prior to 
setting priorities in the long-range goals of the campus. 

Chancellor Golino said that his reason for coming to 
UM/Boston was and still is to create in the context of Boston 
higher education an institution of higher learning at the 
University level, to provide a high-quality education and the 
opportunity to do graduate work to a clientele which would not 
normally have an opportunity to go to college. He feels that if 
people who graduate from UM/Boston are unable to compete with 
graduates from other institutions in undergraduate, professional 
and graduate work, then the campus has failed. 



COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Chancellor Golino continued by stating that he had created 
the New Directions Committee for the purpose of learning how the 
faculty and students envisioned the mission of the campus. The 
Committee, he said, worked for a year in developing the report, 
after which the University Assembly spent another year reviewing 
and making recommendations regarding the report. At the end of 
the two years, he had written his comments and recommendations to 
the Report and the recommendations of the Assembly. His report 
consisted of three parts: first, an historical, philosophical 
overview of the campus; second, an explanation of how he reached 
each recommendation; and third, three specific Trustee votes (which 
he was not now suggesting for action) . 

The campus today, said the Chancellor, is trying to offer 
a varied education, and it is trying to offer this education, 
particularly, to those people in the surrounding communities who 
for various reasons have not thought of higher education as a 
possible goal and who do not have the financial means of getting a 
higher education elsewhere. 

He observed that the campus could become a transitional 
school in which emphasis would be in reaching into the high schools 
for students with potential but who will require extra assistance 
in the first two years of college. However, he pointed out, since 
UM/Boston was created, there have also come into being in the Boston 
area two community colleges which are engaged in college preparatory 
and occupational education, to a large extent filling this need. 
There are also in the area several state colleges, originally 
specializing in the preparation of teachers, but now undergoing a 
change in emphasis due to a declining need for teachers, which will 
very likely move into the fields of general and liberal arts 
education. 

He said there is one other transitional role — that con- 
cerned with the transition of undergraduates to preprof essional or 
professional schools, and post-graduate education — and that is 
where he sees a vacuum that he feels UM/Boston should proceed to 
fill. He said that although precollege, extended day, and summer 
programs — in addition to graduate education — should play a part in 
the education provided by UM/Boston, the time has come when the 
emphasis must be in one particular direction. He wanted to learn 
in which direction the Trustees feel this thrust should be made. 
He said he would like emphasis on graduate education to continue 
until ten percent of those enrolled would be engaged in graduate 
programs. He believes that if UM/Boston is to achieve university 
status, it must have graduate emphasis, and it should be the senior 
institution of publicly supported higher learning in the area. 

Chancellor Golino emphasized the importance to both 
faculty and students, as well as to administration, of knowing 
what the goals of the campus are and of knowing that these goals 



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I3TT!M 



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UM/Boston — 
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Report 

COMMITTEE 



Planning 
Operations 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

will remain constant. He said it is impossible to make long-range 
plans until this issue is settled. He stressed his desire to know 
whether or not the Committee sees the goals as he sees them, in 
order that he can proceed in the direction they determine. 

After the Chancellor's remarks, Professor Gagnon was 
invited into the meeting to make a statement to the Committee as 
faculty representative. Professor Gagnon said that he had asked 
to speak in order to support the Chancellor's report which he felt 
was important as it offered a balance between what he called the 
"remedial views" and the "elitist views" among the faculty. 

At the conclusion of Professor Gagnon 's comments, he left 
the meeting. After further brief discussion, the Committee 
recessed for lunch and informal discussion at 1:00 p.m. When the 
meeting was reconvened, Chancellor Golino and Vice Chancellor 
Hamilton were invited to rejoin the meeting. Chairman Rowland 
took this opportunity to thank Chancellor Golino for his report. 
It was felt that his remarks were of value in assisting the Com- 
mittee to arrive at a consensus of what the general priorities 
should be. 

The Committee next instructed the President and his 
staff to draft a statement for presentation to the Board of 
Trustees which will commend the Chancellor and the New Directions 
Committee for the work they have done, reaffirm the concept of 
UM/Boston as a university, and set forth the general recommendation^ 
of the Committee regarding the priorities for the UM/Boston campus 
as follows: (1) continued development in order to provide for 
maximum use of the facilities and the further development of 
undergraduate professional education, particularly in Colleges III 
and IV, (2) increased access, and (3) subsequent, selective 
development of graduate programs consistent with and within the 
context of total University-wide graduate education priorities. 

Chairman Rowland asked Chancellor Golino to inform the 
faculty at UM/Boston that the Committee on Long-Range Planning 
deeply appreciates the work represented by the report and commends 
them on their efforts. 

The Chancellor and Vice Chancellor departed from the 
meeting and the Committee talked briefly about the agenda for the 
June meeting, which is to include further discussion of enrollment 
planning at UM/Amherst. 

At the request of the Chairman, Mr. Cooley reviewed a 
planning exercise being carried on at the request of the President 
by the campus administrations, which attempts to examine available 
options for the campuses under various conditions of resources, 
enrollment, student mix, graduate and undergraduate programs and 
on- and off-campus activities. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Vice President Lynton commented on the need for a thorough 
review of the programs being offered in relation to the limited 
resources which would be available in the foreseeable future. 
There being no further discussion, the meeting adjourned at 2:25 p.m 



$Ladys fteith Hardy ° 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4595 

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Planning 
Options 



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4596 



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UM/Amherst — 
Campus Center 
Information 
Policy 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT AFFAIRS 

May 20, 1975; 1:00 p.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Shaler, President 
Wood: Trustees O'Keefe, Rothenburger , Shearer, and 
Snowden; Secretary Hardy; Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Mr. Keith, Associate Vice 
President for University Policy; Mr. Gartenberg, 
Budget Director; Mr. Searson, General Counsel; Mr. Cahill 
Staff Assistant 

UM/Amherst : Dr. Gage, Vice Chancellor for Student 
Affairs; Mr. Dean, Director of Residential Life; Mr. 
Gulko, Budget Director; Mr. Preston, Staff Associate 
for Student Affairs; Ms. Stack, Graduate Student 
Representative 

UM/Boston : Mr. Tubbs, Vice Chancellor for Student 
Affairs; Mr. Vannicelli, Associate Vice Chancellor for 
Student Affairs; Ms. Furman, Assistant to the Vice 
Chancellor for Student Affairs 

UM/Worcester : Dr. Smith, Associate Dean for Academic 
Affairs and Provost 

Guests : Lucia Bruno, Jackie Cormier, Bill Dorsch, 
Michael Federow, Larry Magid, Karen Mangan, Michael 
Parkhurst, Henry Ragin, James Starr, from the Amherst 
campus 



The meeting was called to order at 1:10 p.m. The 
Chairman began by reading a memorandum to the Committee from 
Chancellor Bromery which attached a memorandum from Vice Chancellor 
Gage explaining policies of the Campus Center with respect to the 
dissemination of information. The memorandum read, in part: 

"1. The Campus Center/Student Union has no "policy 
of withholding information .... On the con- 
trary, an enormous amount of staff time goes 
into sharing and explaining information with 
those who need it. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

"2. I (Dr. Gage) have confirmed the fact that the 

Board of Governors has never been denied infor- 
mation it requested. 

"3. Mr. Magid and Mr. Corker have agreed upon a 

means for sharing and understanding the infor- 
mation which Mr. Magid feels he needs." 

The Chairman explained to the Committee that a vote 
taken at the April meeting of the Committee on Student Affairs 
had been improperly worded, and he wished to insert Chancellor 
Bromery's reply into the record as a correction. 

Chairman Shaler next called upon Mr. Gartenberg to make 
a presentation about the first item on the formal agenda, Financial 
Aid to Medical Students. Mr. Gartenberg cited several figures: 
that in FY 1975 52 percent of the Worcester students receive 
financial aid, while about one-third of the aggregate students at 
the Amherst and Boston campuses receive financial aid. He suggested 
that equity should be achieved in the distribution of aid among the 
three campuses. He indicated that at present, limited information 
about the comparison between the three campuses was available and 
said a study should be developed as soon as possible. In the 
interim, in order to meet the needs of the medical students, the 
following action was proposed: (1) an increase in work-study 
funds equal to the percentage increase in enrollments, and (2) a 
doubling of the Worcester share of the state scholarship funds 
allocated to the University, bringing it to $12,000. These 
increases could be incorporated into the FY 1976 Operating Budget. 

Dr. Smith distributed a sheet of figures which revealed, 
among other statistics, that 79 medical students out of 150 receive 
financial aid. With the increase in students from 150 to 228 in 
the 1975-76 academic year, 118 students might need financial aid. 
Citing resources available to the Medical School, Dr. Smith calcu- 
lated that the unmet need for the 1975-76 academic year would total 
$101,000. 

After a brief discussion, Chairman Shaler asked if there 
was some definitive action that the Committee could take, since 
the matter had been unresolved for several months. Mr. Gartenberg 
indicated that if the suggestions which he had mentioned met with 
the Committee's approval, he could incorporate them into the 
operating budget for FY 1976. 

Dr. Smith said the Medical School was trying to train 
the kind of physicians who are interested in primary care and 
family practice and who therefore, would not make a great deal of 
money, and pointed out that students who are heavily saddled with 
debt are more likely to go into more lucrative areas of medicine. 



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UM/Worcester— 
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to Medical 
Students 



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Financial Aid 
to Medical 
Students 

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UM/Amherst — 

Residence Halls 

and Dining 

Commons 

(Doc. T75-130) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Wood emphasized the importance of gathering 
statistics on the financial position of graduate students on the 
Amherst and Boston campuses in order to maintain some parity 
between the kind of aid given medical students and that given 
graduate students at the other campuses. 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the Committee on Student Affairs support 
all efforts to increase financial aid to 
students at the Medical School. 

The Chairman turned next to Residence Halls and Dining 
Commons, FY 1976 at UM/Amherst (Doc. T75-130) . Dr. Gage gave an 
overview of the matter, explaining that the campus's 52 dormitories 
were an important resource, in part because they provided a place 
to live for students who would otherwise not be able to find 
accommodations in the town, and in part because of what he describee 
as the educational function they carry out. A social problem 
currently encountered was a change in students' attitudes toward 
the halls — they had been built at a time when most students wished 
to live in them, whereas this was no longer necessarily so. 

The issue, said Dr. Gage, was complicated by fiscal 
problems. The residence halls were costly to build, they have 
high personnel costs, and they require costly programming. He 
informed the Committee that in March 1974 a study had begun in an 
effort to determine a long-range solution. The study had recom- 
mended a voluntary system which, it was believed, would allow the 
residence halls to be operated soundly as had been done at other 
universities . 

Dr. Gage added, however, that the proposal had been 
arrived at too late to implement for the 1975-76 academic year, 
with the result that the campus felt compelled to offer mandatory 
residence policy as an interim measure for one year to enable 
the University to meet its fiscal obligations. He added that 
explorations must take place to revise the policy before the 
year ends. 

In the discussion which followed, several Trustees 
asked for specific alternatives which might be explored for manage- 
ment of the residence halls. Possibilities mentioned were 
cooperative management for certain dormitories, subsidy or lower- 
cost campus housing for lower-income students, and state funding. 
President Wood stressed the importance of the temporary nature of 
the proposal, and said a comprehensive program was essential for 
the future. Upon a motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, 
effective the fall semester 1975, for one 
year, all full-time undergraduate students 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

(enrolled for twelve semester credits or more) on 
the Amherst campus be required to live in on-campus 
residence halls during their freshman, sophomore, 
and junior years. Exemption from this requirement 
may be granted to the following: married students, 
veterans, students living in and commuting from 
the home of their parent (s) or guardians while 
in attendance at the University, and resident mem- 
bers of fraternities or sororities at the Amherst 
campus . 

Trustee O'Keefe cast a negative vote. 

A similar proposal had been introduced to establish 
mandatory use of dining commons for the same groups of students and 
with the same exceptions. Upon motion made and seconded, a vote 
was taken, and the motion was defeated. 

The next item on the agenda was the proposed FY 1976 Fee- 
Based Budget for UM/Amherst (Doc. T75-121) . The Chairman explained 
that the purpose of the discussion was for members of the Student 
Affairs Committee to hear information on the fee-based budgets, 
not to take any action. Associate Vice President Keith asked a 
number of questions of Dr. Gage, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs 
among them an explanation of the fees proposed for Day Care Services 
and explanations of two legal services requests; (1) additional 
funds for the Legal Services Office with the provision that staff 
could represent students in criminal cases and in suits against the 
University, and (2) a request for additional legal counsel for the 
Student Organizing Project. 

In the Legal Services Office matter, Vice Chancellor Gage 
indicated the belief that there were serious unresolved questions 
about the purpose for which legal staff could be employed. It is 
necessary, he said, to explore the campus's capacity to represent 
students against the University. 

Counsel Searson indicated that there were serious legal 
doubts as to whether the Board of Trustees could authorize the 
expenditure of University funds in suits against the University. 
He said it might be necessary to get an opinion from the Attorney 
General's Office before the Board could properly take a position 
on the matter one way or the other. 



4 5 99 

Stu. Affairs 
5-20-75 

UM/Amherst — 

Residence Halls 

and Dining 

Commons 

(Doc. T75-130) 



UM/Amherst — 
FY 1976 Fee- 
Based Budget 
(Doc. T75-121) 



' 



Trustee O'Keefe offered a motion with respect to this 



matter: 



MOVED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 

Amherst Campus's Fee-Based budget for FY 1976 be 
passed with no restrictions which preclude the 
Student Legal Services Office from representing 
students in criminal matters or in litigation 
against the University. 



4 6 00 



Stu. Affairs 
5-20-75 

UM/Amherst — 
FY 1976 Fee- 
Based Budget 
(Doc. T75-121) 

COMMITTEE 



UM/Boston — 
Proposed FY 
1976 Fee 
Increases 
(Doc. T75-132) 



Day Care Reports 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



With respect to this proposed motion, the Chairman again 
pointed out that there was serious question as to whether it would 
be proper for the Student Affairs Committee to recommend that the 
Board of Trustees take a position on something the legality of 
which was in doubt. 

Following further discussion, Chairman Shaler again 
pointed out that the Committee was merely hearing a discussion of 
the fee-based budgets for its own information, and was not prepared 
to take any actions on the matter. He informed Trustee O'Keefe 
that the substance of the budgets would be discussed and acted 
upon by a joint meeting of the Committees on Budget and Finance 
on May 27. In view of this, and there being no second to the 
motion, Trustee O'Keefe did not ask for action by the Committee. 

It was also observed that the issue of policy as regards 
the proper use of funds by the Legal Services Office was separate 
from the issue of allocation of funds for that office. 

Chairman Shaler next asked Vice Chancellor Tubbs to 
speak to the Proposed FY 1976 Fee Increases on the Boston campus 
(Doc. T75-132) . Mr. Tubbs described and explained the proposals. 
Amid discussion of the specific recommendations, President Wood 
asked whether they had the approval of the University Assembly. 
Mr. Tubbs replied that they had the approval of the Assembly 
Steering Committee. President Wood remarked that these matters 
should have the comments of the full Assembly before they are 
brought before the Finance and Budget Committees. 

Chairman Shaler turned next to reports from the Amherst 
and Boston campuses on Day Care Services. The initial discussion 
dealt with matters of licensing and the need for liability 
waivers. It was observed by the President and others that day care 
centers must prerequire the signing of such waivers. 

One student present stated her belief that day care 
services on the Amherst campus had not been given a sufficiently 
high priority by the administration. She said that two of the 
day care centers would have to vacate space provided by the Univer- 
sity by June 1, and the University had made no effort to find new 
space. Mr. Preston pointed out in this connection that the two 
centers themselves had originally said they did not need University 
help in finding space, and in fact had not joined the University 
system until December 1974. 

Mr. Gulko observed that the University is in a difficult 
position in making budgets because of limited fiscal resources. 
It is necessary, he said, to make priority decisions about all 
enterprises, including day care. It was also pointed out that 
this further complicates the problem of allocation decisions. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Ms. Stack said that day care should have extremely high 
priority, because for many students it is essential to their 
attending the University at all. 

Mr. Keith suggested that the Amherst campus keep the 
Committee up-to-date on the fate of the two day care centers whose 
relocation was in doubt. Dr. Gage agreed, and added that he did 
not believe the problems of day care could be resolved easily or 
soon. 

The last item on the agenda was Reports on Counseling and 
Support Services at UM/Amherst . Chairman Shaler stated for the 
record that a request for information on this matter had been 
addressed to the Boston campus, but the campus had neither responded 
nor acknowledged the request. He said he hoped that the informa- 
tion would be supplied in advance of the Committee's next meeting, 
so that it may be properly studied. 

Speaking of the Amherst report, Mr. Preston praised the 
summary which Mr. Keith's office had prepared, and said he would 
not rehash its contents, but instead answer questions and indicate 
problem areas which still exist in connection with counseling and 
support services. Several of these areas, he said, had been 
touched on earlier in the meeting or in earlier meetings: day care 
problems, fiscal and philosophical problems in the residential life 
system, and problems in married students housing. Other problems, 
he said, were: (1) coordination of counseling services, which had 
not yet been satisfactorily achieved; (2) Affirmative Action, which 
had been a successful effort on the whole, although less so in the 
area of classified staff; and (3) the Office of Commuter Affairs, 
which he said should be reappraised in light of the lack of 
resources to support it adequately. 

Trustee O'Keefe praised the Office of Commuter Affairs, 
and spoke out strongly against its termination. He said the office 
was not costly, was meeting the needs of the 52 percent of the 
students at Amherst who are commuters, and had been terminated 
without consultation with the commuter students. 

Both Dr. Gage and Mr. Preston said the issue of the 
Commuter Services Office was not closed, and that Helen Hill, 
director of the office, was still on the job pending a resolution 
of the issue. 

Chairman Shaler said he had been pleased when the Office 
of Commuter Affairs had been established, because it had been 
apparent to him as a result of the Committee's inquiries into the 
whole counseling system over the past several years that commuter 
students had not been receiving the kind of attention that they 
should receive. He said he hoped that dialogue on the campus would 
continue on this matter. 



y 



4601 

Stu. Affairs 
5-20-75 

Day Care Reports J 



i rrr:, vi??<v: 



4602 

Stu. Affairs 
5-20-75 

UM/Amherst — 
Married Students 
Housing 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Chairman also asked for an update on the proposal of 
married students for a rent rollback on married students housing. 
Dr. Gage replied that the administration had met extensively with 
the married students, and that the students had viewed the effort 
to develop a cooperative system of management as the top priority. 

He reported that the students had agreed to drop the 
request for a rent rollback if the University would vigorously 
pursue the possibility of developing a cooperative system of 
managing married students' housing by September 1975. He added 
that a joint study group representing both the University and the 
married students was conducting a feasibility study and would have 
a report on the feasibility of the proposal. 

Trustee O'Keefe offered the following motion: 

MOVED : To recommend to the UMass, Amherst Administra- 
tion the immediate reinstatement of the Office 
of Commuter Affairs and its director, Dr. Helen 
Hill (barring an adverse performance report 
of office/personnel functions subject to review). 
To further resolve that all possible avenues be 
utilized to provide the Off-Campus Housing 
Office with program support money as originally 
promised. 

The Chairman expressed the view that it would be improper 
for the Committee to take such an action without sufficient 
review on the Amherst campus first. Trustee O'Keefe asked if the 
motion would be in order as an item of agenda for the Committee's 
next meeting, and the Chairman indicated it would. The motion 
was not seconded, and no vote was taken. 

There was no further business to come before the 
Committee, and the meeting was adjourned at 4:15 p.m. 



(^SladysOKeith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



r 



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4603 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 



I 



May 27, 1975; 10:00 a.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Gordon, President 
Wood; Trustees O'Keefe, Rothenburger , Weldon; Secretary 
Hardy, Treasurer Johnson, Ms. Eichel, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Mr. Edelman, Vice President 
for University Policy; Mr. Gartenberg, Budget Director; 
Mr. Cass, Director of the Institute for Labor Affairs; 
Mr. Brand, Associate Treasurer; Mr. O'Leary, Assistant 
Counsel 

UM/Amherst : Mr. Gulko, Budget Director; Prof. Wilkinson, 
Faculty Representative; Ms. Stack, Graduate Student 
Representative 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Hamilton, Vice 
Chancellor for Administration and Finance; Mr. Baxter, 
Budget Director 

UM/Worcester : Dr. Butcher, Acting Dean of the Medical 
School; Mr. Stockwell, Associate Dean for Administrative 
Affairs and Hospital Director; Dr. Wheeler, Chief of 
Surgery; Mr. Cathey, Controller; Mr. Fellner, Assistant 
Controller; Dr. Regan, Chairman, Department of 
Ophthalmology 

Invited Guests : Mr. John Wood, of Standish, Ayer & Wood, 
Investment Consultants; Mr. Joseph Albert, Insurance 
Consultant; Mr. Wallace Ackley and Mr. Eugene Freedman, 
of Coopers & Lybrand, Auditors 

Other Guests : Lucia Bruno, John Hite, Dorothy Muller, 
Henry Ragin, James Starr, all from the Amherst campus 



The meeting was called to order at 10:30 a.m. by Chairman 
Gordon. The Chairman informed those present that due to the lack 
of a quorum, the items on the agenda would be discussed, but all 
votes would be deferred until June 4, at which time the Committee 
would meet to take formal action on the various agenda items. 



4 6 04 



Finance Comm. 
5-27-75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Introduction 
of New Trustees 



COMMITTEE 

Report of 

Investment 

Counsel 



General 
Liability 
Coverage — 
Status Report 



Chairman Gordon then introduced Prof. Wilkinson, 
Alternate Faculty Representative from the UM/Amherst Faculty 
Senate, and welcomed him and the two new student Trustees, John 
O'Keefe and Cary Rothenburger , to the meeting. 

The Chairman next asked Mr. John Wood, of Standish, Ayer 
& Wood, to report on the status of the University's investment 
portfolio. Mr. Wood reviewed briefly the market situation and 
stated that he recommended selling the RCA and Holiday Inns stocks 
now held by the University and using the proceeds to buy stock in 
Johnson & Johnson and Eli Lilly pharmaceutical companies. He 
said that although the Holiday Inns stock is increasing in value, 
its recovery is slow. The current consumer market has also hurt 
the television industry. He stated his belief that the University 
should invest in pharmaceutical companies on a long-term basis. 

Treasurer Johnson informed the Committee that the 
Johnson & Johnson stock had been a gift to the University and was 
currently being held in trust. The purpose of this transaction, 
he said, would be to buy this stock from the Trust and make it a 
part of the University investment portfolio. The Lilly stock, 
he said, would be a new account. Mr. Wood added that in the 
current market short-term bonds were competitive with stocks. 
Mr. Wood called the attention of the Committee to his proposal 
for an investment policy for the University, which he said he 
expected the Committee might wish to discuss at a later meeting. 
It was agreed that this matter would be addressed by the Committee 
at its June 18 meeting. 

Chairman Gordon next turned the discussion to matters 
of the general liability and malpractice insurance coverage under 
consideration by the Committee, and asked Mr. Joseph Albert, 
Insurance Consultant, to speak to these topics. Mr. Albert briefly 
reviewed the status of negotiations for the various coverages. He 
said that a binder had been placed on the General Liability Insur- 
ance coverage as of April 1, and that the various policies were 
currently being reviewed by the University Counsel. He indicated 
that he had been queried as to the possibility and cost of 
protection for the Trustees from liability for prior acts and 
asked the Committee for direction as to how he should proceed in 
this regard. 

At the request of President Wood, Assistant Counsel 
O'Leary explained the doctrine of "sovereign immunity" and its 
impact in the area of liability insurance. He stated that the 
doctrine precludes suits in tort against the University "as an 
institution" and against the Board of Trustees as a "statutory 
entity." However, the doctrine does not prevent suits seeking to 
impose personal liability on individual members of the Board or 
individual employees of the University. He noted that the Trustees 
pursuant to Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 15, section 19B 
were entitled to indemnification for any liability incurred, 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

provided the statutory conditions were met. He added that this 
statute was limited to Trustees and would not be available to 
employees of the University. He further advised the Committee 
that a body of "case law" had been developed to the effect that an 
officer of the Commonwealth in the performance of his or her official 
acts is only liable for his or her own active misfeasance as opposed 
to simple negligence and that liability cannot be imposed through 
the doctrine of respondeat superior . 

Lastly, Counsel O'Leary informed the Committee that the 
Legislature was considering a bill which, if enacted, would abolish 
the doctrine of soverign immunity, but establish a statutory 
maximum of $20,000 on liability. Trustee Weldon said that a 
"charitable immunity" statute currently limits the amount of liabil- 
ity for religious and other charitable organizations. After fur- 
ther discussion with regard to the amount of exposure and the cost 
for including "prior acts" in the general liability insurance 
coverage, Chairman Gordon asked Committee members to communicate 
their reactions to this particular coverage to the Secretary. 

Mr. Albert said that there are still some types of 
coverage under the general liability policy which have not been 
fully resolved. Two of these areas are coverage involving vessels 
and involving professional liability. These may be included as 
addenda to the basic policy at a later date. Chairman Gordon 
asked Mr. Albert when he expected that all endorsements on the 
general liability insurance would be completed, to which Mr. Albert 
responded that he expected to have these by the end of June. 

Mr. Albert then turned to the problem of malpractice 
insurance for personnel at the UM/Worcester Medical School and 
Teaching Hospital other than physicians, who currently have indiv- 
idual insurance coverage. Mr. Albert said that this type of insur- 
ance is increasingly difficult to obtain. He asked for an opinion 
from University Counsel as to whether the Foley bill, which affords 
protection to licensed physicians and hospitals, could be inter- 
preted to include state hospitals. Mr. O'Leary replied that the 
proposed bill has value on the issue but that he doubted it would 
cover state institutions. At the request of the President, Mr. 
Cass reported on the current status of this bill. He stated that 
the bill was currently nearing final form and that it would be 
difficult at this stage to make amendments to it. The Chairman 
requested Counsel, after discussion with Mr. Cass, to write a 
legal opinion as to whether the Foley bill was applicable to state 
hospitals and if the protection afforded by the bill would cover 
personnel other than physicians and residents, such as students, 
interns and other affiliated categories of employment. 

Considerable discussion ensued as to the various options 
open to University personnel at different professional levels. Mr. 
Albert said that UM/Worcester personnel could be added to the 



4605 



Finance Comm. 
5-27-75 

General Liabilit 1 
Coverage — 
Status Report 



UM/Worcester — 
Malpractice 
Insurance 
Coverage, Status 
Report 



4606 

Finance Comm. 
5-27-75 

UM/Worc ester — 
Malpractice 
Insurance 
Coverage, Status 
Report committee 



Executive 
Session 



UM/Worcester — 
Physicians' Fee 
Schedules 
(Doc. T75-138) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

general liability coverage for a relatively small additional cost. 
Chairman Gordon asked Dr. Butcher, Acting Dean of the Medical 
School, how soon malpractice coverage would be required, to which 
Dr. Butcher replied that the need was immediate since students 
were currently seeing patients. Although the greatest need would 
occur at the time of the opening of the hospital, he said, the 
out-patient clinic was currently in operation. Mr. Edelman, Vice 
President for University Policy, said that under the proposed 
Group Practice regulations, a provision is included to reimburse 
premium costs to individual physicians from the group practice 
plan until such time as a group policy is available. 

Chairman Gordon asked if it would make sense to look to 
the Foley bill for coverage for physicians, to ask Mr. Albert to 
look into the possibility of obtaining malpractice insurance for 
paramedicals and other hospital personnel and to see if the pro- 
fessional staff could be included under the hospital policy. Mr. 
Albert said that he would add the UM/Worcester personnel to the 
general liability insurance coverage, investigate alternatives that 
may be available for malpractice coverage for employees other than 
physicians, with the expectation that students would be covered 
under the Foley bill. This would leave the Trustees without 
coverage for malpractice suits. Chairman Gordon said he hoped it 
would be possible to include the Trustees under the malpractice 
coverage. 

At the request of Trustee Weldon, Dr. Butcher and Dr. 
Wheeler explained the difference in premium costs for different 
specialties and for different physicians. At the conclusion of 
this discussion, it was agreed that Mr. Albert would present a 
status report on June 18 with regard to his further exploration 
of the various malpractice insurance options. 



At 11:50 



a.m. it was moved, seconded and 



VOTED : To go into Executive Session for the purpose 
of hearing a progress report from the repre- 
sentatives of Coopers & Lybrand, who are 
currently working on the evaluation of Univer- 
sity grant and contract administration and 
the audit of the School of Education. 

At 12:30 p.m. the executive session concluded and 
Chairman Gordon turned to the next item on the agenda, Physicians ' 
Fee Schedules — UM/Worcester (Doc. T75-138) . At the request of 
the Chairman, Dr. Regan, Chairman of the Department of Ophthalmology, 
explained briefly how the fees had been determined. The fees, 
he said, were based on regional or national norms wherever possible 
The schedule included rates which were comparable to rates charged 
by other hospitals and physicians in the Worcester area. Dr. 
Wheeler added that these rates are reviewed by the third-party 
payers. The patients would normally be billed for any difference 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

between the fee charged and the amount paid by the third-party payer. 
However, where patients could not afford to pay the difference, 
there would be a provision for an abatement in the rate. Dr. Regan 
said that an effort had been made to keep the rates within the 
limits of rates charged by other institutions and physicians in the 
area, especially for the beginning of operation of the hospital, and 
that rates were set so as not to take patients away from other 
institutions. 

The Chairman asked if the fee schedule had been reviewed 
by the appropriate administrative officers, to which Vice President 
Edelman said that it had. He listed six categories of out-patient 
services outlined in the document, adding that the document had 
been discussed with the office of the Commissioner of Public Health 
and that the Commissioner had found the rates satisfactory. Mr. 
Stockwell, Director of the Hospital, said that many of the services 
to be provided are not available elsewhere in the Worcester area. 



Chairman Gordon int 
addenda to Rates for Patient 



roduced the next agenda item, the 
Care and Services — UM/Worcester , as 



outlined in Addendum to Doc. T75-070 (Doc. T75-133) . At the request 



of the Chairman, Mr. Fellner, 
explained that the Addendum c 
approved by the Board of Trus 
additional fees which were no 
Mr. Fellner said that the rat 
these proposed rates and that 
appropriate staff persons in 



Assistant Controller, UM/Worcester, 
overed increases in the rate schedule 
tees as Doc. T75-050 and also included 
t contained in the original document, 
e setting commission was aware of 

they had also been reviewed by the 
the President's Office. 



Chairman Gordon asked Treasurer Johnson to explain the 
next agenda item, Authorization of Direct Scheduling of Vendor 
Payments — UM/Worcester , and the reason for this request. Mr. Johnson 
said that this is merely a means of simplifying paper work and 
expediting payment to vendors, and that a similar procedure had 
previously been authorized by the Trustees for the UM/Boston campus. 

The next item on the agenda, the establishment of the 
William H. Ross Memorial Fund (Doc. T75-139) , was reviewed briefly 
by Mr. Robert Brand, Associate Treasurer, who explained that Mr. 
Ross had been a distinguished member of the UM/Amherst faculty. 
The purpose of the endowment fund is to make available an annual 
award of $500 from the income earned from the fund during the 
preceding fiscal year to a junior or senior enrolled as a full-time 
student at UM/Amherst. Applicants for the award must fulfill the 
requirements outlined in the document, which include the preparation 
of a paper on the topic, "What I Plan on Doing After Graduation 
That Will Help Society as a Whole." Mr. Gulko asked for a clarifica- 
tion of the meaning of the words "major program" in the proposed 
vote. It was agreed that the wording should be amended to read 
"program major." 



4607 

Finance Comm. 
5-27-75 

UM/Worcester — 
Physicians' Fee 
Schedules 
(Doc. T75-138) 



UM/Worcester — 
Addendum to Doc. 
T75-050, Rates 
for Patient Care 
and Services 
(Doc. T75-133) 



UM/Worcester — 
Authorization of 
Direct Schedul- 
ing of Vendor 
Payments 



Establishment of 
William H. Ross 
Memorial Fund 
(Doc. T75-139) 



4 6 08 

Finance Comm. 
5-27-75 

Revocation of 
Delegation of 
Authority 

COMMITTEE 



UM/Amherst — 
Authorization to 
Sign Rental 
Agreement for 
Apartment Facilii 
ties in NYC for 
OUTREACH Program 



University of . 

Massachusetts 

"Zero Balance" 

Advance Payroll 

System 

(Doc. T75-140) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Gordon asked Treasurer Johnson to speak to the 
next item on the agenda, relating to the revocation of the dele- 
gation of authority to Donald W. Cadigan to sign certain documents 
for the University. Treasurer Johnson said that this vote was 
being proposed as a result of a written request from Mr. Cadigan, 
who indicated that the increasing volume of business in his office 
has led him to make this request to be relieved of this particular 
responsibility. It was the sense of the meeting that Mr. Cadigan' s 
request should be honored by the Committee. 

At the request of Chairman Gordon, Mr. Gulko spoke 
briefly to the item on the agenda with regard to authorization of 
a rental agreement in New York City for the UM/Amherst OUTREACH 
Program. This, he said, was the renewal of an authorization 
approved by the Board of Trustees in November, 1974, and was 
necessary to obtain housing for students in the administrative 
intern program for the 1975-76 academic year. There were no state 
funds involved, he said, since the students pay for the apartment 
facilities . 

Chairman Gordon asked Treasurer Johnson to review 
briefly the final item on the agenda, the implementation of the 
new University of Massachusetts "Zero Balance" Advance Payroll 
System (Doc. T75-140) . Mr. Johnson said that this procedure was 
being initiated in order to comply with the new state regulations 
which would become effective on July 1, 1975. He indicated that 
although, in some cases, the new system might prove inconvenient 
to some employees, an attempt had been made to keep these incon- 
veniences minimal. Since the payroll account for the University 
would now be handled by the New England Merchants Bank, he said, 
Amherst and other employees who so desired could have their pay- 
checks deposited by the New England Merchants Bank directly into 
a bank of their choice. 

There being no further business before the Committee, 
the meeting adjourned at 1:05 p.m. 



P_adys0 Keith Hardy 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON THE BUDGET 

May 27, 1975; 12:30 p.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Carlson; Trustees 
Gordon, O'Keefe, Rothenburger , Troy; Treasurer Johnson; 
Secretary Hardy; Ms. Judd, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

UM/Amherst : Mr. Solomon, Deputy Director of Budgeting 
and Institutional Studies; Professor Wilkinson, Faculty 
Representative; Ms. Stack, Graduate Student Representative 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Hamilton, Vice Chan- 
cellor for Administration and Finance; Mr. Baxter, 
Budget Director; Professor Gagnon, Faculty Representative 

Office of the President : Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for 
Planning; Mr. Gartenberg, Budget Director 

Guests : Mr. James Starr, Student Legal Services Office, 
UM/Amherst; Ms. Dorothy Bellows, Graduate Student Senate, 
and Mr. Henry Ragin, Student Senate 



The meeting was called to order at 12:40 p.m. 

The first item on the agenda was the Year-End Adjustments 
to FY 75 Operating Budget (Doc. T75-134) . Chairman Carlson asked 



I 



Mr. Gartenberg to comment on the fund transfers for the three 
campuses. Mr. Gartenberg said that these were basically end-of-the 
year adjustments. In answer to a question by Trustee Troy regarding 
the further adjustments anticipated, Mr. Gartenberg said that the 
final allocation from the State Fuel reserve for UM/Amherst had come 
in after the document for the Committee was prepared and that some 
would require revision. Mr. Solomon outlined the revisions, saying 
that there were some differences; referring specifically to an amount 
of $85,000, he said that the deficiency was awarded after the figures 
were submitted and that this sum was to be used for the state funded 
share of work-study programs, telephone and postage. Chairman Carlson 
asked for an explanation of the six figures which had been changed. 
Mr. Solomon reviewed these for the Committee in more detail. 

After noting that it would not be possible for the 
Committee to vote at this time since a quorum was not present, 



4 609 



Year-End Adjust- 
ments to FY 75 
Operating Budget 
(Doc. T75-134) 



4 610 



Budget Comm. 
5-27-75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



FY 76 Continuing Chairman Carlson turned to the next agenda item, FY 76 Continuing 
Resolution Resolution (Doc. T75-135) . Because of delays with regard to the 
(Doc 



T75-135) 



COMMITTEE 



Amendments to 
Capital Outlay 
Request 
(Doc. T75-137) 



state budget, a vote was necessary to authorize the expenditure of 
funds as of July 1 pending passage of the final state budget and 
pending presentation of the FY 1976 Operating Budget. 

The last agenda item for discussion was the Amendments 
to Capital Outlay Request (Doc. T75-137) . Mr. Hamilton said that 
since the shuttle bus system was going to continue for quite some 
time, it made sense at this time to acquire the land currently 
leased from Gulf Oil. The station now on the lot would continue to 
operate. After a question from Trustee Troy, it was pointed out 
that the $250,000 requested would include acquisition and develop- 
ment of the projected terminal facilities. 

Professor Gagnon then asked what would be the level at 
which the University was authorized to spend under the Continuing 
Resolution. Mr. Gartenberg replied that that would depend upon 
the wording of the statute authorizing spending beyond July 1. 

The meeting adjourned at 1:00 p.m. and reconvened at 
3:10 p.m. at which time a quorum was present. The motions were 
made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees approval of 
the State fund transfers proposed by the Amherst, 
Boston and Worcester campuses as set forth in 
Doc. T75-134. 

VOTED : That the President be authorized to approve the 
expenditure of State and nonstate funds by the 
three campuses, the Office of the President, and 
the Institute for Governmental Services from 
July 1, 1975, until such time as the Board of 
Trustees adopts the Operating Budget for FY 1976. 

The approval of expenditure of State funds shall 
be consistent with the appropriate State statutes 
governing the FY 1976 appropriation. 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees approval 
of amendments to the FY76 Capital Outlay 
Request as set forth in Doc. T75-137. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:15 p.m. 






$ladys(/Keith Hardy U 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF JOINT MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEES 
ON THE BUDGET AND FINANCE 



I 



May 27, 1975; 1:00 p.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairmen Carlson and Gordon; 
Trustees O'Keefe, Rothenburger , Shaler, Troy, Weldon; 
Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Mr. Brand, Associate 
Treasurer; Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice President 
for Academic Affairs; Mr. Gartenberg, Budget Director; 
Mr. Kaplan, Assistant Vice President for Organization and 
Management; Mr. Keith, Associate Vice President for 
University Policy; Mr. O'Leary, Assistant Counsel 

UM/ Amherst : Dr. Gage, Vice Chancellor for Student 
Affairs; Mr. Dean, Director of Residential Life; Mr. 
Gulko, Budget Director; Ms. Stack, Graduate Student Repre- 
sentative; Professor Wilkinson, Faculty Representative 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Hamilton, Vice Chan- 
cellor for Administration and Finance; Mr. Baxter, 
Director of Budget and Control; Professor Gagnon, Faculty 
Representative 

Guests : Dorothy Bellows, Jack Margosian, Dorothy L. 
Muller, Joanne Pearlman, Henry Ragin, James Starr, from 
the Amherst campus 



The meeting was called to order at 1:10 p.m. Before pro- 
ceeding to the formal agenda, Trustee Carlson called upon Mr. 
Gartenberg to report action taken on the University's FY 1976 budget 
request. Mr. Gartenberg reported that Secretary Parks had called 
for a hearing to take place on May 27 at which he would announce his 
budget proposals for the University, which totalled $90 million. 
Mr. Gartenberg observed that this figure represented a significant 
reduction of current budget levels, and he said its implications 
would have to be carefully reviewed over the next several weeks. 

The first item on the formal agenda was a group of fee 



4611 



■; 1JMOS 



4612 



Budget & Finance 
5-27-75 

UM/Amherst — 
FY 1976 Fee- 
Based Budget 
(Doc. T75-121) 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

changes contained in FY 1976 Fee-Based Budget for the Amherst campus 
(Doc. T75-121) . Trustee Carlson, who chaired the joint meeting, 
pointed out to the Committees that the purpose of the meeting was 
not to consider the budget, an action which would take place later 
in the year, but merely to consider the fee changes proposed there- 
in. He called upon Trustee Shaler, Chairman of the Trustee 
Committee on Student Affairs, to report that Committee's delibera- 
tions of the proposals which had taken place at its May 20 meeting. 

Trustee Shaler reported considerable discussion of the 
proposals, most of which had centered on the requested increase in 
the allocation to the Legal Services Office. He said the issue 
under discussion had been the legality of using University funds 
for defending students in criminal actions or in suits against the 
University. Mr. Searson had indicated that an opinion from the 
state Attorney General might be needed to resolve this question. 
Trustee Shaler asked the two student Trustees present if they 
wished to add to his report, and they indicated satisfaction with 
his report. 

Trustee Gordon turned next to the document itself, 
explaining that it contained sixteen proposed votes. Since the 
meeting did not have a quorum, the votes taken would serve to 
express the sense of the meeting, and a special meeting to take 
place before the meeting of the full Board of Trustees on June 4 
would make formal recommendations to the Board. 

The first matter was a set of proposed increases in 
residence hall fees. A short discussion included questions from 
Trustee Carlson about the need for, and size of, the undesignated 
reserves. Mr. Gulko said that it was necessary to have a 
sufficient reserve in case of an unexpected catastrophe, such as 
a fire in a residence hall. After further brief discussion, it 
was voted informally to approve the proposed increases. Trustee 
O'Keefe and Trustee Rothenburger were opposed. 

The next item was a proposed loan of $110,000 to the 
Boarding Hall Trust Fund from the Student Housing Room Deposit. 
Mr. Gulko explained that such loans were standard procedure for 
this point in the fiscal year and that they had always been repaid 
with interest. This was also informally voted. 

Fee increases were then proposed for certain dining 
facilities. It was explained by campus representatives that the 
increases would enable the facilities to remain open longer, and 
would cover labor and food increases. The Committees voted 
informally to recommend the increases to the Board of Trustees. 

Trustee Gordon asked if consideration had ever been given 
to contracting with a private food service firm to service the 
dining halls. Mr. Dean replied that such inquiries had been made, 
but that the firms asked preferred to take an advisory role rather 



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COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

than take over the service altogether. Mr. Gulko added that such an 
arrangement would be the largest food service contract in the 
country. 

Trustee Gordon asked if such an arrangement could be tried 
out on one or two residence halls, and Dr. Gage replied that it 
might be possible, but that the overall management system of the 
dining halls would make it impracticable to operate some on an 
independent, and some on a contract, basis. Trustee Gordon asked 
that the campus explore the feasibility of trying out such a service 
on selected dining halls, and report the results of the investigation 
to the Finance Committee. Dr. Gage agreed. 

Because the UM/Boston Proposed FY 1976 Fee Increases (Doc. 
T75-132) entailed only three fees, Trustee Carlson asked that it 
be considered next. Chancellor Golino informed the Committee that 
these increases had been approved by the University Assembly. It 
was informally voted by the Committees to recommend this proposal 
to the Board of Trustees. 

Returning to consideration of the Amherst fees, the 
Committees considered summer conference rates for certain residence 
halls. These proposed temporary decreases were informally approved 
by the Committees, to be voted upon formally at the June 4 special 
meeting. 

Trustee Gordon asked about the review process which the 
Amherst proposals had undergone on the campus. The process had 
entailed reviews by different groups for different votes, Mr. Gulko 
said, and at the chair's request listed the approvals which had 
taken place for each proposed fee change. Mr. Gartenberg remarked 
that the Board of Trustees must vote on certain student-related 
fees at the June meeting for billing to take place during July. 

Trustee O'Keefe said that adequate student review of 
certain of the proposals had not taken place for several reasons. 
He said the students had felt that administrative economies could 
have made the residence hall fee increases unnecessary. Discussion 
continued briefly about the campus review process, during which 
Trustee Carlson pointed out that the Committees must vote on these 
proposals whether campus-level review has been adequate or not, in 
view of Mr. Gartenberg 's earlier statement. 

The Committees turned to proposed fee increases for the 
Campus Center Garage. It was explained, in answer to a question, 
that the University of Massachusetts Building Authority would be 
consulted on the changes, and the Committees voted informally to 
approve them subject to this consultation. 

The next matter was changes in fees for the six University 
day care centers. Dr. Gage again stated that the users of the 
centers were not in opposition to the increases, and it was 



4613 

Budget & Finance 
5-27-75 

UM/ Amherst — 
FY 1976 Fee- 
Based Budget 
(Doc. T75-121) 



UM/Boston — 
Proposed FY 1976 
Fee Increases 
(Doc. T75-132) 



4 614 



Budget & Finance 
5-27-75 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

informally voted to recommend them to the Board. 

The Committees turned to three matters: an increase in 
the graduate program fee, an increase in the graduate student tax, 
and a new fee schedule for University Health Services in the area 
of eye examinations and dental services. It was pointed out to the 
Committees that the graduate student tax was a recommendation of 
the Graduate Student Senate. Each of the proposed fee changes were 
informally voted subject to final recommendation at the special 
meeting. 

Treasurer Johnson called attention to the trust funds 
contemplated for horseback riding, the composition service, the 
administrative data processing system, and the management systems. 
He said he did not believe these trust funds had been given 
adequate review and clearance by his office, and he questioned the 
legality of setting fees before the trust funds are established. 
He suggested that these votes be deferred. 

Mr. Gartenberg said he and Mr. Searson also had outstand- 
ing questions on this issue, and both Trustees Carlson and Gordon 
expressed concern that the Trustees were being asked to approve 
fee increases when unresolved legal and fiscal issues remained. 

Each of these proposed votes was deferred for vote prior 
to the Board meeting on June 4, subject to resolution of legal and 
fiscal issues. 

The Committees next turned to proposed fee changes for 
international programs, for telephone service in the residence 
halls, and for student activities of the Stockbridge School of 
Agriculture. It was pointed out that the change in the Stockbridge 
fees and taxes was at the initiation of the Stockbridge Student 
Senate. Each of these proposals was informally voted. 

Trustee Gordon addressed the students present, several of 
whom were members of the Amherst Student Government Association. 
He pointed out to them the difficulties of the Trustees in having 
to vote on proposals at the last possible minute when questions 
remain about whether there has been adequate student review of 
proposals which will affect them. He said he hoped the students 
could restructure the calendar of student government business so 
that it can take the Trustees' time constraints into account. 
Nobody likes higher fees, he said, but he said he hoped in the 
future that the students will review fee changes carefully and 
early and, if they are found to be unsatisfactory, to recommend 
viable alternatives. 

Trustee O'Keefe and Ms. Stack agreed with this need, and 
both discussed efforts underway to reorganize the student govern- 
ment structure. Trustee Gordon also asked that, in the future, 
proposals with legal implications be cleared through legal counsel 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



before they are brought to the Trustees. 

Mr. O'Leary spoke briefly to clarify Mr. Searson's concern 
about the proposed allocation to the Legal Services Office. Mr. 
Searson's concern, he said, was not about the existence of the 
office or the number of attorneys it employs, but rather about the 
legal issue of how those attorneys could be employed. 

There was no further business to come before the Committees 
and the meeting was adjourned at 3:10 p.m. 



Gladys Keith Hardy 



4615 



Budget & Finance 
5-27-75 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



I 



I 



4616 



COMMITTEE 



University En- 
dowment Fund 
Portfolio — Pro- 
posed Changes 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

June 4, 1975; 9:00 a.m. 

Room 207, College II, Harbor Campus 
University of Massachusetts/Boston 
Boston, Massachusetts 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Gordon, Trustees 

Carlson, Croce, Robertson, Rothenburger , Rowland, Weldon; 
Treasurer Johnson; Ms. Eichel, recorder 

Office of the President : Mr. Searson, General Counsel; 
Mr. O'Leary, Assistant Counsel; Ms. Hanson, Assistant 
Budget Director; Mr. Lewis, Staff Assistant, Budget Office 

UM/Boston : Mr. Hamilton, Vice Chancellor for Adminis- 
tration and Finance; Mr. Baxter, Budget Director 

U M/Worcester : Mr. Fellner, Assistant Controller 

Guest: Tony Gailliard, Student, UM/Boston 



The meeting was called to order at 9:15 a.m. by Chairman 
Gordon. The Chairman said the agenda items had been discussed at 
the May 27 meeting of the Committee, but that since a quorum had 
not been present, no action had been taken. Therefore he had 
called this meeting, he said, to take formal action. 

The Chairman then asked for a vote on the proposed changes 
to the University investment portfolio as recommended by Standish, 
Ayer & Wood, investment counsel. In accordance with the vote of 
the Board of Trustees of June 30, 1966, empowering Kenneth W. 
Johnson, as Treasurer of the University of Massachusetts, to take 
certain actions relative to the endowment and trust funds of the 
University, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED: To authorize and empower Kenneth W. Johnson, 
Treasurer of the University of Massachusetts, 
to execute the following transactions: 

1. To sell the following securities: 



f 



i 



CO 



8 



1 



RCA 

Holiday Inns 



1,500 shares 
1,000 shares 



To purchase, with the proceeds from the 
sale of the RCA and Holiday Inns securi- 
ties, the following securities: 



Johnson & Johnson 
Eli Lilly 



100 shares 
400 shares 



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COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Chairman Gordon commented for the record on the discussion 
which had taken place at the May 27 meeting of the Committee con- 
cerning the University insurance program. He said that Mr. Joseph 
Albert, insurance consultant, had advised the Committee that a 
binder had been placed on the General Liability insurance coverage, 
but that he had not yet been successful in obtaining insurance for 
malpractice in connection with the UM/Worcester Medical School and 
Teaching Hospital. 

Treasurer Johnson informed the Committee that, since the 
last meeting, Mr. Albert had been able to extend the General 
Liability coverage to include UM/Worcester nonmedical employees 
and had indicated he did not think it would be difficult to obtain 
coverage for students and paramedical employees. 

Dr. Croce asked if the medical Trustees could help in 
obtaining malpractice insurance. Chairman Gordon replied that 
they might at a later date; at present he thought it wise to await 
the outcome of the Foley bill, which addressed this matter. 

Chairman Gordon then turned to the matter of Physicians ' 
Fee Schedule s — UM/Worcester (Doc. T75-138) and asked for action by 
the Committee. On motion made and seconded, it was 



VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 

and adopt the University of Massachusetts Medical 
Center professional charges of group practice 
plan members for patient services as set forth 
in Doc. T75-138. 

The Chairman then asked for action on the addenda to 
Rates for Patient Care and Services — UM/Worcester, as outlined in 
Addendum to Doc. T75-050 (Doc. T75-133) . On motion made and sec- 
onded, it was 

VOTED: To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the following categories of hospital charges: 
(1) Hospital Charges for Outpatient Clinic 
Visits, (2) Hospital Component of Ophthalmology 
rates, and (3) Walk- in visits to the Emergency 
Room, as set forth in Doc. T75-133, and to in- 
corporate same in Doc. T75-050, said amended 
document to be redesignated as Doc. T75-050A. 

The Chairman next called for a vote on the authorization 
of direct scheduling of vendor payments — UM/Worcester. On motion 
made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees authorize 
Dr. Reginald W. Butcher, John F. Stockwell, Robert 
L. Cathey and W. Clifford Fisher as signators on 
State Batch Transmittal Documents processed by 
the Medical School and Teaching Hospital to the 

State Comptroller. 



4617 



Finance 
6-4-75 



UM/ Wore ester — 
Physicians' Fee 
Schedules 
(Doc. T75-138) 



UM/Worcester — 
Addendum to 
Doc. 175^050 , 
| Rates for Patient 
Care and Services 
(Doc. T75-133) 



UM/Worcester<rr- 
Authorization of 
Direct Scheduling 
of Vendor Payment! 



4 618 



Finance 

6-4-75 



COMMITTEE 



Establishment of 



William H. Ross 
Memorial Fund 
(Doc. T75-139) 



Revocation of 
Delegation of 
Authority 



UM/Amherst — 
Authorization to 
Sign Rental 
Agreement for 
Apartment Facil- 
ities in New York 
City for OUT- 
REACH Program 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Gordon next asked the Committee to vote on the 
Establishment of the William H. Ross Memorial Fund (Doc. T75-139) , 
and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees establish 
the William H. Ross Memorial Fund as an endow- 
ment fund for the purpose of making an annual 
award (s) of $500.00 from the income earned during 
the preceding fiscal year to a junior or senior 
enrolled as a full-time student enrolled at the 
University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and such 
awards shall be for tuition, fees, and educational 
expenses; therefore, to be eligible a student 
must be in good academic standing, be registered 
in a program major, demonstrate financial need 
but not necessarily be a member of a minority 
group, and present a written paper on the topic, 
"What I Plan on Doing After Graduation That Will 
Help Society as a Whole." The recipient (s) shall 
be selected by a committee appointed by the Chan- 
cellor consisting of a member of the Physics 
Department and two faculty members from any other 
department, School, or College of the Amherst 
campus. An award to a junior shall automatically 
be continued for the senior year without requiring 
a new paper provided the student shows a continuing 
need for financial support and remains in good 
academic standing. 

The Chairman then asked for a vote with regard to Mr. 
Donald Cadigan's request for the revocation of his delegation of 
authority, and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees, in 
accordance with the request of Donald W. 
Cadigan dated May 12, 1975, rescind in its 
entirety the Trustee vote of April 26, 1971, 
authorizing Donald W. Cadigan to sign certain 
items for the University of Massachusetts. 

Chairman Gordon called next for a vote on the request 
for authorization of a rental agreement in New York City for the 
UM/Amherst OUTREACH Program, and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees authorize 
the Chancellor of the University of Massachusetts, 
Amherst, or his designee, to negotiate a rental 
agreement for apartment facilities in New York 
City, said agreement not to exceed the academic 
year ending May 31, 1976, for the purpose of 
housing approximately 14 interns from the 
University who will be administrative interns. 
Further, to recommend that the Treasurer of the 



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COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

University be empowered and authorized to execute 
a lease agreement for and in behalf of the Univer- 
sity in furtherance of said purpose upon success- 
ful completion of said negotiations. 

The Chairman then turned to the final item on the agenda 
requiring action, the Implementation of New State Payroll System , 
(Doc. T75-140) , and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees authorize 
the implementation of the "zero balance" advance 
payroll system in the New England Merchants National 
Bank, Boston, as described in Doc. T75-140. 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees designate, 
effective with the first weekly payroll for the 
fiscal year 1976 (July 1975) or as soon thereafter 
as is technically feasible, the New England Mer- 
chants National Bank, Boston, as the payroll dis- 
bursement bank for the University of Massachusetts; 
and that the Board of Trustees discontinue the 
payroll accounts in the State Street Bank and 
Trust Company, Boston, and the First National Bank 
of Amherst upon the clearance and reconciliation 
of outstanding checks drawn thereon. 

The Chairman announced that the next meeting of the Com- 
mittee would take place at 4:00 p.m. on June 18, emphasizing that 
it would be an important meeting and urging all members to try to 
arrange their schedules so that they could attend. 

There being no further business to come before the Com- 
mittee, the meeting was adjourned at 9:30 a.m. 



(Jladyfl Keith Hardy I 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4 6 19 



Finance 
6-4-75 



University of 

Massachusetts 

"Zero Balance" 

Advance Payroll 

System 

(Doc. T75-140) 



4 620 



Stu. Affairs 
6-4-75 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Amherst — 
Residence Halls 
and Dining 
Commons, FY 1976 
(Doc. T75-130) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT AFFAIRS 

June 4, 1975; 9:00 a.m. 

Room 211, College II 
University of Massachusetts/Boston 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Shaler; Trustees 
Haigis, O'Keefe, Rothenburger , Shearer; Mr. Mehegan, 
recorder 

Office of the President : Mr. Gartenberg, Budget 
Director; Mr. Keith, Associate Vice President for 
University Policy 

UM/Amhers t : Dr. Gage, Vice Chancellor for Student 
Affairs 

Guests : Charles Ford, Anthony Gailliard, Dorothy 
Muller, Henry Ragin 



The meeting was called to order at 9:05 a.m. Chairman 
Shaler turned to the agenda, which consisted of Residence Halls 
and Dining Commons, FY 1976 — UM/Amherst (Doc. T75-130) . He in- 
formed the Committee that a vote which had been taken at the 
May 20 meeting had contained an error in wording, and he asked 
for a motion to reconsider the vote. The vote should have been 
a recommendation to the Executive Committee. It was so moved, 
seconded and 

VOTED : To reconsider the Committee vote of May 20, 1975 
with respect to the use of Residence halls at the 
University of Massachusetts at Amherst. 

It was then moved to adopt the vote as amended. Upon 
a second, it was 

VOTED: To recommend to the Executive Committee that, 

effective the fall semester 1975, for one year, 
all full-time undergraduate students (enrolled 
for twelve semester credits or more) on the 
Amherst campus be required to live in on-campus 
residence halls during their freshman, sophomore, 
and junior years. Exemption from this require- 
ment may be granted to the following: married 
students, veterans, students living in and 
commuting from the home of their parent (s) or 
guardians while in attendance at the Univer- 
sity, and resident members of fraternities or 
sororities at the Amherst campus. 

The Chairman next turned to a similar vote with respect 
to the use of dining commons on the Amherst campus. This vote 



r 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

had been defeated at the May 20 meeting but, at the urgent request 
of Chancellor Bromery, it had been placed upon the agenda for 
today's meeting for further discussion. 

Chairman Shaler informed the Committee that there was 
already a policy voted by the Trustees which required subscription 
to use of the dining commons, but the present regulation exempted 
students over the age of 21. He observed that the Amherst campus 
understandably wished to change the exemptions to the rule, since 
the 21-year-old exemption was no longer in conformity with the age 
of majority. If the Trustees did not change the policy, the 
Chairman said, the old rule would remain in effect. 

Vice Chancellor Gage told the Committee that the Amherst 
campus strongly favored the eventual replacement of mandatory use 
of residence halls and dining facilities with a voluntary system. 
But this change could not be put into effect by September, he said, 
because of the extensive planning and advance preparation that would 
be required. Although studies and the experience of other Univer- 
sities have shown that, with a voluntary system which is properly 
planned and managed there would be a waiting list of students 
wishing to get into the dormitories, a hasty change-over would be 
a disaster. 



If 

the number of 
order to meet 
would have to 
in turn would 
less competit 
said Dr. Gage 
hundred full- 



the mandatory rule were dropped at this time, he said, 
boarding plan subscribers would drop by half. In 
the $670,000 annual debt service then, the University 
double the rates for the remaining students. This 
make the residence halls and dining commons even 
ive, driving out still more students. In addition, 
, a changeover now would result in the layoff of a 
time staff and three hundred student staff. 



Dr. Gage stressed, in answer to Trustee Shearer's ques- 
tion about the length of time this policy would continue, that the 
votes on the residence halls and the dining commons would have the 
effect of compelling the campus to return in a year with a new 
proposal. He said he fully expected to return to the Trustees with 
a proposal for a voluntary system by December 1975 for Board action 
by February, There being no further discussion, it was moved, 
seconded, and 

VOTED: To recommend to the Executive Committee that, 

effective the fall semester, 1975 for one year, 
all full-time undergraduate students (enrolled 
for twelve semester credits or more) on the Am- 
herst campus be required to subscribe to a 
boarding plan in the campus dining commons 
during their freshman, sophomore, and junior 
years. Exemption from this requirement may be 
granted to the following: married students, 
veterans, students living in and commuting 



4 621 



Stu. Affairs 
6-4-75 



4622 



Stu. Affairs 
6-4-75 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

from the home of their parent (s) or guardian 
while in attendance at the University, and 
resident members of fraternities or sororities 
at the Amherst campus. 

Trustee O'Keefe cited a suggestion made at the joint 
meeting of the Trustee Budget and Finance Committees by Trustee 
Gordon, that the campus explore the possibility of executing a 
contract with a food service company to manage the campus dining 
facilities. Trustee Gordon had said it would be desirable for 
the campus to try out such a system on a few dining facilities 
to determine if such a system of operation would be feasible, and 
Trustee O'Keefe suggested that it be tried with a view toward a 
changeover by the Spring semester of 1976. 

Dr. Gage remarked that such an experiment might not 
yield the kind of data which would be useful. He also said that 
the fiscal planning for FY 1976 had been based upon a complete 
University-run system. To sign a contract for outside management 
of a few dining commons would throw the fiscal projections for 
FY 1976 off balance. It might be necessary to have careful con- 
trols on such an experiment. He explained further that the campus 
had asked five food service firms if they would be interested in 
taking over the operation of the dining commons altogether. The 
firms had indicated some interest if the mandatory rule were to 
remain in effect. If it were to be dropped, they might bid, but 
indicated little interest in being sharply competitive. The most 
they would offer, said Dr. Gage, was management consultation in a 
conversion to a voluntary system of a fast-food operation. 

There being no further business to come before the Com- 
mittee, the meeting was adjourned at 9:30 a.m. 



I 



(J;iadyd(jKeith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



I 



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COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEES ON THE BUDGET AND FINANCE 

June 4, 1975; 9:30 a.m. 

Room 207, College II, Harbor Campus 
University of Massachusetts/Boston 
Boston, Massachusetts 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairmen Carlson and Gordon; 
Trustees Breyer, Croce, O'Keefe, Robertson, Rothenburger , 
Rowland, Troy, Weldon; Treasurer Johnson; Ms. Eichel, 
recorder 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice Presi- 
dent for Academic Affairs; Mr. Gartenberg, Budget Director; 
Mrs. Hanson, Assistant Budget Director; Mr. Lewis, Staff 
Assistant, Budget Office; Mr. Searson, General Counsel; 
Mr. O'Leary, Assistant Counsel 

UM/ Amherst : Dr. Gage, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs; 
Mr. Gulko, Budget Director; Prof. Fletcher, Faculty 
Representative 

UM/Boston : Mr. Hamilton, Vice Chancellor for Administra- 
tion and Finance; Mr. Baxter, Budget Director; Mr. Tubbs, 
Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs; Ms. Furman, Assis- 
tant to the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs 

UM/Worcester : Mr. Stockwell, Associate Dean of Adminis- 
trative Affairs and Hospital Director; Dr. Wheeler, 
Chief of Surgery 

Guests : Charles Ford, UM/Boston, student; Dorothy Muller 
and Henry Ragin, UM/Amherst, students 



The meeting was called to order at 9:35 a.m. by Trustee 
Carlson, Chairman of the Committee on the Budget. Trustee Carlson 
said that at the meeting of the combined Committees on May 27, the 
various fee changes had been discussed, some had been amended, and 
it had been suggested that a few be deferred for further study. 
Since a quorum was not present, he said, this special meeting had 
been called for the purpose of voting on the various fee changes. 
He remarked that copies of the proposed votes had been distributed 
and that he would ask for votes on each item separately. 

Trustee Carlson turned first to the proposed FY 1976 Fee- 
based Budget , UM/Amherst ( Doc. T75-121) , indicating that the Com- 



4623 



mittee would not be voting on the budget itself, which would be 
approved at a later date, but would vote on the individual fee 
changes contained therein. He then called for three votes related 
to boarding halls. On motion made and seconded, it was 



UM/Amherst — 
Fee-based Budget 
(Doc. T75-121) 



4 6 24 



Budget & Finance 
6-4-75 

Loan of funds to 
Boarding Hall 
Trust Fund 

COMMITTEE 



Dining Hall Fees 



Residence Hall 
Fees 



VOTED 



It was also 



VOTED 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees a loan 
of up to $110,000 to the Boarding Hall Trust 
Fund from the Student Housing Room Deposit 
(#0-16510) at 5.0% yearly interest, compounded 
monthly, to provide working capital subject 
to repayment on or before October 1, 1975. 



To recommend to the Board of Trustees and to 
the University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority that the following schedule of 
charges be adopted effective September 1, 
1975 for meals served in dining facilities 
included in the Third, Fifth, Seventh, and 
Ninth Projects of the Authority: 

A. For any 10 meals in the weekly period, 
Monday through Friday, within the 
academic semester — $328.00. 

B. For any 14 meals per week within the 
academic semester — $368.00. 

C. For all 19 meals per week within the 
academic semester — $403.00. 



It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, 
effective September 1, 1975, the following 
be adopted as the schedule of charges for 
meals to be served in Worcester Dining 
Commons : 

A. For any 10 meals in the weekly period, 
Monday through Friday, within the 
academic semester — $328.00. 

B. For any 14 meals per week within the 
academic semester — $368.00. 

C. For all 19 meals per week within the 
academic semester — $403.00. 

Trustee Carlson then turned to the proposed votes 
dealing with fee increases for the residence halls. Trustee 
O'Keefe asked whether it would be possible to obtain the addi- 
tional funds required by using money from the reserve account 
rather than increasing fees to students, to which Trustee Carlson 
replied that at the May 27 meeting this matter had been discussed, 
and it had been the opinion of campus administration that to do so 



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COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

would not be prudent, since the reserve account is maintained to 
handle emergencies. Trustee Gordon, Chairman of the Finance Com- 
mittee, asked that dialogue begin immediately between the students 
and the Amherst administration with regard to the proper balance 
between reserves and inflationary costs, so that the Committee 
will have the benefit of their advice in enough time for thorough 
discussion before a vote is required on fees for FY 1977. 

There being no further discussion, on motion made and 
seconded, it was 



I 



VOTED : 



To recommend to the Board of Trustees and to 
the University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority, that the following per occupant 
charges reflecting either a $25 or $30 in- 
crease in all projects be approved, effective 
September 1, 1975: 



4 625 



Budget & Finance 
6-4-75 



Project 

Project I 

Project II, IV, VI, VII, 

X 
Project XII 



Annual 
Charge 

$645.00 

$705.00 
$725.00 



Semester 
Charge 

$322.50 

$352.50 
$362.50 



I 



It was also 



VOTED : 



To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
effective September 1, 1975, the following 
charges be established for student accom- 
modations in dormitories in the Residence 
Hall Trust Fund: 



Condition 

Renovated 
Unrenovated 



Annual 
Charge 

$705.00 
$645.00 



Semester 
Charge 

$352.50 
$322.50 



It was further 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
effective immediately the conference rates 
in the Residence Hall Trust Fund dormitories 
be as follows: 



Single Room: 



New Rates 
(/night /person) 

Basic Service $3.00 
Intermediate 

Service $5.00 

Full Service $9.50 



Present Rates 
(/night /person) 

$2.75 

N/A 
$9.00 



4626 



Budget & Finance 
6-4-75 



COMMITTEE 



Married Student 
Housing Rent 
Increases 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Double Room: 



Basic Service 
Intermediate 

Service 
Full Service 



$3.00 

$3.75 
$6.50 



$2.75 

$3.25 
$6.50 



It was then 



VOTED 



To recommend to the Board of Trustees and 
to the University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority that the conference rates in all 
dormitories of the Authority shall be as 
follows : 



Single Room: 



Double Room: 



Basic Service 
Intermediate 

Service 
Full Service 

Basic Service 
Intermediate 

Service 
Full Service 



New Rates 
(/night /person) 

$3.00 

$5.00 
$9.50 

$3.00 

$3.75 
$6.50 



Present Rates 
(/night /person) 

$2.75 

N/A 
$9.00 

$2.75 

$3.25 
$6.50 



\ 



Trustee Carlson then turned to the subject of Married 
Student Housing and asked for comments with regard to these fees. 
Mr. Gulko suggested that Dr. Gage might wish to comment on the 
status of negotiations between the campus administration and the 
University of Massachusetts Tenants Association with regard to 
FY 1975 fees. Dr. Gage reported that an agreement had been 
reached between the students and the administration whereby the 
students had turned over to the University most of the money held 
in escrow during the rent strike, and that the campus administra- 
tion and the students were currently discussing the possibility 
of a student cooperative to handle married students' housing 
affairs. He said there had been no opposition to the proposed 
rent changes . 

There being no further questions, on motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees and 

to the University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority, where appropriate, that the 
following monthly charges be approved 
effective September 1, 1975: 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



COMMITTEE 



North Village 
(UMBA Project 13) 

Lincoln Apartments 
(Residence Hall 
Trust Fund) 

University Apartments 
(Residence Hall 
Trust Fund) 



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New 


FY 1975 




Number 


Monthly 


Monthly 


Type 


of Units 


Rates 


Rates 


One Bedroom 


120 


$175.50 


$165 


Two Bedroom 


120 


$195.50 


$185 


Studio 


24 


$122.50 


$115 


One Bedroom 


65 


$138.00 


$130 


Two Bedroom 


16 


$138.00 


$130 


Studio 


11 


$117.00 


$110 


One Bedroom 








Efficiency 


6 


$143.50 


$135 


One Bedroom 


6 


$165.00 


$155 


Two Bedroom 








Efficiency 


18 


$170.00 


$160 


Two Bedroom 


6 


$191.00 


$180 


Three Bedroom 


3 


$212.50 


$200 



It was also 



VOTED 



To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, 
effective June 1, 1975, the Amherst campus 
be authorized to offer short-term reduced 
rates to new eligible tenants in Married 
Student Housing at the following amounts: 



Lincoln: 



University: 



Studio 

1 Bedroom 

2 Bedroom 



Studio 

1 Bedroom efficiency 

1 Bedroom 

2 Bedroom efficiency 

2 Bedroom 

3 Bedroom 



Full 


Authorized 


FY 1976 


Reduced 


Rate 


Rate 


(per mo. ) 


(per mo.) 


$122.00 


$ 90.00 


138.00 


100.00 


138.00 


100.00 


$117.00 


$ 85.00 


143.50 


100.00 


165.00 


115.00 


170.00 


120.00 


191.00 


135.00 


212.50 


150.00 



In no case shall a new tenant be granted the 
reduced rate for more than three summer months 
and not beyond August 31, of each year. 



4627 



Budget & 
6-4-75 



Finance 



4 628 



Budget & Finance 
6-4-75 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees and to 
the University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority that, effective June 1, 1975, the 
Amherst campus be authorized to offer short- 
term reduced rates to new eligible tenants 
at the following amounts: 



Type 

North Village: 
UMBA Project 13 



Campus Center 
Garage Rates 



1 Bedroom 

2 Bedroom 



Full 
FY 1976 

Rate 
(per mo . ) 



$175.50 
196.50 



Authorized 
Reduced 

Rate 
(per mo. ) 



$125.00 
140.00 



In no case shall a new tenant be granted the 
reduced rate for more than three summer months 
and not beyond August 31, 1975. 

Trustee Carlson next asked for two votes dealing with 
rates for the Campus Center Garage. Trustee Gordon asked whether 
this matter had been discussed with the University of Massachusetts 
Building Authority since the time of the May 27 meeting. Trustee 
Troy said he did not believe that it had, and emphasized the impor- 
tance of consulting the Authority with regard to issues which 
directly affect it. Treasurer Johnson informed the Committee that 
the Board of Trustees had to obtain the concurrence of the Building 
Authority on all votes affecting its projects, and a motion was 
made to amend the vote to indicate that the Committee was recom- 
mending the increases to both the Board of Trustees and the 
Building Authority. A motion was then made and seconded, and it was. 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees and to 
the University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority that the following be established 
as the rates for the Campus Center Parking 
Garage, effective July 2, 1975. 

$.30 per hour to a maximum of $1.25 for 
9 hours. At hour #9 the rate will be 
increased by $.15 per half hour to a 
maximum of $2.50 for 24 hours. First 
hour $.30 minimum and second hour $.30 
for any portion of that hour. 

Hotel Guests - $1.50 per night. 

Permanent rates will be $10.50 per 
month allowing two motor vehicles 
per space. For more than two cars, 
an additional $1 per car per month 
will be charged. For the months of 



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COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

December and January, the fee will be 
$16 per month payable before December 1. 

Sixth level books will be sold for $19.50 
with a nine hour limit per ticket. 

Five Physical Plant service spaces will be 
available for repair and plant personnel 
24 hours daily. 

Motorcycles - $5 per calendar month using 
designated spaces in transient area. 



It was further 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
it be established as policy that the Garage 
Manager has authority to tow illegally 
parked vehicles from level one and handi- 
capped areas in the Campus Center Garage. 

Trustee Carlson then asked for a vote on hourly and weekly 
fees for the Day Care Center. There being no discussion on this 
matter, on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees es- 
tablish the following schedule of fees for 
child care on the Amherst campus effective 
September 1, 1975. All fees are for one 
semester. 



University Laboratory School 



University Day School 



New World Day School 



North Village Day School 



Grass Roots School 



Infant Care 



$50 for two 2 hour sessions per 

week 

$100 for four 2%. hour sessions 

per week 

$150 for five 4 hour sessions 
per week 

$135 for five 3^ hour sessions 
per week 

$150 for five 4 hour morning 
sessions per week 
$120 for five 3h hour after- 
noon sessions per week 

$150 for five 4 hour sessions 
per week (full fee) 
$120 for five 4 hour sessions 
per week (cooperative) 

$180 for five 8 hour sessions 
per week 



4 629 



Budget & Finance 
6-4-75 



Day Care Center 
Rates 



£6 30 



Budget & Finance 
6-4-75 

Action Deferred 
on Graduate Stu- 
dent Program Fee 

COMMITTEE 



Graduate Student 
Tax 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Carlson then introduced the matter of the Grad- 
uate Program Fee, asking Counsel Searson for his recommendation. 
Counsel Searson asked that the vote on this fee be deferred until 
such time as he could review this matter in more detail to make 
sure that it conformed with the statute governing trust funds, 
Chapter 75, Section II. On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To defer action to increase the graduate 

program fee pending further review of this 
matter by University Counsel. 

Trustee Carlson next asked for a vote on the Graduate 
Student Tax, which he said had been approved by the Graduate 
Student Senate. There being no discussion, on motion made and 
seconded, it was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

for the academic year effective September 1, 
1975, the graduate student tax be estab- 
lished at $26.00. 

University Health Trustee Carlson then asked for two votes with relation 

Services Fees to the University Health Services. These votes, he said, cover 
for Dental and fees for eye care and dental care and were discussed at the last 
Eye Care meeting of the Committee. There being no questions on motion 

made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, 
effective July 1, 1975 a fee for service 
for the eye examinations of $10 per visit 
be established. 



It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, 
effective July 1, 1975 fees for dental 
services be charged according to the at- 
tached schedule. Fees noted as prepaid 
will not be billed to students, as this 
is included in the health care provided 
by the Student Health Fee. 
(Schedule appended as Attachment A.) 

Trustee Carlson turned next to the proposed Horseback 
Riding Trust Fund about which questions had been raised at the 
previous meeting. Mr. Searson asked that this vote be delayed 
until he could review more thoroughly its conformity to the Trust 
Fund statute. On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To defer action to establish a Horseback 
Riding Trust Fund, pending further review 
by University Counsel. 



Action Deferred 
on Horseback 
Riding Trust 
Fund 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The next agenda item involved fees for international pro- 
grams, and Trustee Carlson asked if there were any questions on 
this item. There being none, on motion made and seconded, it was 



VOTED: 



To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, 
effective July 1, 1975 the fees for students 
involved in the various foreign programs be 
established as follows: 



Program 

Freiburg Year* 
Freiburg Summer 
Oxford Summer 
Grenoble/PAU Summer* 



Fee 

$ 300 
1,025 
1,010 
1,010 
300 
775 



4631 



Budget & Finance 
6-4-75 

International 
Programs 



UMass Student 

Non-Umass 

Student 



*Does not include travel or room and board 



Trustee Carlson next asked for two votes covering pro- 
posed increases in the fees for telephone service in dormitories. 
There being no discussion of this item, on motion made and seconded, 
it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees and to 
the Building Authority that, effective Sep- 
tember 1, 1975 the new rate for dormitory 
room telephone charges in all Building Au- 
thority dormitories be $20.00 per semester 
or $40.00 per year. 

It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the new rate for dormitory room telephone 
charges in all dormitories of the Residence 
Hall Trust Fund be $20.00 per semester or 
$40.00 per year. These new rates shall be 
effective September 1, 1975. 

Trustee Carlson next asked for action with regard to the 
proposed increases voted by the Stockbridge Student Senate. On 
motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
effective September 1, 1975, the following 
schedule be established as the Stockbridge 
Student Annual Tax charge: 



Residence Hall 
Telephone Trust 
Fund 



Stockbridge 
Student Annual 
Tax 



4632 



Budget & Finance 
6-4-75 



COMMITTEE 



Action Deferred 
on Fees Related 
to Composition 
Service Trust 
Fund, Adminis- 
trative Data 
Processing and 
Management Sys- 
tems Group 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Class of 1977 Class of 1977 
Class of 1976 Regular Students Placement 

Students 



Student Activities 

Distinguished Visitors 
Program Tax 



$52.50 



$52.50 



$52.50 



Class Tax 



TOTAL 



1 


50 


11 


,00 


$65 


00 


$56 


00 



1.50 


1.50 


6.25 


6.25 


$60.25 


$60.25 


$55.00 


$51.50 



Comparable FY 1975 Tax 



Trustee Carlson introduced the last three categories of 
fee changes, those dealing with type-setting costs under the pro- 
posed establishment of a Composition Service Trust Fund, those 
connected to Administrative Data Processing services, and those 
related to the Management Systems Group established in July 1974. 
He said he understood that there were still legal questions to 
be resolved on these issues. Mr. Searson confirmed this fact, and 
on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To defer action with regard to fees related to 

the Composition Service Trust Fund, the Adminis- 
trative Data Processing Services and the Manage- 
ment Systems Group pending further review by 
the University Counsel. 

Trustee Carlson then turned to the matter of the Pro- 
posed FY76 Fee Increases - Boston Campus (Doc. T75-132) . He 
asked if there were any questions with regard to the proposed fees. 
Trustee Rothenburger asked if it would be in order to hear from 
Charles Ford, President of the Student Activities Committee, with 
regard to the process by which the fees for the Boston campus 
came to the Committees. Trustee Carlson said such a report would 
be helpful to the Committees. Mr. Ford informed the Committees 
that he had received a memorandum from Vice Chancellor Tubbs 
asking for recommendations from the Student Activities Committee 
with regard to University health services. This request came in 
the middle of reading week and the exam period, and therefore he 
had not been able to get a quorum of members of the SAC Steering 
Committee to deal with the issue. However, a group of SAC members, 
not members of the Steering Committee, did meet and delineated a 
rationale for health fee increases. This rationale was forwarded 
to the Steering Committee of the University Assembly, but it was 
returned to the SAC indicating that more formal recognition of the 
provisions was necessary. Mr. Ford said that he took the matter 
to the full body of the SAC, after which the provisions were re- 
turned to the Assembly Steering Committee. Appropriate channels 
were followed in this review of the Health Service Fee increase 
and Mr. Ford indicated the concurrence of the SAC in the extended 
services which this fee would provide. He emphasized the importance 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

of the provisions for upgrading and extending medical services in 
the establishment of these health fees. Upon motion made and sec- 
onded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the fee increases proposed by the University of 
Massachusetts at Boston as set forth in Doc. T75- 
132, effective July 1, 1975. 

Trustee Gordon reiterated his suggestion that dialogue 
commence early in the year between all components of student govern- 
ment and the campus administration at both UM/Boston and UM/Amherst 
with regard to fee increases so that this material can be presented 
to the Budget and Finance Committees after full and extensive re- 
view by these groups and that their input can be presented through 
the proper channels to those Trustees who have to make the decisions 

Trustee Carlson then asked the members of the Budget Com- 
mittee to consider an amendment to the vote taken at the May 27 
meeting related to the Continuing Resolution, which will allow the 
University to spend money until the new budget is adopted. He said 
the proposed amendment would add after the words, "That the Presi- 
dent be authorized to approve," the following phrase: "and adopt 
the policies and procedures governing" so that the vote proposed to 
the Board of Trustees would read as follows: 

VOTED : That the President be authorized to approve 
and adopt the policies and procedures gov- 
erning the expenditure of State and non-state 
funds by the three campuses, the Office of the 
President, and the Institute for Governmental 
Services from July 1, 1975 until such time as 
the Board of Trustees adopts the Operating 
Budget for FY 1976. 

The approval of expenditure of State funds 
shall be consistent with the appropriate 
State statutes governing the FY 1976 
appropriation. 

Trustee Carlson asked if there was any further business to 
come before the Committees. Trustee O'Keefe 

MOVED : That the UMass/Amherst Fiscal Year 1976 fee- 
based budget contain no restrictions which 
preclude the right of the Legal Services 
Office to sue the University and defend stu- 
dents in criminal actions. 

Trustee Carlson said that he did not see how this action 
was related to fee changes. He said this was an entirely separate 
issue, since there were no such restrictions mentioned in the budget 
document. Trustee O'Keefe said such a vote would make it possible 



4 6 33 



Budget & Finance 
6-4-75 



UM/Amherst — 
Rights of Stu- 
dent Legal 
Services 



4 634 



Budget 
6-4-75 



& Finance 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

for the students to obtain a court ruling on these issues. He 
said it was his understanding that at the present time there was 
a law prohibiting the use of state funds for the purpose of suing 
the state. 

Trustee Carlson asked Counsel Searson to explain to the 
Committees the issues involved. Mr. Searson stated that this 
matter had been discussed at some length at the May 20 meeting of 
the Committee on Student Affairs, that it was a complicated issue 
and that he could see some legal problems; e.g., a possible con- 
flict of interest and a question of legal ethics. He said that 
he did not feel it would be in the best interests of the Trustees 
to make a decision with regard to this matter at the present time. 
He said he had requested from the students a written statement of 
the results of their research on this matter, but that they had 
not complied with this request. He suggested that the matter be 
tabled until he had time to give more study to the matter. Trustee 
Gordon asked how soon Counsel could render an opinion on this sub- 
ject, and Mr. Searson replied that he hoped that it would be ready 
in a month or so. Trustee Carlson said the Committee could not 
vote without a prior written opinion from Counsel. On motion made 
and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To table the matter related to the rights of 
the Legal Services Office to sue the Univer- 
sity and to defend students in criminal actions. 

Trustees O'Keefe and Rothenburger voted against this motion. 

Trustee Carlson asked the students to provide the Counsel 
and the Trustees with their research on this subject. Trustee 
Breyer said it would be helpful if the students would provide 
Trustees with information before they ask for decisions. He said 
it would be helpful to know what the issue is and what action is 
desired. Trustee Carlson asked that this information be provided 
to the Trustees before the August Board meeting. 

There being no further business, the meeting adjourned 
at 10:08 a.m. 



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(JladysVKeith Hardy V 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

June 4, 1975; 10:00 a.m. 

Room 211, College II 
Harbor Campus 
University of Massachusetts/Boston 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Healey, President 
Wood; Trustees Abrams, Bicknell, Breyer, Carlson, Croce, 
Gordon, Haigis, O'Keefe, Robertson, Rothenburger , Rowland, 
Shaler, Shearer, Spiller, Troy, Weldon; Mr. Callahan 
representing Trustee Anrig; Secretary Parks representing 
Trustee Dukakis; Secretary Hardy, Treasurer Johnson, Mr. 
Mehegan, recorder 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice Presi- 
dent for Academic Affairs; Mr. Edelman, Vice President for 
University Policy; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for 
Planning; Mr. Cass, Director of the Institute for Labor 
Affairs; Mr. Gartenberg, Budget Director; Mrs. Hanson, 
Assistant Budget Director; Mr. Kaplan, Assistant Vice 
President for Organization and Management; Mr. O'Leary, 
Assistant Counsel; Mr. Post, Assistant Vice President for 
Planning; Mr. Searson, General Counsel 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Dr. Gage, Vice Chancellor 
for Student Affairs; Professor Fletcher, Faculty Represen- 
tative; Mr. Gulko, Budget Director; Ms. Stack, Graduate 
Student Representative 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Hamilton, Vice Chan- 
cellor for Administration and Finance; Professor Gagnon, 
Faculty Representative 

UM/Worcester : Mr. Stockwell, Associate Dean for Adminis- 
trative Affairs and Hospital Director; Dr. wheeler, Hos- 
pital Chief of Staff 

Guests : Mr. Bernard Ingster of Hay Associates; Ms. Ellen 
Flannery 



The meeting was called to order at 10:10 a.m. Chairman 
Healey called upon the President, who introduced Mr. Bernard Ingster 
of Hay Associates. The President said that Mr. Ingster would pro- 
vide a general presentation on the organizational effectiveness 
section of the Hay Report, A Study of the Administrative Resources 
within the University of Massachusetts . 

In his introduction, Mr. Ingster said Hay Associates 
appreciated this opportunity to make what he described as a major 
study. He stressed at the outset the importance of seeing all of 
the findings as an integrated whole, and said he was gratified that 
the Trustees shared this view. 



4 6 35 



Hay Report 



4636 



Executive 
6-4-75 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Ingster explained that Hay Associates had concerned 
itself exclusively with human resources in the management process, 
and he observed that this involved far more than mere issues of 
financial compensation, but included also the impact upon individuals 
of organization structure and dynamics. 



Speaking of the method which Hay Associates used, Mr. 
Ingster explained that the study had been carried out in a far 
different manner from similar studies in industrial organizations. 
In industrial organizations, he said, it is far more customary to 
make extensive use of the organization's own staff in a direct way, 
and added that only in rare cases is the consultant in private 
industry told to consider and make judgments independent of the 
organization itself. He said, however, that the study of the 
University of Massachusetts had been conducted in just such an 
independent way. Although at one point observations and recommenda- 
tions had been provided to Mr. Kaplan to make sure they did not 
ignore important University organizational components, Mr. Ingster 
said he could think of no instance where a conclusion or recommenda- 
tion had been changed as a result. 

Without recapitulating all of the report's findings, Mr. 
Ingster cited what he saw as a strong interest of the University's 
key leadership in continued development of a true system of higher 
education. He said the University is now at a critical point — if 
it delays the changes necessary for continued development, its 
potential will begin to degrade. Specifically, he said, it would 
be unfortunate if the University were to continue the dichotomy — 
which he said had been appropriate in the first five years of 
multicampus existence — between policy and operations by which the 
President is restricted to identification and conceptualization 
of policy while actual implementation is delegated to the campuses. 
This process, Mr. Ingster said, must be altered if the possibility 
of creating a system of public higher education is not to be for- 
ever precluded, and he said the only way to alter it is to in- 
crease the role of the Office of the President in policy develop- 
ment. The President, he said, would not simply send a document 
to a campus and order that it be implemented. Rather, he would 
work closely with the campuses in translating concepts into func- 
tional services while bearing the responsibility for the effective- 
ness of the development process and the final function. 

As things stand, said Mr. Ingster, fiscal and program 
information available for decision-making is relatively incomplete 
and fragmentary in its sources. He stressed that an integrated, 
comprehensive data system for strategic decision-making at the 
University of Massachusetts is absolutely vital. 

Mr. Ingster urged the creation of the Organizational 
Design and Review Committee. This committee, he said, would con- 
sider recommendations which affect issue of organization at the 
University. The totality of functions which have to be examined 
in considering fundamental organizational change would be examined 
by this committee, covering the whole range of organizational 
effectiveness . 



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COMMITTEE 



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He also urged that the central budget office be provided 
with greater technical influence over the campus-level budget pro- 
cess, and that the budget director have the capacity to set forth 
general guidelines for the campuses' use. 

Questions and discussion followed about the meaning and 
impact of the system in comparison with the branch institution. In 
a system, said Mr. Ingster, the autonomy of the Chancellor is greater 
than in a branch University where, for example, the provost may be 
inclined to relate directly to the President. Further, he said, 
there tends to be a greater differentiation of roles among the var- 
ious campuses within the system; when a campus is given a special 
mission within the system, the campus chief executive can con- 
centrate on that mission. The branch campus, he said, is a very 
tightly centralized organizational unit. 

Mr. Ingster added that one of the changes which often 
takes place after a transformation to a system is that the campus 
executive gets some relief from the continuing focus on the non- 
academic aspects of leadership. He acquires a greater opportunity 
to concentrate on student affairs, academic program design and 
development, and formulation of academic offerings. A turning 
inward to campus affairs takes place. 

Chairman Healey asked how the organization design review 
process should begin, and Mr. Ingster replied that a start should 
be made with conditions as they now are, with changes to evolve 
over a period of time. 

Chancellor Bromery asked whether, in a system, every 
function should be physically located at the system office. Mr. 
Ingster answered that this need not be the case — that, in fact, 
most of the higher education systems in the country have not 
aggregated all resources at the center. It is not only possible, 
he said, but in some cases highly desirable that an operating ser- 
vice be supplied from a campus. Before such a service comes into 
operation on a system-wide basis, however, it is important that the 
influence of the Office of the President in fulfilling its respon- 
sibility for policy implementation not be detached too soon. 

There were several questions about the role of the Trustees 
in the administration of the University. Mr. Ingster said the 
Trustees can frequently play an initiative role in stimulating new 
programming and in changing the direction of the University. But 
he said their primary role should be to hold the executive account- 
able for the development and implementation of policy; they should 
place the burden on the leadership of the University to develop the 
educational initiatives and management programming which will insure 
that the work of the University will go on. It is Hay's belief, he 
said, that the initiatives must remain with the executive, while 
the Trustees should place upon the President the responsibility to 
develop the management review techniques which the Trustees can use 
to determine whether or not the Office of the President is operating 
effectively. 



4637 



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6-4-75 



4 6 38 



Executive 
6-4-75 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Addressing the issue of the role of the Trustees, Chair- 
man Healey observed that the initiative for the creation of the 
new campuses came from the Trustees; indeed, he said, the initia- 
tive for the creation of a system of higher education came from 
the Trustees. While the campuses should always be encouraged to 
initiate policy proposals through the governance process, the 
Trustees should not hesitate to take an active part in determining 
University policy. 

Further discussion followed on the issue of cooperation 
between the Office of the President and the campuses. Mr. Ingster 
stressed that the development of policy must have the participation 
of the campuses, otherwise the system cannot operate. Although a 
"unilateral operation" would constitute an ineffective system, he 
said, the ultimate capacity to say "no" must rest with the Office 
of the President, since the responsibility toward the public 
interest must rest at his level. 

Trustee Robertson asked how to draw the line between 
policy initiation and development, and interference with campus- 
level implementation. No manager, he said, wants his superior to 
be looking over his shoulder as he attempts to implement policy, 
and he suggested that it might be desirable to leave a chancellor 
free to implement policy according to his own best judgment. Mr. 
Ingster strongly emphasized that, although this idea is often 
expressed — "tell me what to do and never mind how I do it as long 
as it gets done" — it is highly inappropriate. Any chief executive 
who would follow that principle, he said, is courting disaster for 
the institution because the implementation of policy affects policy 
itself . 

Among other important areas of discussion were: 

— That efficiency and effectiveness should be sought 
while careful consideraton of the importance of 
the special quality of an academic institution 
be maintained. 

— That the proposed vote addressed mainly matters 
of financial planning and control at this time, 
and not matters of governance or principal 
officers . 

— That the present understaf f ing of the Office of 
the President seriously undermines its effective- 
ness and, as presently constituted, is in serious 
contravention of Hay Associates' major recommenda- 
tions. Mr. Ingster described augmentation of the 
Office of the President as "inescapable." 

— That Hay Associates would provide the Committee 
with a restatement of the philosophy of the 
system of higher education which would address 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the concerns of presidential accountability 
vs. unjustified interference mentioned by 
Trustee Robertson. 

Professor Gagnon said the faculty representatives of both 
campuses should have an opportunity to see the Hay report before its 
recommendations are implemented. He said the report had not been 
made available to either him or Professor Fletcher. President Wood 
remarked that copies of the report had in fact been available for 
many weeks, and added that the report had been a matter of public 
record since his press conference of April 24. He expressed sur- 
prise that the faculty representatives had not taken the initiative 
to acquire copies of the report. 

A motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, in 
order to implement the Hay Associates Study on 
an interim basis (pending a comprehensive pre- 
sentation of policies and procedures to be made 
by the President to the Board of Trustees in 
September, 1975), it authorize the President to 
make the following adjustments in programs and 
organizational arrangements. 

— Adopt the recommended salary policy lines 
appearing as exhibit 25 of the Hay Study 
and apply them to the thirty-three senior 
executive positions analysed in the Hay 
Study and listed on page 30, resulting in 
new salary ranges for these positions. 

— Establish the Advisory Committee on Job Con- 
tent Measurement and the Evaluation Review 
Committee, described on pages 65-67 of the 
Hay Study, to measure, where appropriate, 
the job content of professional nonacademic 
positions at the University of Massachusetts, 
by means of the Hay developed guide charts 
and the Hay recommended position data ques- 
tionnaire and position description formats 
appearing in Section 9 of the study. Com- 
mittee recommendations of appropriate salary 
ranges shall be made to the President for his 
final authorization and shall be a revision 
to current delegations of authority. 

— Establish the Organization Design Review 
Committee, as described on pages 68-69 of 
the Hay Study, to review the organizational 
structure of the University. The composi- 
tion of the Committee shall be determined 

by the Board of Trustees. Committee evalua- 
tions and recommendations concerning organiza- 
tional structure shall be made to the President 



4 6 39 



Executive 
6-4-75 



4 6 40 



Executive 
6-4-75 



COMMITTEE 



Academic Per- 
sonnel Policy 
(Doc. T75-125) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

for his approval and submission to the 
Board of Trustees for adoption. 

— Reallocate the resources of the President's 
Office as required to strengthen its manage- 
ment capabilities, including the establish- 
ment of the position of vice president for 
financial planning and control, and accord- 
ingly restructure reporting relations of 
the management systems group and the ad- 
ministrative data processing center to place 
them on a University wide basis, and make 
appropriate adjustments in the Treasurer's 
Office to take into account these changes, 
including appropriate arrangements for its 
physical locations in Boston and Amherst. 

— Strengthen the University's internal audit 
mechanism to include the determination of 
the desirability of employing the open 
bidding process to select outside account- 
ing firms when appropriate. 

— Take such other actions to implement the 
foregoing as the President may deem appro- 
priate, notwithstanding any previous dele- 
gations of authority or retention of authority 
by the Board. However, salaries in excess of 
the maximum of the general salary schedule, 
salaries for Officers of the University and 
Chancellors shall require Board approval. 

At Chairman Healey's request, Trustee Troy, Chairman 
of the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy, reviewed 
that Committee's discussion and action on the Academic Personnel 
Policy ( Doc. T75-125) . The Ad Hoc Multicampus Personnel Policies 
Committee, he said, had met for more than sixty meeting-hours in 
drafting the policy, and the document had received careful study 
on the campuses, particularly the Amherst campus. The Committee 
on Faculty and Educational Policy had gone over the policy page by 
page, and had made a few amendments which the Executive Committee 
had received. Vice President Lynton pointed out that an errata 
sheet which rectified typing errors had been compiled and also 
included. Trustee Troy said the vote was a provisional one which 
included a commitment to review the document in May 1976. 

A discussion arose about the provision of the vote which 
stated that the policy would continue "only until September 1976." 
Both Trustee Gordon and Chancellor Bromery were concerned about a 
policy which would expire in one year. It was explained that the 
review and subsequent vote which the Board would take in August 
and September of 1976 was sure to take place, but Chancellor 
Bromery felt he would have difficulty implementing a policy with 
a one-year duration. 



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I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Wood and Trustee Breyer recalled that the Boston 
campus had been concerned that it have sufficient time to review 
the policy. This, he said, had led to the language in question. 
The President asked Chancellor Golino if replacing the phrase "only 
until September 1..." with "...to be reviewed by the Board of Trust- 
ees on or before September 1, 1976..." would be acceptable to the 
Boston campus. Chancellor Golino recalled that the concern of the 
Assembly had been about the adequacy of UM/Bos ton's review, and he 
said that if the adequacy of this process was assured, the new 
wording would be acceptable. It was therefore moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees adopt 
the University Academic Personnel Policy con- 
tained in Document T75-125, as amended, pro- 
vided, however, that Section 6.1(a) shall apply 
only to instructors appointed after July 1, 
1975; and 

That, recognizing the importance of further 
review of the Academic Personnel Policy, in- 
cluding full discussion and evaluation by 
all members of the University community and 
recognizing further the need for additional 
consideration by the Boston campus, this 
policy shall be reviewed by the Board of 
Trustees on or before September 1, 1976; and 

That Documents T63-050, T64-061 (except for 
Part II, Articles 5-7), T73-069 and any other 
policy, rule or regulation incompatible with 
the Policy are rescinded; and 

That the President, after consultation with 
campus governance units and an ad hoc multi- 
campus academic personnel policy committee, 
review said Policy and recommend any appro- 
priate modifications thereto no later than 
May, 1976. 

The meeting turned to proposed Group Practice Rules and 
Regulations for UM/Worcester (Doc. T75-144) . Vice President Edel- 
man told the Committee that the plan had three purposes: (1) to 
achieve a balance between a faculty member's teaching and his or 
her clinical practice, (2) to regulate effectively the take-home 
compensation of faculty members as well as to limit the state's 
contribution, and (3) to maximize the amount of clinical income 
which goes to the Medical School. 

He described the components of a full member's compensa- 
tion: (1) an annual base salary to be drawn from University funds, 
(2) a group practice salary which would guarantee the minimum level 
of total salary and would be paid from the Group Practice Trust 



4 6 41 



Executive 
6-4-75 



UM/Worcester — 
Group Practice 
Rules and 
Regulations 
(Doc. T75-144) 



4 6 42 



Executive 
6-4-75 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Amherst — 
Residence Halls 
and Dining 
Commons, FY 1976 
(Doc. T75-130) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Fund, and (3) an incentive overage, by which a member could re- 
ceive a percentage of clinical income generated above his group 
practice salary. The amount of the incentive overage would be 
regulated by Table III of the document. 

Trustee Bicknell asked if exceptions to the limits set 
forth in this table were anticipated, and both Mr. Edelman and Dr. 
Wheeler said there would be a few. Dr. Wheeler said it would be 
necessary to make these exceptions in order to recruit certain 
high-quality talent. 

Mr. Edelman said there would be a cash flow problem at 
first, since it would be necessary to pay out before sufficient 
funds would begin to flow in. He said the provision in the plan 
which allows the Medical School to receive approximately 50 percent 
of the clinical income remaining after other obligations are met, 
with the rest going to the departments which generated the income, 
is important. In fact, he emphasized, the Medical School could 
retain as much as 80 percent of the net income in the beginning. 
He also emphasized that the plan sets forth maximum compensation; 
it is hoped that actual salaries will be below the limits. 

Trustee Bicknell expressed reservations about the degree 
to which the plan fulfills the intent of item four of the Memo- 
randum of Understanding (Doc. T75-114A) . Discussion followed 
about the amount of consultation which had taken place with the 
executive branch of state government, during which Trustee Bick- 
nell said the Department of Public Health had not sufficiently 
reviewed the plan. Secretary Parks asked how much time the Depart- 
ment of Public Health would need to review the plan adequately, 
and Trustee Bicknell replied that with all the pertinent informa- 
tion, a review could be completed in no less than three working 
weeks . 

Dr. Wheeler stressed the necessity of having the plan 
in effect before July 1, and the proposal was made that the 
Executive Committee review the plan and act upon it on behalf of 
the Board at its scheduled June 25 meeting. This would give 
Trustee Bicknell the time needed to complete a review. It was, 
then, agreed that the Executive Committee would address the matter 
on June 25. 



The meeting recessed at 1:00 p.m., and reconvened at 



2:00 p.m. 



The final item was a proposed policy for Residence 
Halls and Dining Commons , FY 1976 at UM/Amherst (Doc. T75-130) . 
Trustee Shaler, Chairman of the Committee on Student Affairs, in- 
formed the members that his Committee had reviewed this matter at 
a meeting on May 20, and again at a meeting earlier in the day. 
The proposals, he said, had the recommendation of the Committee 
on Student Affairs. 

Chancellor Bromery told the Committee that this proposal, 
to maintain the rule on mandatory use of residence halls and dining 



1 



COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

commons (with some exceptions) , was a one-year measure dictated by 
fiscal necessity. He pointed out that the University had requested 
capital outlay funds for the past several years in part for the 
purpose of renovating the residence halls at a faster rate, but no 
funds had been appropriated for that purpose. It would also be 
desirable, he said, to refinance the bonds on the residence halls 
in order to keep down the cost of living in them. He said that a 
complex set of fiscal and legal issues had to be resolved for the 
University to make residence hall living desirable enough for a 
voluntary system to be workable. The University hoped to do this, 
he said, after necessary planning, but was reluctantly compelled 
at this time to ask the Trustees to continue the present system for 
one year with modifications in the exemptions. 

Secretary Parks expressed discomfort with the proposed 
exemption of students who live in fraternity and sorority houses. 
He described this as "elitist." Chairman Healey and others explained 
that the fraternities and sororities had supplied a vital number of 
spaces for students at a time when the Legislature was pressing the 
University to accept more students. Indeed, the University had 
urged them to expand. It was pointed out that not all members of 
fraternities are exempted, but only those who reside in the houses 
on the campus . 

Trustee O'Keefe initiated a discussion of what he des- 
cribed as extremely poor living conditions in the residence halls. 
He said they were densely overcrowded, that there was a high level 
of noise and vandalism, and said these conditions made study 
impossible. 

Chancellor Bromery agreed that the conditions in some of 
the residence halls needed improvement, but said that in order to 
institute the changes in occupancy and rent structure which were 
desirable, it would be necessary to change the debt retirement 
system. It would be desirable from the University's point of view, 
he said, if the Commonwealth were to take over the financing of the 
residence halls. There was further discussion, focusing on spe- 
cifics of residence hall management, after which a motion was made, 
seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, 
effective the fall semester 1975, for one 
year, all full-time undergraduate students 
(enrolled for twelve semester credits or 
more) on the Amherst campus be required to 
live in on-campus residence halls during 
their freshman, sophomore, and junior years. 
Exemption from this requirement may be 
granted to the following: married students, 
veterans, students living in and commuting 
from the home of their parent (s) or guardians 



4 643 



Executive 
6-4-75 



4 6 44 



Executive 
6-4-75 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

while in attendance at the University, and 
resident members of fraternities or soror- 
ities at the Amherst campus. 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees , that 
effective the fall semester, 1975, for one 
year, all full-time undergraduate students 
(enrolled for twelve semester credits or 
more) on the Amherst campus be required to 
subscribe to a boarding plan in the campus 
dining commons during their freshman, 
sophomore, and junior years. Exemption 
from this requirement may be granted to 
the following: married students, veterans, 
students living in and commuting from the 
home of their parent (s) or guardian while in 
attendance at the University, and resident 
members of fraternities or sororities at the 
Amherst campus. 

There was no further business to come before the Com- 
mittee, and the meeting was adjourned at 2:30 p.m. 



QladysljKeith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

June 18, 1975; 1:00 p.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Troy; Trustees Croce, 
Rothenburger , and Winthrop; Mr. Callahan representing 
Trustee Anrig; Ms. Flannery representing Trustee Bicknell; 
Secretary Hardy; Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice President 
for Academic Affairs 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Alfange, Acting Vice 
Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Gluck- 
stern, Special Executive Assistant to the Chancellor for 
Academic Affairs; Professor Fletcher, Faculty Representa- 
tive 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Babcock, Acting Vice 
Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost; Professor 
Gagnon, Faculty Representative 

UM/Worcester : Acting Dean Butcher; Dr. Smith, Associate 
Dean for Academic Affairs and Provost; Dr. Wheeler, Chief 
of Surgery 

Guest: Joanne Pearlman from UM/Amherst 



The meeting was called to order at 1:05 p.m. Chairman Troy 
welcomed Trustee Winthrop to his first meeting as a member of the 
Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy, and Trustee Winthrop 
expressed his pleasure at joining the Committee. 

The Chairman directed the Committee's attention to the 
first item on the agenda, Tenure Appointments for UM/Amherst and UM/ 
Boston (Docs. T75-151, T75-152) . At the request of the Chairman, 
Vice President Lynton provided the rationale for these appointments, 
which were in addition to those confirmed by the Trustees at their 
May meeting (Docs. T75-088, T75-107, T75-108) . Nine cases in three 
categories were being presented from the Amherst campus. Three had 
been delayed for technical reasons, two had been held by the Presi- 
dent for further clarification from the campus which had since been 
supplied, and four had been held by the Chancellor for further 
review and discussion prior to submitting his recommendation. 

In the case of the four additional Boston appointments, 
two had been delayed by the President pending further information 
from the campus which had since been supplied and one had been 



4 6 45 



Welcome to 
Trustee Winthrop 



UM/Amherst and 
UM/Boston — 
Tenure Appoint- 
ments 

(Docs. T75-151, 
T75-152) 



4 6 46 



F & EP Coram. 
6-18-75 



COMMITTEE 



Executive 
Session 



Tenure Grievance 
Procedure 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

initially disapproved by the President who, as a result of addi- 
tional evidence of scholarly strength, had changed his decision. 
One case had been deferred because the candidate's tenure decision 
year was 1976-1977. However, on advice of Counsel Searson pro- 
vided at Chairman Troy's request, the President had reviewed the 
Chancellor's recommendation for tenure and arrived at a favorable 
decision. 

At 1:15, a motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To enter executive session for the purpose of 
discussing tenure cases. 

The executive session ended at 1:35. Upon motion made 
and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur 
with the President's appointments to tenure at 
the University of Massachusetts at Boston, as 
contained in Doc. T75-152. 

Professor Gagnon expressed the concern of some faculty 
members recommended for tenure but not acted on favorably by the 
President. It had been their understanding, according to Pro- 
fessor Gagnon, that in cases in which the campus recommendations 
were favorable at all levels but the President's decision was nega- 
tive, the individual would have an opportunity to present his or 
her case before the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy. 

Chairman Troy said that this was not a correct under- 
standing of Trustee policy. If the President, he explained, does 
not appoint a faculty member to tenure, that individual may file 
a grievance through the campus Tenure and Grievance Committee. 
If as a result of this process the President does not change his 
decision, the individual may ask for a review by the Committee on 
Faculty and Educational Policy. In view of the Trustees' official 
delegation to the President of the sole power to appoint to tenure, 
the action of the Committee in such a case would consist of a 
review of the written record of the case, after which it could 
either support the President's decision or request that he review 
it again. Chairman Troy emphasized that a personal appearance 
before the Committee by the individual was not a part of Trustee 
policy. 

Professor Gagnon said the individuals concerned were 
not clear about the role of the Tenure and Grievance Committee 
when the recommendations of the campus were uniformly favorable. 
What was the relationship, he asked, between the Tenure and 
Grievance Committee and the President's office? Chairman Troy 
replied that the individual would still have to follow the campus 
grievance route, and the campus could then ask the President to 
review his decision. 



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COMMITTEE 



1 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Vice President Lynton remarked that Counsel Searson's 
opinion of Trustee procedure in such matters had been sent, during 
the previous week, to the three persons involved and to Professor 
Gagnon. Professor Gagnon said he had not seen such a letter, but 
added that he had not been to his office. 

Professor Gagnon said he wished to express for the record 
the concern of the faculty and their wish that, if the three cases 
come before the Committee, members of the faculty be given the 
opportunity to contribute to the discussion. He also said the 
written record to be reviewed by the Committee on Faculty and 
Educational Policy could presumably be supplemented by any interested 
party. Mr. Lynton said, however, that the record would consist of 
that information upon which the grievance was lodged, not on sub- 
sequent information not concurrent with the grievance. Professor 
Gagnon observed that the written record which would come before 
the Committee would presumably include any legitimate added infor- 
mation, since this added information would also have been reviewed 
by the President. 

Mr. Lynton pointed out that the President had accepted 
for his review additional information about these cases through 
the week of June 12. All of the additional information had become 
part of the written record. It would be this complete record which 
would constitute the basis of any grievance, he said, not any fur- 
ther information, except the result of hearings by the Tenure and 
Grievance Committee. 

At Acting Dean Butcher's request, the Chairman next 
turned to the Worcester matters, taking first the Progress Report 
on Departmental Organization. Acting Dean Butcher said this list 
was merely a progress report, not a formal proposal for Committee 
action which, he said, would be more appropriately submitted by 
the new Dean. Dr. Butcher explained that the contemplated 28 
departments constituted a much smaller total than had been planned 
earlier. There were no longer to be divisions within the Medical 
School, he added, but departments only. 

A discussion ensued about the reasons for setting up 
some disciplines as separate departments while including others 
within departments. Mr. Lynton observed that, as in arts and 
sciences, it was necessary to strike a balance between too much 
consolidation and too much fragmentation. Ms. Flannery asked what 
designation was given to the specialties within departments, and 
Dr. Butcher said they were called "sections." 

Turning to the proposed Establishment of a Department 
of Anesthesiology at UM/Worcester (Doc. T75-150) , Chairman Troy 
called upon Dr. Wheeler. Referring to Ms. Flannerys ' suggestion 
during the preceding discussion that Anesthesiolgy should be in- 
cluded within the Department of Surgery, Dr. Wheeler said this 
would be poorly advised for several reasons. Anesthesiology is 



4 6 47 



F & EP Comm, 
6-18-75 



UM/Worcester — 

Departmental 

Organization 



UM/Worcester — 
Establishment 
of a Department 
of Anesthesiology 
(Doc. T75-150) 



4 6 48 



F & EP 
6-18-75 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Worcester — 
New Appointment 
with Tenure 
(Doc. T75-149) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

a separate department in most American medical schools, he said, and 
this is wise in reocgnition of its major and heavy responsibilities. 
In addition, this is a field in which it is extremely difficult to 
recruit outstanding persons and, if the discipline were to be a 
section within another department, it might become impossible. 
Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees establish 
a Department of Anesthesiology at the University 
of Massachusetts at Worcester, as set forth in 
Doc. T75-150. 

Ms. Flannery opposed the motion upon the instruction of 
Trustee Bicknell because, she said, he needed more time for a 
review and because he believed that Anesthesiology should not be 

a separate department. 

m 

The next item was a proposed New Appointment with Tenure 
at UM/Worcester (Doc. T75-149) . Mr. Lynton said that by an over- 
sight the letters of recommendation for the candidate had not been 
provided in advance of the meeting, and he pointed out that they 
were before the Committee now. Dr. Smith said he felt certain 
that the letters would confirm his view that this was an out- 
standing candidate who excelled in both clinical practice and 
teaching. He added the view that Dr. Wheeler had done a commendable 
job in recruiting him. 

Ms. Flannery said she wished to express the concern of 
Trustee Bicknell about a conversation that she, Ms. Flannery, had 
had with Mr. Lynton that morning. She reported that when she had 
expressed concern about not receiving letters of reference for the 
candidate, Mr. Lynton had told her the assurance of quality was a 
matter of professional judgement which is primarily a faculty and 
administrative responsibility. She said she had expressed the 
view that credentials were important to the Committee's discussions 
The Trustees, she said, should be the ultimate quality assurers, 
and should receive letters of reference as a matter of course. 

Chairman Troy remarked that in his years as Chairman of 
the Committee he had been extremely pleased with the fullness of 
documentation which normally comes from the Medical School, and 
that over the years he had been extremely impressed with the 
solidity and distinction of the Medical School appointments. 

Speaking of the specific appointment, Ms. Flannery said 
that Trustee Bicknell viewed this appointment, based upon the pub- 
lication list alone, as possibly not comparable to other appoint- 
ments previously made at the level of department chairman. She 
suggested that the Medical School might be rushing to appoint a 
chairman so that the Department of Anesthesiology may open in the 
fall. Trustee Bicknell wished, she said, to table this appoint- 
ment until he had had time to review it adequately in view of 
his belief that the Department of Anesthesiology was not necessary 
for the opening of the hospital. 



1 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Acting Dean Butcher said he took strong exception to Ms. 
Flannery's remarks. This appointment was the choice of the Execu- 
tive Committee of the Medical School faculty, and he said the 
letters of reference would confirm that this candidate was highly 
recommended by eminent persons. 

Mr. Lynton said that, while clearly the Trustees have the 
ultimate responsibility for everything that happens in the Univer- 
sity including the quality of appointments, the Trustees have wisely 
used that responsibility with great restraint. The Trustees have 
never before issued a direct challenge to the professional judgment 
of the administration of the University. He described Ms. Flannery's 
remarks as such a challenge, and expressed his strong opposition 
to it. 

Mr. Callahan asked if there had been opposition to the 
appointment on the part of the members of the faculty Executive 
Committee, and Dr. Butcher replied that it had been a unanimous 
choice. Dr. Wheeler provided further information from his own 
involvement with the candidate and emphasized his view of his 
great strength and suitability for the position. 

Trustee Croce expressed the view that the appointment was 
a strong one. He added that he thought the Search Committee had 
done its work well, and said he did not believe the hospital should 
open without a Department of Anesthesiology. It was moved, seconded, 
and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur with 
the President's appointment of Dr. Michael d'Arcy 
Stanton-Hicks as Professor of Anesthesiology with 
tenure at the University of Massachusetts at Wor- 
cester, as set forth in Doc. T75-149. 

Ms. Flannery abstained. 

Chairman Troy observed that the remainder of the agenda 
pertained to the Amherst campus, and the Worcester representatives 
were excused at their request. Chairman Troy began by pointing 
out that Mr. Gluckstern was making his final official appearance 
before the Committee, and he said this was a personal loss to him- 
self and to others. He wished Mr. Gluckstern well in his new posi- 
tion in Maryland. 

Chairman Troy turned to two related Amherst matters, the 
Establishment of a Department of Professional Preparation in 
Physical Education and Dance (Doc. T75-143) and the Establishment 
of a Department of Sports Studies (Doc. T75-142) . Mr. Gluckstern 
said there was little to add to the documentation, and outlined 
some of the details on the ongoing reorganization in these areas. 
There was a brief discussion, after which it was moved, seconded, anc 



4 6 49 



F & EP 
6-18-75 



UM/Amherst — 
Establishment 



of 


Departments 


of 


Professional 


Pre 


;paration 


anc 


Dance and 


Sports Studies 



(Docs. T75-143, 
T75-142) 



4 6 50 



F. & EP 
6-18-75 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Amherst — 
Terminal Exten- 
sion of MBA Pro- 
gram in Greece 
(Doc. T75-146) 



UM/Amherst — 
Extension of 
University With- 
out Walls 
(Doc. T75-147) 



UM/Amherst — 
New Appointment 
with Tenure 
(Doc. T75-148) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees estab- 
lish a Department of Professional Preparation in 
Physical Education and Dance at the University 
of Massachusetts at Amherst, as set forth in 
Doc. T75-142. 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees estab- 
lish a Department of Sports Studies at the 
University of Massachusetts at Amherst, as set 
forth in Doc. T75-142. 

The Chairman turned to the proposed Terminal Extension 
of the MBA Program in Greece (Doc. T75-146) . There was no objec- 
tion and upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees grant 
a terminal extension to the "Memorandum of 
Agreement: Pierce College (Athens, Greece) 
and the University of Massachusetts (Amherst)", 
(Doc. T75-039) through August 31, 1976, as set 
forth in Doc. T75-146. 

Turning then to the proposed Extension of the Univer- 
sity Without Walls at UM/Amherst (Doc. T75-147) , Chairman Troy 
called upon Mr. Lynton, who informed the Committee that the pro- 
gram had been initially created for a three-year period, after 
which a review was to take place to determine whether it should 
continue. Since that review had not been completed, he said, 
the Faculty Senate had voted a one-year extension for which 
Trustee approval was now requested. Upon motion which was made 
and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees extend 

the mandate of operation of the University With- 
out Walls through June 1976 as set forth in 
Doc. T75-147. 

The next matter was a proposed New Appointment with 
Tenure at UM/Amherst (Doc. T75-148) . Mr. Lynton described the 
candidate as an extraordinary individual of great distinction 
whom many consider to be worthy of a Nobel Prize. A motion was 
made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur 
with the President's appointment of Dr. Thomas 
Gold as Professor of Physics and Astronomy with 
tenure at the University of Massachusetts at 
Amherst, as set forth in Doc. T75-148. 

The final item on the agenda was a proposed Establish - 
ment of a Department of Communications Disorders in the School 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

of Health Sciences at UM/Amherst (Doc. T75-141) . This was des- 



COMMITTEE 



cribed as basically an administrative transfer of an established 
area, but the elevation to the level of a Department required 
Trustee approval. After a brief discussion it was moved, seconded, 
and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees estab- 
lish a Department of Communications Disorders 
in the School of Health Sciences at the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts at Amherst, as set forth 
in Doc. T75-141. 

There was no further business and the meeting adjourned 
at 2:45 p.m. 



4 6 5 1 



F & EP Comm. 
6-18-75 

UM/Amherst — 
Establishment 



I 



I 



(JladysJ Keith Hardy Q 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



of 


Department 


of 


Communications 


Disorders 


in the 


School of 


Health 



Sciences 
(Doc. T75-141) 



4652 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Amherst — 
Proposed Policy 
Concerning 
Mount Lincoln 
(Doc. T75-158) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

June 24, 1975; 10:00 a.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Knowles, President 

Wood; Trustees Shearer and Spiller; Secretary Hardy, Trea- 
surer Johnson; Miss Eichel, recorder 

Office of the President : Mrs. Robinson, Vice President 
for Planning; Mr. Post, Assistant Vice President for 
Physical Planning; Mr. Stephenson, Staff Associate, 
Planning Office; Mr. Bench, Assistant Counsel 

UM/Amherst : Dr. Gage, Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs 
Mr. Littlefield, Director of Planning 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Rawn, Assistant Chan- 
cellor for Community Affairs and Physical Planning; Mr. 
Meehan, Planning Director; Professor Gagnon, Faculty 
Representative 

UM/Worcester : Dr. Butcher, Acting Dean; Mr. Greig, 
Director of the Physical Plant; Dr. Chlapowski, Depart- 
ment of Biochemistry 

Invited Guests : Mr. George Pumphret , Chairman, Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts Building Authority; Mr. Michael 
McKinnell of Kallmann & McKinnell, Architects; Mr. James 
Alexander of Anderson, Notter Associates, Architects; 
Mr. Charles Gwathmey of Gwathmey Sigel, Architects; 
Mr. Harold Roth of Roth & Moore, Architects 



I 



The meeting was called to order at 10:00 a.m. by Chairman 



Knowles. 



Chairman Knowles asked the Committee to consider first 
Agenda Item 4, the delegation of authority for access to Mount 
Lincoln, UM/Amherst as detailed in Proposed Policy Concerning 
Mount Lincoln (Doc. T75-158) . At the request of the Chairman, 
Vice President Robinson explained that the Amherst campus re- 
ceived frequent requests from agencies desiring to set up re- 
ceiving and transmitting equipment on Mount Lincoln and that per- 
mission had been granted to one agency (Department of Public Works) 
at the last meeting of the Committee. She said the proposed policy 
would enable the Chancellor to handle these requests and grant per- 
mission to governmental agencies at his discretion. There being 
no opposition to the proposed policy, on motion made and seconded, 
it was 



I 



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1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees authorize 
the Chancellor of the Amherst campus, at his dis- 
cretion, or those designated by him, to prepare 
the necessary instruments to authorize govern- 
mental agencies to enter upon the land of the 
University at Mount Lincoln in Hampshire County 
for the purpose of installing and maintaining 
receiving and/or transmitting electronic equip- 
ment; further, to recommend that the Treasurer 
of the University be empowered and authorized 
to execute all instruments for and in behalf 
of the Trustees of the University in further- 
ance of these matters. 

Chairman Knowles next asked the Committee to consider the 
proposed revised Motor Vehicle Rules and Regulations , UM/Amherst 
(Doc. T75-155) . Vice Chancellor Gage explained the modifications 
to the existing rules and regulations, saying that they were minor 
changes, chiefly intended for clarification. He said the changes 
included a reduction in penalty fees for some of the offenses and 
greater control over some of the parking lots. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the Motor Vehicle Rules and Regulations, UM/ 
Amherst, as set forth in Doc. T75-155. 

Chairman Knowles asked Mr. Littlefield to review the pro- 
posed Purchase of the Marine Science Station at Hodgkins Cove , 
Gloucester (Doc. T75-157) . Mr. Littlefield explained that the 
University had capital funding to acquire the land, to construct 
a marine science facility and to renovate some of the present 
buildings. 

Treasurer Johnson reviewed, at the request of Chairman 
Knowles, the history of the acquisition of the Marine Station proper- 
ty by the University of Massachusetts Foundation. He said that at 
the time the property was first considered for use as a Marine Sta- 
tion, it had been impossible to purchase it with state funds. The 
Foundation had, therefore, purchased the property with the assurance 
of financial assistance from the Board of Trustees. The Treasurer 
also pointed out that there is considerable legal work to be done 
before the purchase can be completed. It was then moved, seconded 
and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

Treasurer Kenneth W. Johnson be empowered to 
obtain an appraisal or appraisals and to pur- 
chase on behalf of the University the premises 
consisting of the land and buildings in Glou- 
cester, Essex County, Massachusetts, and known 



^ 



4653 



B & G Comm. 
6-24-75 






UM/Amherst — 
Motor Vehicle 
Rules and 
Regulations 
(Doc. T75-155) 



Marine Science 
Station, Hodgkins 
Cove, Gloucester 



Purchase of 
Property 
(Doc. T75-057) 



4 6 54 



B & G Comm. 
6-24-75 



COMMITTEE 



Use for Overflow 

Parking 

(Doc. T75-156) 



UM/Worcester — 
Proposed Parking 
Garage 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

as the Marine Station, Hodgkins Cove, Gloucester, 
Massachusetts. Said premises shall be purchased 
from the present owner, University of Massachu- 
setts Foundation, Inc. The purchase price shall 
be the balance of the outstanding mortgage owed 
to the present mortgagee, the Union National 
Bank of Lowell, as of the date of taking title. 
The Treasurer shall be further authorized to 
take such further action as is necessary to 
complete the purchase. 

Chairman Knowles next asked for action by the Committee 
on the Request to Board of Trustees by the Gloucester Community 
Development Corporation for Permission to Use Part of the Marine 
Station, Gloucester, Property for Overflow Parking (Doc. T75-156) . 
Chairman Knowles said that the purpose of this request was to make 
it possible for approximately ten cars to be parked on the Marine 
Station Property a maximum of three days a month, while the owners 
were attending the Alternate Education Center nearby. The docu- 
ment, said Chairman Knowles, contains restrictions limiting the 
use of the property except for the purpose specified. After 
brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees recommend 
to the University of Massachusetts Foundation 
that permission be given to the Gloucester Com- 
munity Development Corporation to allow the 
parking of automobiles of those in attendance 
at alternate educational activities of the 
Corporation as given in Trustee Document T75- 
156 with the reservations recorded therein. 

Chairman Knowles next welcomed Mr. George Pumphret, Chair- 
man of the University of Massachusetts Building Authority, and Mr. 
Michael McKinnell, architectural consultant for the proposed park- 
ing garage. At the request of the Chairman, President Wood re- 
viewed the background of this proposal. He said the subject of 
a garage to be built in connection with the Medical Center has 
been discussed over a considerable period of time and that the 
present recommendation is an attempt to reconcile the desire of 
the Worcester campus personnel to keep the fees modest and the 
desire of the Building Authority to ensure that the garage will 
be self-liquidating. At the request of the President, Vice Presi- 
dent Robinson reviewed the major points of the analysis prepared 
for the Committee, Parking Garage at UMass/Worcester , Analysis 
and Recommendations (Doc. T75-160) : 1) the possibility of 
phased construction, with its effect on the fee schedule and 
general cash flow; 2) the assumption of cost sharing between the 
Medical Center and the Garage on the grounds that the garage is 
an essential part of the operation of the Center; and 3) construc- 
tion cost reduction through the elimination of roof screening. 
The analysis concluded with a recommendation that Phases I and II 
be built initially and that Phase III be added at such time as it 



I 



I 



I 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

becomes necessary to meet the parking demand. Trustee Spiller 
asked if he was correct in his understanding that the proposed 
initial parking fees would be $3/month for students and employees 
and $8/month for faculty and staff, increasing over time to approxi- 
mately $6.50 and $18 respectively if all three phases are constructed 
and remaining at $4 and $8 if the third phase does not go ahead. 
He was assured that this was correct. Trustee Spiller then asked 
if the Worcester campus personnel had agreed to this fee structure. 
President Wood said that he had just received that morning a letter 
from Acting Dean Butcher suggesting three modifications to the 
recommendations of the Planning Office, including smaller fees. 
Trustee Spiller then moved that the vote be postponed until such 
time as the problem of fees could be resolved. Mr. Pumphret re- 
minded the Committee of the Authority's continuing concern regard- 
ing the financial viability and said that he would recommend that 
the Building Authority not authorize construction of the garage 
until such time as the Board of Trustees would guarantee the 
financing. At this point, he and Mr. McKinnell left the meeting. 

President Wood asked for discussion of Trustee Spiller 's 
motion to postpone the vote. With the consent of the Chairman, he 
explained that the proposed vote did not establish fees or fore- 
close further modifications of the design or the construction 
schedule. The vote is simply to recommend that the Building Autho- 
rity seek necessary legislative authority to operate in Worcester 
and proceed with detailed planning and design. He noted that, at 
the present time, the Building Authority is restricted to operating 
in Amherst and Hadley. President Wood asked Trustee Spiller if 
the intent of his motion was to table the building of the garage 
or merely the matter of the fee schedule. Trustee Spiller said 
that his concern was with the fee schedule and he withdrew his 
motion to table the vote. The President then moved and it was 
seconded and 

VOTED: To recommend that the Board of Trustees request 
that the University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority seek legislative authority to finance 
and build a parking garage at the University of 
Massachusetts/Worcester, said project to be 
based on the feasibility study prepared by the 
Authority, dated March 1975, modified as rec- 
ommended in the report and subsequent final 
specific recommendations from the Planning Office. 

At the request of Chairman Knowles , Mrs. Robinson intro- 
duced discussion of the revised schematic/preliminary drawings for 
Building 120 - Harbor Campus , UM/Boston (Doc. T75-159) . She said 
this was the next step in the on-going plans for the gymnasium and 
that approval of the revised schematic/preliminary plans is required 
in order to develop drawings and solicit bids for construction of 
the foundations. Mrs. Robinson said that the revised plans call 
for the relocation of offices from the plaza to the 24 level; 
incorporation of space under the garage ramp to provide storage 



4 655 



B & G Comm. 
6-24-75 



UM/Boston — 
Building 120 
(Gymnasium) Ap- 
proval of Re- 
vised Schematic/ 
Preliminary 
Plans 
(Doc. T75-159) 



4656 



B & G Comm. 
6-24-75 



COMMITTEE 



Kennedy Library 



UM/Boston — 
Calf Pasture 
Pumping Station 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

and a weight room; reorientation of ground level and com- 
munity access from the northwest corner to the eastern face of 
the gymnasium; and provision of a gallery which will provide 
pedestrian cover, offer circulation space during spectator events 
and permit a possible future walkway extension to the pumping 
station. Mr. James Alexander of Anderson Notter Associates, 
Architects, commented briefly on the revised plans. In response 
to queries, he said that the interior seating capacity has not 
changed, and that the building is so designed that the pool can 
be made available without permitting access to the rest of the 
building. Trustee Spiller asked if the skating rink had been 
so designed that it could be used for purposes other than skating 
in the summer. The reply was that this is being studied. After 
further brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the preliminary plans for Building 120 (Gym- 
nasium) at University of Massachusetts/Boston 
dated June 12, 1975 (Doc. T75-159) and auth- 
orize preparation of working drawings including 
contract documents required for the construc- 
tion of the foundation and other necessary site- 
work for the project. This recommendation for 
approval is based upon assurances by the Archi- 
text to the Bureau of Building Construction that 
the total construction cost of the Building and 
associated outside landscaping and athletic faci- 
lities will be within the available funds of 
Eight Million Dollars ($8,000,000). 

Trustee Spiller raised the issue of the proposed site 
for the Kennedy Library, saying that the recent statement by the 
Kennedy Corporation which eliminated consideration of the Amherst 
campus site as a possible location made it possible for the Com- 
mittee on Buildings and Grounds to make a definitive recommenda- 
tion with regard to the Library. After brief discussion, it was 
moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To support President Wood and Chancellor Golino 
in their continuing efforts to bring the Kennedy 
Library complex to the UM/Boston Harbor Campus. 

Chairman Knowles turned next to the proposed plans for 
use of the Calf Pasture Pumping Station, UM/Boston, asking Chan- 
cellor Golino to introduce discussion of this project. The Chan- 
cellor said that UM/Boston campus personnel have been looking into 
possible uses for the Pumping Station, which is an architecturally 
impressive building adjacent to the Harbor Campus. He said the 
University has succeeded in obtaining a grant for a feasibility 
study on the adaptation of the building for use by both the campus 
and residents of adjacent neighborhoods. He said further that 
it has been possible to tie this building into plans for the gym- 
nasium and, therefore, into the total campus design. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



1 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chancellor Golino then asked Mr. Rawn to discuss the pro- 
posal in greater detail. Mr. Rawn said the station was built in 
1883 as the main facility for handling city sewage. It is now 
only used as an auxiliary facility but present plans call for this 
use to continue indefinitely. The feasibility study indicates 
that it would be possible to meet the Sewer Department's needs in 
an improved fashion while making 75 percent of the building avail- 
able for such uses as a campus bookstore, student organization 
offices, a theater, art and craft studios, and multi-purpose space 
for community and campus activities. He said there are four possible 
sources of funding for the facility: state capital outlay, self- 
amortizing bonds, City of Boston community development revenue 
sharing funds and historic preservation funds. He said that if the 
uses of this building are such that they can replace a portion of 
the program intended for Building 08/02, the arts and science 
building, then capital outlay funds might be used. Mr. Rawn asked 
Mr. Charles Gwathmey, whose firm conducted the study, to show the 
Committee a model of the building showing possible renovations. Mr, 
Gwathmey noted that there are many options for arranging the interior 
space. Trustee Knowles expressed her concern that the proposed 
pedestrian bridge would obscure the view of the arch of the building 
After further questions and discussion, Mr. Rawn noted that more 
detailed plans for the building would come to the Committee for ap- 
proval if adequate sources of funding are identified. In reply to 
a query from Trustee Spiller, Mr. Gwathmey estimated the cost of 
the project renovations, new construction and pedestrian bridge 
as outlined in the schematic drawings. 

At the conclusion of discussion of this project, Chairman 
Knowles asked Mrs. Robinson to review several informational items 
for the Committee. Mrs. Robinson said that the final environmental 
impact report on Phase II construction at UM/Boston had been ap- 
proved by the Office of Environmental Affairs and that construction 
could proceed within present appropriations. 

She further informed the Committee that the Fine Arts 
Center at UM/Amherst had been featured on the cover of the May 
1975 issue of Architectural Record (Vol. 157, No. 5). 

Mrs. Robinson then informed the Committee that Mr. Little- 
field and representatives of the President's Office had made a 
presentation to the BBC and Office of Administration and Finance 
regarding possible items to be included in an Emergency Capital Out- 
lay bill. These items included the campus safety program, redirec- 
tion of existing modular project funds, and additional site work 
and equipment funds for UM/Worcester . 

Mrs. Robinson also called attention to the report of the 
Management Task Force on Space Utilization set up by the President 
in April, 1974, entitled "Space Information Assignment and Analysis. 
She said the report had been distributed to the Committee for infor- 
mational purposes. She said the report was a first step in an 
effort to assure more effective space information and space use on 
each campus . 



4657 



B & G Comm. 
6-24-75 



■*oo 



UM/Boston — 
Phase II Ap- 
proved by Office 
of Environmental 
Affairs 



UM/Amherst — 
Fine Arts Center 



Emergency 
Capital Outlay 
Request 



Space Use Report 



4 6 58 



B & G Comm. 
6-24-75 

UM/Amherst — 
South Deerfield 
Right -of -Way 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Knowles next asked Mr. Littlefield to explain 
the issue of the right-of-way in South Deerfield. He said that 
there is an awkward intersection in the town of Deerfield which 
the town and the county wish to correct by widening the right-of- 
way and improving the intersection. To do this will involve the 
taking of approximately 2 \ acres of University-owned land which 
is not currently being used by the University. He said the Com- 
mittee would be asked at a later date to transfer this land. 

UM/Boston — At the request of Chairman Knowles, Mr. Post reviewed 

Use of 100 Arl- the status of Judge Garrity's court order that space be made 
ington Street by available for a 1500 pupil comprehensive high school at 100 
School Department!; Arlington Street. He said that the University and the Public 

Facilities Department, City of Boston agreed that the available 
space could not possibly accommodate that number of students and 
that Judge Garrity had the matter under study. 



Review of Build- 
ing Authority 
Projects 



UM/Worcester — 
Status of Site 
Work 



UM/Amherst — 
Commemorative 
Plaque on Till- 
son Power Plant 



UM/Boston — 

Sculpture 

Competition 



Mr. Post further reported that the President's Office 
would be conducting during the summer months a review of all 
University of Massachusetts Building Authority projects. The 
results of this review, he said, will be presented to the Trustees 
in the fall. 

Mr. Post informed the Committee that the BBC had 
allocated $500,000 for site work around the teaching hospital at 
UM/Worcester, but that estimates for the work have substantially 
exceeded this allocation. Therefore, the Planning Office is rec- 
ommending that the roadways, the outpatient and emergency parking 
lots and related site work be done at this time and that the mall 
and other landscaping be deferred and completed under a future 
contract. Trustee Spiller suggested that savings might be 
realized by substituting less expensive shrubbery and suggested 
that personnel from the UM/Amherst campus might be helpful in 
providing expertise and labor for the landscaping portion of 
this work. 

Mr. Littlefield also informed the Committee that a com- 
memorative plaque was being placed on the new Tillson Power Plant 
in memory of Lionel D. Paradis , the physical plant engineer who 
worked with the designers of the plant. In this connection, Chair- 
man Knowles asked Chancellor Golino what response he had received 
with regard to the use of memorial plaques at UM/Boston as a 
means of honoring students who had died while attending the Univer- 
sity. Chancellor Golino said that he had received no response to 
date. Chairman Knowles asked Chancellor Golino to follow up on 
this matter, which he agreed to do. 

Chairman Knowles then asked Mr. Rawn to review the pro- 
posed sculpture competition at UM/Boston. Mr. Rawn said that 
this competition has been organized by a student working with the 
Art Department. The total cost of the project is estimated to be 
$24,600, of which $15,000 would be awarded to the winning sculptor. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

he funding proposal has the following components: (1) $6,300 from 
the Student Activities Committee, (2) $6,300 from an as yet undeter- 
mined University source, and (3) $12,000 from the Mayor's Office of 
Cultural Affairs on a grant from the Massachusetts Council on the 
Arts. The Art Department, he said, is solidly behind the project, 
since the campus is barren of major artwork. The campus will work 
during the summer on clarifying the funding commitments. He added 
that the Buildings and Grounds Committee would determine the loca- 
tion of the winning sculpture. 

Chairman Knowles said the issue of naming buildings has 
been on several agendas, and she would like to see action taken to 
resolve this matter. Trustee Spiller suggested that a questionnaire 
might be circulated to the Trustees asking their preferences for 
criteria for naming buildings; that is, what kinds of names the 
Committee should be looking for. 



4 6 59 



B & G Comm, 
6-24-75 



Naming of 
Buildings 



There being no further business, the meeting adjourned at 



;.2:12 p.m. 



1 



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\ 



ladys vCeith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4 6 60 



COMMITTEE 



FY76 Operating 
Budget 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON THE BUDGET 

June 24, 1975; 11:00 a.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Carlson; President 
Wood; Trustees Robertson, Rothenburger , Troy; Secretary- 
Hardy; Ms. Judd, recorder 

Office of the President : Mr. lynton, Senior Vice President 
for Academic Affairs; Mr. Gartenberg, Budget Director; Mrs 
Hanson, Associate Budget Director 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Gulko , Budget 
Director; Professor Fletcher, Faculty Representative 

UM/Boston : Mr. Hamilton, Vice Chancellor for Administra- 
tion and Finance; Mr. Baxter, Budget Director; Professor 
Gagnon, Faculty Representative 

UM/Worcester : Acting Dean Butcher; Mr. Stockwell, Asso- 
ciate Dean for Administrative Affairs and Hospital 
Director; Mr. Cathey, Controller; Dr. Chlapowski, Depart- 
ment of Biochemistry 

The meeting was called to order at 11:15 a.m. Chairman 
Carlson asked President Wood to comment on the Governor's Budget 
Recommendations (House I) . After making general comments about the 
State's present fiscal status, he pointed out that the Governor's 
budget does not show a 10% across the board cut; further, the rec- 
ommendations for some of the major state government departments 
show a substantial increase. He said that it appears that the 
University has received the largest cut of all segments of higher 
education. As a result, he said, he will make a full presentation 
of the University's budget requests to the Legislature at the 
public hearings, therein to show the consequences of budget cuts 
and to demonstrate the integrity of the budget submitted by the 
University. 

The discussion then turned to the FY 1976 Operating Bud- 
get and the status of the budget request. Mr. Gartenberg commented 
on the Governor's recommendations in terms of its presentation and 
format, and pointed out that some of the figures for the University 
are misleading. He used as an example the moving of the Common- 
wealth's college library book program from the Board of Higher 
Education to the University's appropriation without notation, so 
that it appears as if the University's budget is $92.7 million 
when in fact it is $90.9 million. 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The picture for the University, he said, at a $90.9 million 
level is clearly bleak; austerity programs or position freezes can- 
not adequately meet a budget reduction of that magnitude. A variety 
of more drastic steps would have to be taken if that amount is to 
be finally enacted. In preparation for legislative action and in 
consideration of the full impact of the budget, a two-step program 
is being adopted. First, the austerity program which has been in 
effect for the last six months will be continued on a temporary 
basis and made more stringent. Second, the budget recommendations 
will be studied in more detail to determine the specific impact of 
those reductions on specific programs and use this information in 
preparation for the legislative hearing process. 

Mr. Gartenberg then referred to President Wood's June 23 
memorandum which outlined the impact of a $90.9 million budget on 
the University. He pointed out that the Governor's recommendations 
make no provision for the teaching hospital and that the Univer- 
sity would be unable to operate that facility on the funds provided. 
Overall, the effect, he said, would be detrimental to the long- 
range developmental plans for each of the campuses. 

Mr. Gartenberg said that the next identifiable operating 
level which could be considered is $103.9 million; this figure 
would exclude the teaching hospital which would be handled separately 
At this level, it would be possible to provide sufficient salary 
funds to meet the cost of currently authorized positions, meet the 
statutory commitments to classified employees to provide step rate 
increases, and provide sufficient funds to purchase fuel and 
utilities at current prices. It would not, however, be possible 
to provide for professional and faculty salary increases, to com- 
pensate for inflation in all non-personnel accounts and in fuel 
and utilities, and to continue important programs such as library 
acquisitions. 

He pointed out that a $109.4 million appropriation would 
permit the University to carry out its level of operation in 1976 
at the same level at which it operated in 1975, fully compensating 
for inflationary increases. This figure, again, would exclude 
the teaching hospital. Funds still would have to be provided for 
a number of crucial programs on all campuses, and this would have 
to be done by pursuing a number of short-term trade-offs between 
existing activities and developing activities. 

Turning to the teaching hospital budget, Mr. Gartenberg 
said that it had not been included in any of the plateau numbers 
referred to. The $6.9 million requested represents a very care- 
fully planned budget in terms of staffing, supplies, equipment 
and utilities. A $5.5 million level could be considered if the 
opening of the teaching hospital were delayed until late fall, if 
adjustments in hiring schedules were made, and if some marginal 
reductions were made in some of the non-personnel accounts on the 
campus. 



4661 



Budget Comm. 
6-24-75 



II 



4662 



Budget Comm. 
6-24-75 



COMMITTEE 



Report on Con- 
tinuation of the 
Austerity Program 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

After additional comments on the status of the budget 
request, Chairman Carlson said that he would like the Committee to 
receive a set of the possible alternatives for discussion by the 
Committee. With regard to the teaching hospital, he said, the 
alternatives are less numerous. 

Commenting on the austerity program, Chairman Carlson 
said that, in the event that the Commonwealth's fiscal situation 
continues in the future, long-term programmatic approaches should 
be considered now, so that short-term austerity can be phased out 
reasonably promptly. Programmatic options and alternatives on the 
campuses should be looked at in order to plan on a long-range basis 
Mr. Lynton pointed out that steps had been taken in that direction 
on the Amherst campus which will lead to an assessment of the 
complexities of academic programs and to the development of ob- 
jective criteria by which program decisions can be made. 

On the subject of professional and faculty salary increases 
Trustee Troy asked about the status of faculty salaries in other 
states. Mr. Gartenberg said that the relative status of the Univer- 
sity faculty has declined. Chairman Carlson said that under pre- 
sent economic conditions and present supply and demand for faculty 
members, as steady or as large increases as have been characteristic 
of higher education in the past cannot be expected. Mr. Lynton 
and Prof. Fletcher commented that the lack of salary adjustments 
and merit increases has had a negative impact on morale and re- 
cruitment and that an institution cannot be operated effectively 
without that kind of flexibility. Prof. Fletcher added that be- 
cause of reductions in support services and the position freeze, 
faculty morale on the Amherst campus has suffered. Mr. Gartenberg 
said, on the subject on continuation of the austerity program, 
that it would probably last through the summer at which point the 
overall restrictions will be released and replaced by a Trustee- 
approved plan for the operation of each campus. 

Mr. Gulko then spoke about the effects of the Governor's 
Budget Recommendations on the Amherst campus. He pointed out 
that those recommendations, when looked at by subsidiary account, 
fall below the FY 1974 level in almost every case. Reductions 
range as high as 37.7% in some accounts. He spoke about the 
effect the reductions would have on campus personnel, faculty, 
and student workers, and the very sizable impact on academic 
programs . 

Turning to the Boston campus, the Committee heard a re- 
port by Vice Chancellor Hamilton on the effects of the budget 
cuts. He said that the impact of the approximately $2 million 
cut is largely on the payroll account, and that the options for 
meeting that impact on the Boston campus are narrower than that 
of the Amherst campus since a wide variety of program options 
do not exist. On the subject of college development, he said 
that it was felt that Colleges III and IV must grow even at the 
expense of a rollback in Colleges I and II. Prof. Gagnon com- 
mented that it was the sense of the faculty that they were willing 



I 



I 



I 



II 



COMMITTEE 



I 



li 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

to take a proportion of what is to be done in the next few years, 
but were not willing to see Colleges III and IV grow at a pace that 
would cut Colleges I and II more than the overall cut asked for. 

In response to a question from Trustee Troy, Mr. Hamilton 
reported that, although position vacancy freezes equal to $700,000 
are already in effect on the Boston campus, additional freezes 
would have to be instituted, particularly in academic areas. This 
will have a severe effect on the teaching ratio. In light of this, 
said Chairman Carlson, the Trustees may have to reconsider enroll- 
ment goals because of fiscal constraints. 

Acting Dean Butcher spoke next on fiscal impacts on the 
Worcester campus. Referring to the FY 1975 appropriation of $6.3 
million, he pointed out that, adding the hospital positions which 
the Worcester campus was mandated to carry, the FY 1975 expenditures 
amounted to $7.2 million. This is the same figure recommended for 
FY 1976 by the Governor. In the absence of a budget for the teach- 
ing hospital, the House I recommendation for the Worcester campus 
therefore is not an increase. 

He reviewed some radical measures which would have to be 
taken if the campus were to meet its financial commitments in the 
next few months. In addition, he noted that the Medical School 
is already extremely understaffed and that some morale problems 
were beginning to appear for the first time. 

A discussion ensued on the lack of budget recommendations 
for the teaching hospital. President Wood said that, in part, the 
matter is a legal one and is in the hands of Counsel. Chairman 
Carlson added that it is a public commitment issue as well and 
that it calls for deliberation by the Legislature. 

Chairman Carlson then proposed that the Committee recommend 
that the Executive Committee pass a resolution with respect to 
the University's response to the Governor's Budget Recommendations; 
it was therefore moved, seconded, and 



4663 



Budget Comm, 
6-24-75 



VOTED : 



To support the sense of the following resolution: 



VOTED : The Executive Committee recognizes the 
serious fiscal condition of the Common- 
wealth. Nevertheless, the Executive Com- 
mittee has concluded that the implementa- 
tion of a budget for the University as in- 
cluded in the Governor's Budget Recommenda- 
tions (House I) will make the provision of 
quality education to a scheduled 30,638 
full time equivalent students an impossi- 
bility. Therefore, the President in con- 
sultation with the Chancellors is autho- 
rized to enter into discussion with the 



4 6 64 



Budget Comm. 
6-24-75 



COMMITTEE 



Allocation of 



Funds for 


Coopers 


& 


Lybrand 



(Doc. T75-162) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

appropriate executive and legislative 
agencies and is authorized to respond 
in the name of the University to those 
responsible proposals which reflect the 
needs of the University and the fiscal 
condition of the Commonwealth. 

The Committee then turned to the Allocation of Funds for 
Coopers & Lybrand (Doc. T75-162) . Mrs. Hanson presented the 
status of allocations to date, and after a motion was made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To authorize the transfer of $11,500 from 
Trustee Reserve to the Trust Fund Interest 
Account. These funds are to be used for 
payment to Coopers & Lybrand for services 
rendered . 

There being no further business, the meeting adjourned 
at 12:35 p.m. 



I 



6^La~X»*p MzJtC- U-e^-J 



^Gladys UCeith Hardy 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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COMMITTEE 



II 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON LONG-RANGE PLANNING 

June 24, 1975; 2:00 p.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Rowland, President 
Wood; Trustees Carlson, Robertson, Rothenburger ; Mr. 
Callahan representing Trustee Anrig; Secretary Hardy; 
Ms. Eichel, recorder 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice Presi- 
dent for Academic Affairs; Mr. Edelman, Vice President 
for University Policy; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for 
Planning; Mr. Cooley, Assistant Vice President for Analyt- 
ical Studies 



UM/Amherst 



Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Bischoff, Associate 
Chappell, Acting Dean of the Graduate School; 



Provost; Mr 

Professor Fletcher, Faculty Representative 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Babcock, Acting Vice 
Chancellor for Academic Affairs 

The meeting was called to order at 2:05 p.m. Chairman 
Rowland welcomed Trustee Rothenburger to the Committee. 

Chairman Rowland asked President Wood to introduce the 
first agenda item on enrollment planning at UM/Amherst. The Presi- 
dent said the Committee had considered a series of staff papers and 
campus responses with regard to enrollment guidelines for the Am- 
herst campus. He was gratified by the extensive campus involvement 
in this process. Action on the most recent campus proposals should, 
he suggested, await specific further work during the summer by the 
Chancellor's and the President's offices. He noted the criticality 
of this work in terms of the need for planning alternatives in this 
time of fiscal uncertainty. 

President Wood said primary initiative and responsibility 
for enrollment policy lies with the Board of Trustees and the cen- 
tral administration, although faculty and students' views should 
receive appropriate weight in the process of enrollment planning. 
He said the determination of enrollment goals for one campus should 
be done in the context of enrollment considerations for the total 
University and in terms of major program emphases and resource 
parameters. The work of this Committee over the past 18 months in 
reviewing issues of enrollment and student mix — in addition to the 
Committee's statement on enrollment at Boston — demonstrates the 
value of a central locus for this process. He said it is time to 
take some tentative cuts as to the nature of programs. As the 



4665 



UM/Amherst- 

Enrollment 

Planning 



4666 



Long-Range Plan, 
Comm. 6-24-75 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Committee considers these factors, he said, and review the highly- 
professional analysis and comments that have come from the Amherst 
campus, it must consider not only the total enrollment goals, but 
also the need for a statement about the commitment of the Univer- 
sity to graduate programs. 

President Wood said that it is important to emphasize 
that the University of Massachusetts is the public university of 
the Commonwealth with a national reputation for excellence in 
graduate departments and that a major investment has been made in 
a medical facility of high promise. He said the worth and ex- 
cellence of graduate programs will be a determining factor in 
maintaining the University's distinctive mission and role from 
that of the state and community colleges and in maintaining a 
sense of equality with the private sector of higher education. 
In emphasizing the importance of graduate education in the mission 
of the institution, the President further noted that decisions 
must be made about the kinds of graduate programs which should be 
offered in a highly technological society with a rapidly changing 
economy. 

In commenting on the Amherst proposal, the President said 
that it is forthright in its commitment to graduate programs as an 
essential benchmark of University character, but is less sensitive 
to issues of graduate reform in such matters as the character of 
credentialing, the character of instruction, the time for comple- 
tion of program, and what he termed the "guild" pattern of Ph.D. 
instruction, particularly in the arts and sciences. 

Most of the graduate programs authorized at UM/ Amherst, 
he said, have now reached a critical mass in size and the need now 
is for concentration on improving the quality of programs. He 
emphasized the need to identify programs that lack the potential 
for distinction and programs the demand for which other institu- 
tions in the area cannot meet and then to determine the total 
graduate program emphasis. He questioned the utility of some of 
the masters' programs in the arts and sciences which do not lead 
to doctoral programs. Although terminal master's degrees in pro- 
fessional studies are of value, he said, he did not feel this was 
necessarily the case in all of the arts and science fields. 

President Wood said that once these issues had been 
resolved for UM/Amherst, it would be necessary to consider how 
the development of graduate programs at UM/Boston would be affected 
He suggested, as examples, the following alternatives to the con- 
tinuation of on-campus incremental growth of existing graduate 
programs as a means of achieving program mix: dual degree pro- 
grams such as engineering and business, business and law, business 
and resource development; three-year programs which provide a 
master's degree, beginning at the junior level; and off-campus 
programs that meet the criteria of demand, utility and effective- 
ness. Off-campus programs, he said, provide a means of increasing 
the number of students for sound educational reasons, not merely 
to combat adverse impact of enrollment on the surrounding com- 
munities. In time of tight money, he added, cost effectiveness of 

programs becomes a major consideration. 



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COMMITTEE 



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4667 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Programmatic alternatives must be explored, he said. 
Should we continue certain liberal arts graduate programs? Should 
one of the new directions of the School of Education be the up- 
grading of community college faculty and programs? Other kinds of 
thinking must take place about graduate programs, he suggested, and 
this kind of planning must take place in association with ultimate 
numbers of students in order to develop the program options needed 
in achieving optimal mileage in budgeting and the wise allocation 
of resources. 

President Wood informed the Committee that the Planning 
Office had prepared, for discussion purposes only, tables showing 
various options with regard to headcount and FTE enrollments both 
on and off campus. He concluded his remarks with the statement 
that he would come back to the Committee with proposals for en- 
rollment guidelines. 

At Chairman Rowland's request, Chancellor Bromery men- 
tioned several factors which must be considered in providing off- 
campus programs: logistics, quality control and the residency 
requirement. He stated his concern that degrees given for off- 
campus programs be equal in quality to those for on-campus programs, 
and mentioned the need to consider the effect on dormitory occupancy, 

Discussion ensued about how changes in student mix would 
affect the campus, and how the varying costs of the different pro- 
grams could be determined. Vice President Lynton explained that, 
while master's level programs were moderately more expensive than 
upper-level undergraduate programs, a minimum enrollment of approxi- 
mately 20 to 25 students in any one program may be necessary to 
make it cost effective. Doctoral programs, on the other hand, are 
considerably more expensive. 

A discussion followed as to the proper goals and respon- 
sibilities of the University with regard to the education of the 
residents of the Commonwealth. Should it provide in-service 
training for private and public enterprises, for either or both? 
How far should the University go in providing intellectual enrich- 
ment for the citizenry? The desirability of cooperative ventures 
between campuses of the University, between the University and 
other institutions of higher learning in the area, and between 
the University and industry was explored. 

The question arose as to whether off-campus programs 
might lead to the relocation of faculty and eventually to mini- 
campuses. The President said that it is important to specify that 
no capital outlay will be considered. 

President Wood summarized the discussion by saying that 
whereas growth may be necessary on both campuses, at Amherst the 
emphasis should be on the quality of programs rather than on growth 
and that campus planning personnel should be looking at the various 



Long-Range Plan. 
Comm. 6-24-75 



4 6 68 



Long-Range Plan, 
Comm. 6-24-75 



COMMITTEE 

UM/Boston — 
Development of 
Priorities 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

options which can be taken depending upon the amount of resources 
that become available. 

Chairman Rowland then turned the discussion to the 
development of priorities at UM/Boston. She referred the Com- 
mittee members to the document before them which outlined the 
priorities set forth by the Committee after discussions with 
Chancellor Golino concerning his report, which was circulated 
to the Committee at the May meeting. Both Chancellor Golino and 
Mr. Babcock indicated that they were satisfied with the proposed 
policy statement. Chancellor Golino said he was in agreement with 
the Committee that undergraduate programs were of first import- 
ance and that all programs should go forward within the constraints 
of the budget. It was moved and seconded and 



I 



VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees: 

— Commend the serious and important work of the 
New Directions Committee and the University 
Assembly of the University of Massachusetts at 
Boston under the coordination of the Chancellor, 
and: 



— While welcoming the continued development and 
evaluation of their recommendations for campus 
policy and programs, adopt the following policy 
statement on priorities for the University of 
Massachusetts at Boston: 



I 



Throughout its brief history, the University of Massachusetts at 
Boston has attempted to respond to a variety of often conflicting 
ideas with regard to programmatic direction, admissions policies 
and resource allocations. Current fiscal constraints make it 
clear that these conflicts cannot be resolved by pursuing an 
ever-widening agenda of commitments. Hard choices will have to 
be made with regard to the use of increasingly limited resources. 
In this context and with fresh acknowledgement of the continued 
importance of the University throughout the state and within the 
Boston urban area the Board of Trustees adopts the following 
priorities for the University of Massachusetts/Boston: 

1) Contirvue^d undergraduate growth within the Board of Trustees' 

June 1974 enrollment guidelines and ceiling in order to ensure: 

a) Broad educational opportunity for the people of metro- 
politan Boston and adjacent communities; 



b) additional program diversity through the continued 
growth of Colleges II and IV and development of a 
range of relevant professional program options; 



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COMMITTEE 



II 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

c) maximum effective use of existing capital investment 
and consequent decreased costs per student in a time 
of constrained resources; 

d) an appropriate commitment to part-time and non-tradi- 
tional students, including development of an extended 
day program. 

2) Effective and increased access not only through program growth 
and diversification but through active recruitment, and adequate 
counseling, testing, support services, basic skills programs 
and financial aid. 

3) Gradual development of selected graduate programs consistent 
with the achievement of priorities 1 and 2 and within the con- 
text of an approved campus-wide plan and University-wide 
priorities and needs. 

At the request of Chairman Rowland, Mrs. Robinson reviewed 
for the Committee the contents of the planning notebooks which had 
been distributed. 

Chairman Rowland then asked Mr. Cooley to present an over- 
view of a model for contingency planning. Mr. Cooley began with 
a brief review of the basic purpose and outcomes of the February 
planning exercise. He stressed that it was becoming increasingly 
important for the University to be able to formulate and examine 
contingency options as part of its planning process. In conjunc- 
tion with the February planning exercise, Dr. Warren Gulko and his 
staff developed a small planning model which could be very useful 
to the University's future planning efforts. Mr. Cooley then pre- 
sented an example of how this model could be used to examine the 
short and long term effects of change in resources, enrollments, 
faculty workloads and programs. A brief discussion then took 
place as to how this model could be of assistance to the Committee 
in its long range planning deliberations. 



1 



4:00 p.m. 



There being no further business, the meeting adjourned at 



Qladyi) Keith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4 6 69 



Long-Range Plan, 
Comm. 6-24-75 



4 6 70 



COMMITTEE 



Executive 
Session 

UM/Worcester — 
Group Practice 
Rules and 
Regulations 
(Docs. T75-144 
T75-161) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

June 25, 1975; 11:00 a.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Healey; President 

Wood; Trustees Bicknell, Croce, Carlson, Gordon, Rowland, 
Troy, and Weldon; Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; 
Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice Presi- 
dent for Academic Affairs; Mr. Edelman, Vice President for 
University Policy; Mr. Gartenberg, Budget Director; Mr. 
O'Leary, Assistant Counsel 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino 

UM/Worcester : Acting Dean Butcher; Mr. Stockwell, Asso- 
ciate Dean for Administrative Affairs and Hospital 
Director; Dr. Wheeler, Chairman of Department of Sur- 
gery and Hospital Chief of Staff 

Guests : Ms. Ellen Flannery, Special Assistant to Com- 
missioner Bicknell; Ms. Dorothy Jones, Assistant Secre- 
tary of Educational Affairs 

The meeting was called to order at 11:00 a.m. Upon 
motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To enter executive session to discuss the Hay 
Report. 

The executive session ended at 1:05 p.m. Chairman Healey 
turned to the second item on the agenda, the proposed Group Prac- 
tice Rules and Regulations for clinical faculty at UM/Worcester 
(Docs. T75-144, T75-161) . At the Chairman's request, Vice President 
Edelman explained that he had met with Trustee Bicknell after the 
June 4 Executive Committee meeting and said changes in the plan had 
been worked out which he believed were acceptable to both Trustee 
Bicknell and the Executive Office of Human Services. All the 
changes were also acceptable to the Medical School and to counsel, 
he said, and were not of a fundamental nature. Trustee Bicknell 
remarked that his office and representatives of the Medical School 
had worked well together in making these changes, and he said it 
would be imprudent to delay action any further. He said he en- 
dorsed the plan fully. Upon motion made and seconded, it was 



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COMMITTEE 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To approve and adopt the rules and regulations 
for the University of Massachusetts Medical 
School Group Practice (T75-144) , as amended by 
memorandum dated June 20, 1975 (T75-161) , 
effective June 29, 1975. The interim guide- 
lines for the Group Practice (T75-065A) and 
the interim guide on salaries for the Group 
Practice (T75-013) are repealed effective 
June 29, 1975. 

VOTED: To endorse, support, and encourgae the develop- 
ment of clinical care and teaching relationships 
between the Medical School and relevant state 
institutions, including but not limited to those 
under the Executive Office of Human Services, 
such relationships to include the appointment 
of qualified clinical personnel from Human 
Services and other appropriate institutions 
to the faculty of the Medical School in ac- 
cordance with established University procedures 
for faculty appointments. 

Chairman Healey next turned to Mr. Gartenberg to explain 
a change in the Personnel Policy for Nonacademic Staff (Doc. T7 3- 
090R) . Mr. Gartenberg explained that the uncertain budgetary 
situation made necessary the temporary suspension of the portion 
of the policy relating to multi-year contracts. Until the bud- 
getary situation, both long-term and short-term, could be clari- 
fied, nonacademic professional staff would receive one-year 
contracts. A motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To suspend those provisions set forth in the 
Personnel Policy for Professional Nonacademic 
Staff (T73-090R) concerning multi-year contracts. 

Chairman Healey called on Trustee Carlson, Chairman of 
the Budget Committee, to report on the meeting of June 24 and its 
discusssion of the FY 1976 Operating Budget. Mr. Gartenberg had 
briefed the Budget Committee, said Trustee Carlson, on the serious 
consequences of the Governor's proposed budget for the University, 
particularly the lack of a funding recommendation for the teaching 
hospital. The Budget Committee had voted, as a result of this 
information, to recommend that the Executive Committee empower 
the President to engage in conversations with the executive and 
legislative branches of state government to devise means to 
forestall these consequences. 

Chairman Healey said he believed this vote carried out 
the sense of what the Trustees wished to achieve: a balance 
between the needs of the University and the fiscal condition of 
the Commonwealth. He expressed the hope that some accommodation 
could be worked out which would be acceptable to the executive 
and legislative branches of state government and to those charged 





4671 




Executive 
6-25-75 




'■■' :: " ;; - 


s 




e 





Change in Per- 
sonnel Policy 
for Nonacademic 
Staff 
(Doc. T73-090R) 



FY 1976 Opera- 
ting Budget 






4672 



Executive 
6-25-75 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Worc ester — 

Classification 

of Position 

Titles 

(Doc. T75-154) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

with safeguarding the welfare and high educational quality of the 
University. A motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : The Executive Committee recognizes the serious 
fiscal condition of the Commonwealth. Never- 
theless, the Executive Committee has concluded 
that the implementation of a budget for the Uni- 
versity as included in the Governor's Budget 
Recommendations (House I) will make the provision 
of quality education to a scheduled 30,638 full- 
time-equivalent students an impossibility. There- 
fore, the President, in consultation with the 
Chancellors, is authorized to enter into dis- 
cussion with the appropriate executive and legis- 
lative agencies and is authorized to respond in 
the name of the University to those responsible 
proposals which reflect the needs of the Univer- 
sity and the fiscal condition of the Commonwealth. 

The Chairman called upon Acting Dean Butcher to review 
the next item, a proposed Classification of Position Titles at UM/ 
Worcester (Doc. T75-154) . The position of Administrative Director 
of Radiology, said Dr. Butcher, had been favorably reviewed by the 
President. He said the individual contemplated for the position 
was uniquely suited for the position and would aid greatly in the 
development of excellence in the Department of Radiology in both 
the hospital and the Medical School. Dr. Wheeler added that the 
Department of Radiology was an extremely complicated technical 
operation and was highly important to the operation of the teaching 
hospital. A motion was thereupon made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To approve and adopt the Classification of 

Position Titles, University of Massachusetts, 
Worcester, as contained in Doc. T75-154. 

VOTED : That the classification of Position Titles 
under the Provisions of Chapter 648 of the 
Acts of 1962 shall be fixed in a weekly salary 
range from a minimum to a maximum or fixed at 
a specific weekly salary rate which shall not 
be changed except by vote of the Board of 
Trustees and such classification shall not be 
designated by any job group number or grade. 

VOTED : That in accordance with the provisions of 

Chapter 648 of the Acts of 1962, the position 
title in the Professional Staff contained in 
Doc. T75-154 is classified at a weekly salary 
rate specified after the title of position sub- 
ject to subsequently being amended, revised, 
added to or repealed by the Board of Trustees 
under the provisions of said Chapter 648. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

At the Chairman's request, Mr. Gartenberg addressed a 
proposed Allocation of Funds for Coopers & Lybrand (Doc. T75-162) . 
This allocation, he said, would cover the cost of some of the 
University-wide aspects of the Coopers & Lybrand study. There 
was a motion, which was seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To authorize the transfer of $11,500 from 
Trustee Reserve to the Trust Fund Interest 
Account. These funds are to be used for pay- 
ment to Coopers & Lybrand for services rendered. 

Upon a motion made and seconded it was 

VOTED : To enter executive session to discuss Per- 
sonnel Actions. 

After the executive session, motions were made and 
seconded and it was 

VOTED : To confirm and approve the Personnel Action, 
UM/Amherst, as detailed in Doc. T75-153. 

VOTED : To confirm and approve the Personnel Action, 
UM/Worcester , as detailed in Doc. T75-145. 

VOTED : To confirm and approve the Personnel Action, 
UM/Worcester, as detailed in Doc. T75-166. 

VOTED : To confirm and approve the Personnel Actions, 
UM/Worcester, as detailed in Docs. T75-163, 
T75-164, and T75-165. 

VOTED : That every personnel action shall be subject to 

the policies and procedures now in effect as sub- 
sequently amended, revised, added to, or repealed 
by the Board of Trustees with respect to pro- 
fessional personnel under provisions of Chapter 
75 of the General Laws as amended by Chapter 
648, 1962. The classification, salary range, 
and descriptive job specification for each posi- 
tion to which a member of the professional staff 
is hereby appointed, promoted, transferred, or 
determined by the Board of Trustees or under 
their authority. 

There being no further business to come before the Com- 
mittee, the meeting was adjourned at 1:30 p.m. 



4673 



Executive 
6-25-75 



Allocation 


of 


Funds for 




Coopers & 




Lybrand 





(Doc. T75-162) 



Executive 
Session 



I 



(JTadyjO Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4 6 74 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



NOT USED 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

August 19, 1975; 2:00 p.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Gordon, President Wood; 

Trustees O'Keefe, Robertson, Winthrop ; Secretary Hardy, Treasurer 
Johnson; Miss Eichel, recorder 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice President for 
Academic Affairs; Mr. Brand, Associate Treasurer; Mrs. Hanson, 
Associate Budget Director; Mr. Heiney , Assistant Treasurer; Mr. 
Kaplan, Assistant Vice President for Organization and Management; 
Mr. Searson, General Counsel 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Gulko, Budget Director 

UM/ Boston : Mr. Baxter, Director, Budget and Control; Mr. Free- 
land, Dean of College IV; Mr. Patterson, Frank L. Boy den, Profes- 
sor of the University 

UM/Worcester : Mr. Fellner, Assistant Controller; Dr. Dalen, 
Chairman, Department of Cardiology 

Invited Guests : Mr. Joseph Albert, Insurance Counselor; Mr. John 
Wilkins and Mr. John Wood of Standish, Ayer & Wood, Investment 
Consultants; Mr. Wallace Ackley, Mr. Eugene Freedman, Mr. Lawrenc£ 
Pszenny and Mr. Murray Washtenheim of Coopers & Lybrand , Auditors 

The meeting was called to order at 2:13 p.m. by Chair- 
man Gordon. 

At the invitation of Chairman Gordon, Mr. John Wood of 
Standish, Ayer & Wood, Investment Consultants, reported on the 
current status of the market, stating that it has been improving 
as he had predicted. He said he had no specific recommendations 
to make with regard to individual stocks, but wished to propose 
some investment guidelines as set forth in the Investment Policy 
(Doc. T75-136) previously distributed to the Committee. This 
policy, he said, allows for fluctuation in the ratio of stocks to 
bonds as the condition of the market changes. At the request of 
Mr. Wood, Mr. John Wilkins explained the factors which had been 
considered in arriving at the proposed policy. 

Mr. Wilkins said that the policy which they have pro- 
posed to the Committee is the result of an internal search to 
identify the economic variables which will affect the market. 
He said they had reached as a result of their study the follow- 
ing three conclusions: 



4675 



Report of 

Investment 

Counsel 



4676 

Finance Comm. 
8-19-75 



Report of 
Insurance 
Consultant 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

1. The real and gross national product will have 
a slower growth in the future than it has had 
in the past several years. 

2. Inflation will continue for a long time. 

3. Interest rates will remain high at the level 
of 8 or 9 percent. 

Responding to questions from the Committee, Mr. Wood 
said that in the current market emphasis should be on short-term 
(less than five years) rather than long-term investments, that he 
did not anticipate any major changes in the University portfolio, 
and that he thought the investment policy guidelines should be 
reviewed on a yearly basis if not more often. There being no 
further discussion, the report of the Investment Consultants was 
accepted by the Committee. 

Chairman Gordon next requested Mr. Joseph Albert, 
Insurance Consultant, to report on the various insurance negotia- 
tions for the University. Mr. Albert turned first to the matter 
of malpractice insurance at UM/Worcester for personnel other 
than physicians. This insurance, he said, is now obtainable 
through the Massachusetts Joint Underwriting Association estab- 
lished by the Foley bill, but the cost is fairly substantial. He 
said the premium for a policy to insure thirty residents would 
cost in the neighborhood of $48,000. Technicians, nurses, phar- 
macists, paramedics and students could be covered for substan- 
tially less, approximately $5,700. 

The cost to cover UM/Worcester personnel, including 
hospital employees, for general liability insurance, he said, 
would be approximately $58,000. General liability insurance for 
the University, excluding the Worcester medical complex, amounts 
to about $22,000. Mr. Albert stated that the purpose of the 
general liability insurance policy is to protect individuals and 
not the University as a whole since the University itself is pro- 
tected by the Doctrine of Sovereign Immunity. The Massachusetts 
Joint Underwriting Association can issue policies only to hos- 
pitals and licensed physicians. 

Argonaut Insurance, he said, can provide malpractice 
insurance for about half the cost quoted by the Joint Underwriting 
Association, but the company has been in financial difficulty. 
Mr. Albert said that a solvency fund has been established by the 
State for the purpose of bailing out bankrupt insurance companies 
but he would need to find out how large the fund is before deter- 
mining the feasibility of purchasing insurance through a more 
economical source such as Argonaut. 

It was agreed that malpractice insurance should be 
available to employees at the time of the opening of the hospital, 



I 



I 



4677 



Finance Comm. 
8-19-75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

currently scheduled for December 1, and that since the outpatient 
clinic is currently in operation and residents are now working 
in hospitals in the area, coverage for these people is required 
immediately. In response to a query from Trustee Robertson, 
Mr. Albert said that the malpractice policy is designed to cover 
those persons not a part of the group practice plan. Physicians 
participating in the group practice plan purchase their own mal- 
practice insurance. 

It was the sense of the meeting that since malpractice 
coverage is more urgently needed than general liability at UM/ 
Worcester, it should be purchased immediately and the purchase 
of general liability insurance could be deferred until further 
study identified various options for obtaining this coverage at 
a more reasonable cost. 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was then 

VOTED ; That Joseph Albert, Insurance Counselor, be 

authorized to obtain a binder for malpractice 
insurance to cover residents (in accordance 
with list to be supplied by UM/Worcester) , 
technicians, nurses, students, pharmacists 
and paramedics (excluding physicians) , said 
insurance to be obtained from the Massachu- 
setts Joint Underwriting Association for a 
period of one month, effective immediately. 

Treasurer Johnson informed the Committee that although 
Mr. Albert had been authorized to put a binder on the general 
liability insurance coverage for the University, excluding UM/ 
Worcester, no action had been taken by the Committee with regard 
to the payment of premiums for this insurance. Upon motion made 
and seconded, it was, therefore 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
insurance premiums for the General Liability 
Insurance coverage already authorized be paid 
after approval of the terms of the policy by 
the Office of the General Counsel. 

Chairman Gordon asked Dr. Dalen, Chairman of the Depart- UM/Worcester — 
ment of Cardiology at UM/Worcester , to explain the additional Addition to 
charges being requested as outlined in Addition to University of Hospital Rate 
Massachusetts Teaching Hospital Proposed Rate Book — Cardiovascula|: Book 
Medicine (Doc. T76-001) . Dr. Dalen explained that the proposed (Doc. T76-001) 
fees would cover the cost of contracting for the services of 
Clinical Data Services Inc. to record and interpret electrocardio- 
grams, which would be substantially less expensive than the pur- 
chase of this equipment and the hiring of a qualified technician 
to operate it. 



4 6 78 



Finance Comm. 
8-19-75 



UM/Boston — 
Authorization 
to Negotiate 
Contract with 
Northeastern 
University 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the physician's fees and hospital charges as 
set forth in Doc. T76-001, and to incorporate 
same in Doc. T75-050A, said amended document 
to be redesignated Doc. T75-050B. 

At the invitation of Chairman Gordon, Vice President 
Lynton introduced the next agenda item, authorization for UM/ 
Boston to negotiate a contract with Northeastern University where 
by UM/Boston students may take and receive credit for course 
offerings at Northeastern University to supplement courses being 
offered by College IV, the College of Professional Studies. Mr. 
Lynton said he hoped that this was the first of many such coop- 
erative ventures and then asked Dean Freeland to explain the pro- 
posed program in more detail. Dean Freeland said that this pro- 
gram is designed so that students may take advantage of a wider 
range of programs than can be offered by the Boston campus in its 
current financial constraints. He said that he and Professor 
Patterson had talked with many of the other institutions in the 
area and that he hoped additional similar cooperative programs 
may be developed with Northeastern and other institutions in the 
years to come. He said that UM/Boston will provide the core 
courses in its undergraduate management program and certain ad- 
vanced courses, but that some specialized advanced courses which 
UM/Boston cannot provide, can be taken at Northeastern' s College 
of Business Administration. 

President Wood commented that he is enthusiastic about 
this first program of interinstitutional cooperation to be pro- 
vided under a contractual arrangement. He said that it has now 
been four years since he first made the proposal to the Asso- 
ciation of Independent Colleges and Universities in Massachusetts; 
that such cooperative ventures be developed. 

President Wood stated that he believes the program pre- 
sented by Dean Freeland of College IV is a good one, and he en- 
couraged such contractual arrangements when it is determined that 
the services purchased cost less than an in-house program would 
cost. He added that the issue of redundancy would also be a 
factor to be considered. He emphasized that whatever cost formula 
is worked out with Northeastern for costing, it should not nec- 
essarily set a precedent for other interinstitutional arrange- 
ments in the future. 

There being no further discussion, upon motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
authorize the administration of the University 
of Massachusetts at Boston in consultation with 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the President's Office to commence the nego- 
tiation of contractual relationships with 
Northeastern University whereby students en- 
rolled in the Management Program in the College 
of Professional Studies at UMass/Boston will 
be entitled to enroll in courses offered by 
the College of Business Administration at 
Northeastern University. Further, that this 
authorization be subject to the following 
conditions : 

(1) The program shall be limited to 
advanced elective courses not offered by 
UMass/Boston and to eligible students; 

(2) The contractual amount to be paid 
by the University to Northeastern for each 
course enrollment shall not exceed the re- 
spective credit hour cost paid by a full- 
time day student in the undergraduate pro- 
gram in the College of Business Administra- 
tion, of Northeastern University, as shall 
be specified in the contract; 

(3) The experimental programs estab- 
lished by the aforesaid contracts shall be 
for a period not to exceed three years and 
not to commence prior to the fall semester 
of 1976. The program will be independently 
evaluated by each institution at the conclu- 
sion of the stated period. 

(4) All contracts shall be subject to 
the availability of funds; a minimum level of 
$20,000 and not to exceed $40,000 shall be in- 
cluded in the University's Fiscal Year 1977 
Budget request to fund the operation of the 
program during the 1976-7 7 academic year. 

(5) All contracts shall be subject to 
review by the General Counsel to the Univer- 
sity, and approval by the Board of Trustees. 

Chairman Gordon asked Chancellor Bromery to introduce 
two items which had been deferred at the joint meeting of the 
Budget and Finance Committees on June 4. Chancellor Bromery 
turned first to the establishment of a Horseback Riding Trust 
Fund — UM/Amherst (Doc. T76-002) . He informed the Committee that 
this activity is a voluntary activity and, therefore, the fee to 
be established would be a voluntary one. There would be no cost 
to the University for this program. He said the Office of 



4 6 79 



Finance Comm, 
8-19-75 



UM/Amherst — 

Horseback 

Riding Trust 

Fund 

(Doc. T76-002) 



4 6 80 



Finance Comm, 
8-19-75 



UM/Amherst — 
Graduate Pro- 
gram Fee In- 
crease 



UM/Amherst — 
Audit of the 
School of 
Education 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

General Counsel had reviewed the program statement and found this 
activity to be one for which a trust fund could legally be estab- 
lished. 

On motion made and seconded, it was then 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that a 

voluntary thirty dollar ($30) per semester fee 
be established for students participating in 
the horseback riding program at the University 
of Massachusetts at Amherst as set forth in 
Trustee Document T76-002; further, that said 
fees shall be deposited in the Horseback 
Riding Trust Fund. 

It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
authorize the Treasurer of the University to 
establish in accordance with University policy 
a Horseback Riding Trust Fund at the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts at Amherst for the deposit 
of fees collected from students participating 
in the horseback riding program; further, that 
expenditures from said trust fund shall be for 
the purposes set forth in Trustee Document 
T76-002. 

Chancellor Bromery then introduced the second deferred 
i item, the Graduate Program Fee — UM/Amherst. He said that in this 
case the trust fund had already been established and the request 
before the Committee was for an increase in the fee from $10 to 
$50. Counsel, he said, had reviewed this fee increase and had no 
objection to it. Therefore, on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that effective January 1, 1976, 
the Graduate Program Fee, UM/Amherst, be and 
hereby is established at a rate of $50 per 
semester. 

Both of the above fees, if approved by the Board of Trustees, are 
to be incorporated in the FY 1976 Fee-based Budget , UM/Amherst 
(Doc. T75-121) , which was approved by the Board on June 4, 1975. 

Chairman Gordon then asked President Wood to introduce 
the subject of the audit of the School of Education, UM/Amherst. 
President Wood said this matter has occupied a good share of the 
time of the Finance Committee, as well as that of the offices of 
the President, the Treasurer and the Chancellor since December. 
Vice President Lynton, he said, had reported at the August meeting 
of the Board of Trustees on the program development in the School 
of Education. The Committee, he said, now had before it the 



( 



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1 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

reports of the various internal audits conducted by the Trea- 
surer's Office as well as the report of the external audit con- 
ducted at his request by Coopers & Lybrand. Also included in 
this material, he said, was a summary report by the Treasurer 
on the internal audits and a summary report by himself on the 
entire package. All this material, he said, would be distributed 
to the legal, legislative and executive departments of state 
government as well as to the press, following this meeting. 

President Wood said that investigations conducted by 
various law enforcement agencies had caused some delay in the 
work of the auditors, since these investigations made access to 
some of the records difficult. He said that although it was 
found that some funds had been misused, the total amount misused 
was considerably less than had been reported by the Press. He 
said even a limited amount of misuse of funds is unacceptable 
and that steps were being taken to correct the processes which 
had made it possible. He stated his feeling of responsibility 
as an administrator for the weakness of the general system which 
relied on procedures of the 60' s, and he stated that major re- 
forms were now underway. He said also, that the audit reports 
indicated the soundness of the action of the Board of Trustees 
in its response on June A to the recommendations of the Hay 
Report. President Wood expressed his indebtedness to the repre- 
sentatives of Coopers & Lybrand for their readiness to understand 
the inner workings of a university and for their concern about 
the University and its integrity. He then called upon Mr. 
Wallace Ackley of Coopers & Lybrand to summarize the findings 
of their audit. 

Mr. Ackley said the Coopers & Lybrand review had been 
conducted in two phases — Phase I, a review of systems for pro- 
cessing and accounting for contracts and grants, and Phase II, 
tests of contracts and grants of the School of Education. Their 
conclusions are, he said, that the School of Education exhibited 
variations such as are found in other similar institutions. The 
Dean's objectives were broadly set, he said, which created an en- 
vironment that led some members of the staff to feel that the 
ends justified the means. Mr. Ackley reported that they found 
little money which was misused for personal gain, but simply 
that money was used for purposes other than those allowed under 
the terms of the contracts. As an example, he said money for 
honoraria might have been used as a means of giving financial 
aid to students. He said that since the audits by the FBI, HEW 
and the internal units of the University all covered somewhat 
different areas from that of Coopers & Lybrand, he felt that the 
ground had been thoroughly covered. He said that Phase I of 
their investigation revealed the need for a vice president for 
management and a strong person in the role of vice chancellor for 
administration and finance on each campus. President Wood stated 
that the Executive Committee had made the recommendation to the 
Board of Trustees at its June 4 meeting for the establishment of 



4681 



Finance Comm. 
8-19-75 



46821 



Finance Comm, 
8-19-75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the position of vice president for management and clarified that 
this decision was not the result of the Hay Report, but that 
the Trustees had determined the need for this function in the 
central administration. Mr. Ackley went on to outline some of 
the specific procedural recommendations. 



Mr. Freedman added that after 
opportunity to review the Coopers & Lybr 
Ackley would be happy to return to answe 
mittee might have, and President Wood sa 
the Committee would wish to discuss the 
Gordon responded that the members of the 
be studying these reports in detail and 
work would be ready to discuss the repor 



the Committee had had an 
and report, he and Mr. 
r any questions the Corn- 
id that he was certain 
report again. Chairman 

Finance Committee would 
after doing their horne- 
ts at the October meeting 



President Wood asked Treasurer Johnson if he wished to 
comment on the internal audits. Mr. Johnson explained that the 
internal audit consisted of seven separate but concurrent parts. 
Conducted by the internal audit staff under the direction of 
Assistant Treasurer Ray Heiney, these reports focused on specific 
details and figures. The Coopers & Lybrand audit focused on 
procedural weaknesses. Both approaches, he said, revealed the 
same procedural and legal exceptions. 

Mr. Johnson said that the internal auditors worked 
closely with the Federal Bureau of Investigation as well as with 
other law enforcement agencies involved, and turned over to them 
the findings as they were discovered. Reports were also made to 
the Chancellor and the President. Corrective measures were 
initiated during the course of the audit, including those out- 
lined in the Policy Guidelines for the Development and Adminis- 
tration of Grants and Contracts for Sponsored Programs in In- 
struction, Research and Public Service dated March 26, 1975, 
upon which the Board of Trustees on April 2, 1975, took sup- 
portive action. Additional corrective measures, he said, were 
currently being implemented. 

Vice President Lynton called attention to the fact 
that documentation for the set of internal audit reports had 
not been distributed to the Committee because of the volume of 
the material and the cost of reproducing it. However, he said, 
it is available upon request. 

Chairman Gordon emphasized that the completion of 
these audits is only the beginning of the work for the Com- 
mittee and other University segments. He added that the Finance 
Committee will take a far more active role in these matters. He 
said it has taken eleven years to develop the University system, 
since the establishment of the Boston campus in 1964. Through- 
out the 60' s, the Trustees reaffirmed the system and when Bob 
Wood became President, he became President of the University 
system. The time for debate of whether or not we are a system, 



J 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

he said, is past and the present need is to determine how best 
to implement the system. Both Coopers & Lybrand and Hay Asso- 
ciates, he said, had recommended a stronger input from the centra 
system office, and he expressed the hope that the various cam- 
puses and faculty groups would recognize that the University 
must function as a system. 

At the conclusion of the discussion of the audit re- 
ports, Chairman Gordon called for an executive session and at 
4:00 p.m., on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To go into executive session for the purpose 

of discussing the matter of the Ohio land sale. 

At 4:20 p.m. the executive session concluded and on 
motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Treasurer of the University be author- 
ized to confirm an extension of time to 
March 13, 1976 for the buyer to fulfill the 
contingencies set forth in Real Estate Pur- 
chase Agreement, dated August 13, 1973, 
between the Board of Trustees and Nationwide 
Development Company (Trustee Doc. T75-085) 
and to execute in the name of and on behalf 
of the Trustees a deed or deeds in accor- 
dance with said agreement, or as said agree- 
ment may be modified after further negotia- 
tions by the Treasurer and Nationwide De- 
velopment Company, after consultation with 
General Counsel; provided, however, that 
should the sale of Parcel II be deferred, the 
purchase price for Parcel I shall be not less 
than $462,000, and the purchase price for 
Parcel II shall be the balance of the total 
purchase price of $1,000,000. 

There being no further business, the meeting adjourned 
at 4:25 p.m. 



% 



Glady? Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



lr 



I 



n 



4683 



Finance Comm. 
8-19-75 



4 6 84 



UM/ Amherst— 

Legal Services 
Office 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON STUDENT AFFAIRS 

September 3, 1975; 10:30 a.m. 

Campus Center, Room 803 

University of Massachusetts/Amherst 

PRESENT: i Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Shaler; Trustees Eddy, 

Morgenthau, O'Keefe, Troy; Secretary Hardy; Ms. Eichel, Assis- 
tant Secretary 



Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice President for 
Academic Affairs; Mr. Searson, General Counsel; Mr. Cahill, Staff 
Assistant for Student Affairs 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Dr. Gage, Vice Chancellor for 
Student Affairs; Professor Tillona, Special Assistant to the 
Chancellor; Ms. Asack, Staff Assistant to the Chancellor; Ms. 
Rahaim, Special Assistant to the Chancellor for Public Affairs; 
Ms. Stack, Graduate Student Representative; Professor Wilkinson, 
Faculty Representative 

Guests : Ira Horowitz, Director of Legal Services; Peter 0. 
Knowlton, Student Action Committee; Michael Parkhurst, Chair- 



person of Legal Services Governing Board; Henry Ragin , student; 
Jim Starr, student attorney 

The meeting was called to order at 10:40 a.m. by 
Chairman Shaler. The sole item of business was a proposal from 
the Amherst campus that the scope of services of the Legal Ser- 
vices Office be expanded to include representation of students 
in criminal matters and in civil litigation against the Univer- 
sity, both hitherto disallowed. The Chairman observed that this 
matter had been pending for some months but that the Committee 
had not taken action before now because of legal questions raised 
by Counsel Searson. Mr. Searson had since provided a legal opin- ! 
ion to the Committee which said that the University was not re- 
quired to authorize such services, but that it could at its dis- 
cretion. He commended Mr. Searson for his work on the issue. 

Chairman Shaler reported that the Legal Services Of- 
fice had sent to him at his summer home an excellent memorandum 
describing the merits of the case with the request that he for- 
ward it to the other members of the Committee. He said he had 
been unable to do this from his summer home, and said he re- 
gretted that the Committee had not had the benefit of reading 
the memorandum. 

Chancellor Bromery explained that the campus had always 
supported this office because of its important service to stu- 
dents who were in legal trouble. This was important to students, 
he said, because of the prevalent attitude on the part of some 
parts of the community that students were not good citizens. 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Vice President Lynton said that the President was 
fully in support of the Legal Services Office, but the issue 
before the committee was not the existence of the office itself, 
but the policy issue of whether the office should be authorized 
to sue the University. He continued that the President supports 
the recommendation of the Chancellor with hesitation, because he 
fears that this authorization could lead to the office being 
abused or used in a frivolous matter. He suggested that the 
Board might wish to give approval for a limited time, after which 
it could reconsider the case for a permanent decision. 

Chairman Shaler said he believed that the Board should 
vote for a permanent policy, not a temporary one, and Chancellor 
Bromery pointed out that the policy would in effect be recon- 
sidered annually anyway when the Amherst yearly fee-based budget 
is submitted to the Board for its approval. 



I 



Trustee Eddy stated 
for the Trustees to be interf 
funds. She said it would be 
the legality of such use into 
further, that this would cons 
Dr. Gage and Mr. Lynton both 
Board was responsible for the 
by its authority, and said it 
authorize explicitly such an 
activities . 



that she believed it to be wrong 
ering in the disposition of student 
"paternalism" for them to go beyond 

the area of propriety. She said, 
titute an undesirable precedent, 
pointed out, however, that the 
se funds because they were raised 

was necessary for the Board to 
expansion of the scope of legal 



I 



Mr. Searson observed that propriety and legality are 
not distinct terms, and stressed that Chapter 75 of the General 
Laws requires that the Board strictly oversee the operation of 
all trust funds. This action, he said, would raise the potential 
for suits against individual Trustees involving liability, in- 
volves the issue of conflict-of-interest with criminal penalties 
unless such conduct is specifically allowed by the Board, and 
involves the issue of the power of the Board of Trustees over 
University employees (the student attorneys) . He observed also 
that the Legal Services Governing Board, which oversees the Legal 
Services Office, operates under a set of rules which have never 
been approved by the Board of Trustees as required by Chapter 75. 

Chancellor Bromery said it had been his impression that 
when the Board of Trustees had approved the Student Affairs 
Trust Funds, it had delegated to the campus the authority to 
review the budgets. He said he had brought this issue to the 
Board only because it had involved a policy issue. 

Trustee Eddy said she believed that civil litigation 
against the University should only be of the calss action type, 
not suits of individuals. Mr. Horowitz replied that the rules 
of the Legal Services Governing Board did not exclude suits on 
behalf of individuals, though such suits would presumable be of 



4 6 85 

Stu. Affairs 
9-3-75 



4686 



Stu. Affairs 
9-3-75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

moment to all students. Discussion followed on legal terminology 
and about the propriety of kinds of civil litigation against the 
University. Chancellor Bromery pointed out some of the other 
important services provided by the Legal Services Office, in- 
cluding publication of warnings to students about penalties for 
certain offenses. Mr. Horowitz said that the purpose of the 
Legal Services Office was primarily to address individual stu- 
dents' problems unrelated to the University, such as landlord 
relations or problems with a used car dealer. These services, 
he said, would take precedence over any kind of "frivolous" 
civil action. 

Trustee Troy said he believed that the explanation 
given of the kinds of services which would be provided under the 
expanded allowance of the office was not being sufficiently 
clarified. He said that concrete illustrations were necessary. 
It was pointed out that the paper from the students, which was 
not sent to the other Trustees on the Committee, did spell out 
the kinds of legal services to be provided by the Legal Services 
Office. 

Chairman Shaler asked for a motion on the matter. A 
motion was made and seconded. In further discussion, Trustee 
Eddy stated that she could not support such a motion — to approve 
the expansion of services — on the basis of the limited discussion 
which had taken place. She said she believed that the Committee 
should table the matter until proper study could be given to 
the memorandum prepared by the Legal Services Office but not pro-j 
vided to the Board, as well as to the Legal Services Governing 
Board rules which Mr. Searson said had not been approved by the 
Board. She cited a need for a more general discussion of some of 
the implications of criminal representation, and said she would 
object, if she were a student, to the use of these funds for 
individual criminal representation. However, she said, the 
Board of Trustees should not prohibit this. Citing statements 
by the chair and by Trustee O'Keefe that the issue had been 
"kicking around for a long time," she said this could not justify 
action without sufficient discussion. 

Trustee Morgenthau entered the meeting for the first 
time as a member of the Committee, and was welcomed by the 
Chairman. After hearing discussion, she said she was sympathetic 
to the request of the students, but did not feel that she could 
vote on the motion until she had had a chance to study the 
matter thoroughly. 

There was no further discussion and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
attorneys in the Legal Services Office be 
authorized to represent students in criminal 
cases and in civil litigation against the 
University. 



\ 



■ 



i 



1 



f MAs 




O 



| UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

$ AMHERST • BOSTON • WORCESTER 



II 



OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY 

ONE WASHINGTON MALL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617)723-7820 , 



September 12, 1975 



I 



I hereby waive notice of the meeting of the Committee 
on the Budget of the Board of Trustees of the University of Massa- 
chusetts held on September 11, 1975, at Boston, Massachusetts, pur- 
suant to Section 4(a) of the By-Laws of the Board of Trustees. 



/ ... 






N — .' / ; ••■ ; -, i 



*) 



3f3 



Signature 



' 







UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

AMHERST • BOSTON - WORCESTER 



OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY 
ONE WASHINGTON MALL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617) 723-7820 



September 12, 1975 



I hereby waive notice of the meeting of the Committee 
on the Budget of the Board of Trustees of the University of Massa- 
chusetts held on September 11, 1975, at Boston, Massachusetts, pur- 
suant to Section 4(a) of the By-Laws of the Board of Trustees. 



s 




Signature 



i 



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i 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Morgenthau abstained. The Chairman did not 
vote, since there was no tie. Several persons questioned the 
wisdom of bringing such a vote — one to nothing — to the Board. 
Chancellor Bromery suggested that the Committee's action, based 
on one vote, might not be well received by the full Board. He 
said he would not like to take the risk of having to start the 
process all over again if this should result in the Board's 
voting negatively. He said it might take months to bring the 
matter before the Board for reconsideration. 

A motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED: To reconsider the previous vote. 



It was then 



MOVED : 



That the Committee on Student Affairs rec- 
ommend to the Board of Trustees that attorneys 
in the Legal Services Office be authorized to 
represent students in criminal cases and in 
civil litigation against the University. 



The motion was seconded. It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To table the previous motion until the 
September meeting of the Committee on 
Student Affairs. 

Chairman Shaler asked that interested parties in this 
issue send to the Secretary now and in the future all materials 
which are to be distributed to the Committee. He and other 
Trustees present asked specifically that the memorandum prepared 
by the Legal Services Office, the rules and regulations of the 
Legal Services Governing Board, and the minutes of the May 
meeting of the Committee be mailed to the Committee for considera 
tion in advance of its September meeting. There was no further 
business to bring before the Committee, and the meeting was ad- 
journed at 11:35 a.m. 



OsiadyJ Keith Hardy 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4687 

Stu. Affairs 
9-3-75 



4 6 88 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

September 3, 1975; 11:00 a.m. 

Campus Center, Room 804 

University of Massachusetts/Amherst 



i 



PRESENT 



Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Healey; President Wood; 



Trustees Carlson, Croce, Rowland, Shaler, Troy; Secretary Hardy; 
Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice President for 
Academic Affairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery 

UM/Boston: Chancellor Golino 



UM/Worcester : 



Acting Dean Butcher 



The meeting was called to order at 11:20 a.m. At 
11:21, a motion was made, seconded, and it was 



VOTED 



To enter executive session to discuss honorary 



degree nominations. 



The executive session ended at 12:45. The Chairman 
brought before the Committee the proposed authorization of the 
Chancellor of UM/Boston to negotiate and execute an agreement 
with the City of Boston for the use of the building at 100 Arl- 
ington Street on a temporary basis by the Boston Schools. The 
President described this action as part of a continuing effort 
of the University to be as helpful as possible during Phase II 
of desegregation. There was no objection and after a motion was 
made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees autho- 
rize the Chancellor of the University of Massa- 
chusetts at Boston, or his designee, to nego- 
tiate an agreement with the City of Boston, or 
its designee, whereby for a period of time not 
extending beyond June 30, 1976, the third, fourth, 
fifth, sixth, seventh, and eighth floors of the 
University's facility at 100 Arlington Street, 
Boston, may be occupied and utilized by the tem- 
porary Madison Park High School for education 
of approximately seven hundred students in 
return for a payment for expenses attributable 
to the City of Boston's use of said facility. 
Further, that the Chancellor of the University 
of Massachusetts at Boston, after consultation 
with the President, be empowered and authorized 
to execute an agreement on behalf of the Univer- 
sity upon successful completion of said 
negotiations . 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Healey noted that the matter of selection of 
a recipient of the 1975 University Medal for Outstanding Service, 
which had been on the agenda, had been postponed to a later 
meeting of the Committee. There being no further business, the 
meeting was adjourned at 12:50. 



4 6 89 



Exec. Comm. 
9-3-75 



QGla&yt, Keith Hardy Q 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4 6 90 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

September 3, 1975; 12:30 p.m. 
Room 1001-2, Campus Center 
University of Massachusetts/Amherst 

PRESENT: ' Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Troy; Trustees Croce, 

JMorgenthau, Shaler, Dennis; Mr. Callahan representing Trustee 
! Anrig; Miss Eichel, recorder 



Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice President for 
Academic Affairs 

UM/ Amherst : Mr. Alfange, Acting Provost and Vice Chancellor for 
Academic Affairs; Professor Wilkinson, Faculty Representative 

UM/Boston : Mr. Babcock, Acting Provost and Vice Chancellor for 
Academic Affairs; Professor Marshall, Faculty Representative 

The meeting was called to order at 1:05 p.m. by Chair- 
man Troy, who asked Vice President Lynton to explain to the Com- 
mittee the lateness of three proposed appointments to tenure and 
to review briefly the background and qualification of the can- 
didates. Mr. Lynton explained that two of the cases were appointf 
ments from outside of the University and neither could be made to! 
conform to the University calendar. In the third case, he said, 
the candidate had been a tenured member of the Amherst faculty 
for a long period of time, but that he would now be teaching at 
UM/Boston. Since tenure at Amherst is not automatically trans- 
ferable to Boston, this is technically considered a new appoint- 
ment with tenure and it is necessary to obtain Board concurrence. 



< 



UM/Boston — 
Appointment of 
Dr. Lawrence 
Foster as Asso- 
ciate Professor 
of Philosophy 
with Tenure 
(Doc. T76-003) 



I 



Mr. Lynton then turned to the first of the three rec- 
ommendations, the Award of Tenure to Dr. Lawrence Foster , UM/ 
Boston (Doc. T76-003) . Professor Foster, he said, had served 
the University with distinction as a tenured member of the fac- 
ulty at UM/Amherst, where he was an Associate Professor of 
Philosophy, with a special interest in ethics. He had accepted 
an invitation from UM/Boston, said Mr. Lynton, in order to become 
head of the Law and Justice Program at College I. Mr. Babcock, 
Acting Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs at UM/Boston, briefly 
reviewed the long-range plans for the Law and Justice Program, 
indicating that the expansion of the program, previously adminis- 
tered by the Chairman of the Philosophy Department, made it nec- 
essary to obtain a director who could devote more time to the 
program. 

Professor Marshall inquired if there was a Trustee doc- 
ument which stated that a professor is tenured at a particular 
campus rather than to the University as a whole, to which Mr. 
Lynton replied that, although there is no set policy, individuals 



k 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

have been voted tenure at a particular campus, and that to trans- 
fer a person with tenure could adversely affect the overall tenure 
ratio of a particular campus. There being no further discussion, 
on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur 

with the President's appointment of Dr. Lawrence 
Foster as Associate Professor of Philosophy with 
tenure at the University of Massachusetts at 
Boston, as set forth in Doc. T76-003. 

Chairman Troy asked Mr. Lynton to present the recommen- 
dation for the Award of Tenure to Dr. Paul S. Rosenkrantz , UM/ 
Boston (Doc. T76-004) . Mr. Lynton said that Professor Rosenkrantz 
comes to the University after many years of distinguished service 
at Holy Cross where he was a tenured member of the faculty. He 
will be Chairman of the Human Growth and Development Center in 
the College of Public and Community Service (College III). Mr. 
Babcock explained that this department has recently lost one 
major faculty member and the previous year had lost the depart- 
ment head. A strong and experienced person is needed, he said, 
to direct the activities of the Center, which offers certificates 
of competence in several areas. There being no opposition, on 
motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur 
with the President's appointment of Dr. Paul S. 
Rosenkrantz as Professor of Human Growth and 
Development with tenure at the University of 
Massachusetts at Boston, as set forth in Doc. 
T76-004. 

Chairman Troy next asked Mr. Lynton to present the 
third recommendation, the Award of Tenure to Dr. Sidney Schoeffler, 
UM/Amherst (Doc. T76-005) . Mr. Lynton said that Dr. Schoef f ler ' s | 
case is somewhat unusual in that he served as a member of the 
faculty at UM/Amherst for seventeen years and was tenured at the 
time he resigned. He is returning to the University after posi- 
tions of distinction with General Electric Corporation and the 
Project Impact of Market Strategy (PIMS) Program affiliated with 
the Harvard Business School. He has been director of the PIMS 
Program at Harvard and upon his appointment to the faculty at 
Amherst, he will bring this nationally recognized program with 
him to the University. Mr. Alfange added that the data collected 
by the PIMS Program are not available elsewhere. Professor 
Wilkinson stated that, in addition to being an outstanding econ- 
omist, Professor Schoeffler is a humanist which is reflected in 
his work. Mr. Alfange said that not only will Professor 
Schoeffler bring with him to the University a large and presti- 
gious program from the Harvard Business School, the program will 
also finance his salary as well as the salaries of his assistants 
There being no further discussion, on motion made and seconded, 
it was 



4691 



F&EP Comm. 
9-3-75 



UM/Boston — 
Appointment of 
Dr. Paul S. 
Rosenkrantz as 
Professor of 
Human Growth and 
Development with 
Tenure 
(Doc. T76-004) 



UM/Amherst — 
Appointment of 
Dr. Sidney 
Schoeffler as 
Professor of 
Marketing with 
Tenure 
(Doc. T76-005) 



4692 



F&EP Comm. 
9-3-75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur 
with the President's appointment of Dr. Sidney 
Schoeffler as Professor of Marketing with tenure 
at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, 
as set forth in Doc. T76-005. 

The meeting adjourned at 1:30 p.m. 



fllladyS Keith Hardy * 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



1 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON THE BUDGET 

September 11, 1975; 5:45 p.m. 
Chancellor's Office 
University of Massachusetts/Boston 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Carlson; President Wood; 
Trustees Croce, Dennis, Morgenthau, Rothenburger and Troy; 
Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice President for 
Academic Affairs; Mr. Gartenberg, Budget Director; Ms. Hanson, 
Associate Budget Director; Mr. Searson, General Counsel 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Gulko , Budget Director 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino 

UM/Worcester : Acting Dean Butcher; Mr. Cathey, Controller 

The meeting was convened at 5:45 p.m., immediately 
after the special meeting of the full Board, to discuss the bud- 
getary emergency and to vote on certification of critical needs 
funds and positions. Chairman Carlson began by making a point 
which he had not made at the full Board meeting, he said, because 
he did not wish to engage the Governor in a debate. The Governor 
had remarked that his administration had received relatively 
greater cooperation in his budget-cutting efforts from the 
Boards of Trustees of the other segments than from the University 
Since the proposed Executive Budget for FY76 provided an increase 
in the combined budgets of the other segments of $3.9 million 
over their initial FY75 appropriation and a decrease for the Uni- 
versity of $3.7 million, it was possible for the other Boards 
to respond to the Executive in a different fashion. Chairman 
Carlson said he wished to second the Governor's remarks about the 
plight of the Commonwealth, but he said he regarded as unfair 
his statement that the University's Board had been less coopera- 
tive than the other segmental Boards. 

President Wood informed the Committee that full support 
documentation for the figures in his memorandum of September 11 
to the Board was available to any Trustee. Chancellor Bromery 
spoke to amplify remarks he had made at the Board meeting on the 
effects of not receiving the critical needs on the Amherst campus L 
He observed that the Amherst campus would still have 120 vacant 
vacant faculty positions over and above the 83 critical need 
positions requested. Chancellor Golino said the Boston campus 
has many vacant positions. 

The Chairman asked about the adequacy of the additional 
fuel request, and Mr. Gulko said that it would be adequate for 
September. It was explained that to order coal, it is necessary 



4693 



Certification of 
Critical Needs 



4 6 94 



Budget Comm. 
9-11-75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

to encumber the funds, and the funds must be appropriated before 
they can be encumbered. Trustee Morgenthau asked if the campus 
stockpiled coal, and Mr. Gulko said it had, but that the stock- 
pile had been burned down during last year's austerity program. 
The point was also made that, since the figures on the additional 
fuel request were based on current fuel prices, it would be 
economical to order the fuel now. 

Chairman Carlson asked whether the funds requested for 
hospital positions now funded by the Medical School were to be 
replaced by Hospital funds once an appropriation was provided. 
Dean Butcher replied affirmatively, and explained that in the 
FY 1975 budget, the Worcester campus had been given a lump sum 
and been told to spend at least $600,000 and commit at least 118 
positions to the hospital. The campus had done that, he said, 
but since there had been no FY 1976 budget to date, the campus 
had been forced to support the hospital out of the Medical School 
budget. The President explained that the hospital was expected 
eventually to have a separate budget . 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED: To concur with the President's certification 
of critical needs funds resulting from bud- 
getary restrictions as contained in Attach- 
ment A of the President's memorandum to the 
Board of Trustees of September 11, 1975. 

and it was further 

VOTED: To concur with the President's certification 
of critical needs positions resulting from 
budgetary restrictions as contained in 
Attachment B of the President's memorandum 
to the Board of Trustees of September 11, 1975. 

Trustee Rothenburger abstained from the second vote, 
and suggested that it would be difficult to negotiate with Secre- 
tary Parks when the Budget Committee, according to the Secretary,' 
had assured him that the University would not increase its en- 
rollment this year. The Chairman said he could recall no such 
assurance. Trustee Rothenburger said the Secretary believed it 
had taken place at a meeting of the Committee which he, the Sec- 
retary, had attended on the Boston campus. Vice President Lynton 
and others said it was impossible to predict enrollment in a 
given year to a degree of accuracy closer than one or two percent 
because, although it is possible to know how many are admitted, 
it is impossible to predict exactly how many will actually show 
up. Chairman Carlson said the Board had not intended to delib- 
erately raise the enrollment, and suggested that this may have 
been what the Secretary was referring to. 

There was no further business to come before the Com- 
mittee, and the meeting was adjourned at 6:05 p.m. 



» 



\ 



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^Glady^l Keith Hardy 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



PRESENT 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT AFFAIRS 

October 1, 1975; 10:00 a.m. 
Room SF1-4 , Medical Sciences Building 
University of Massachusetts/Worcester 

Trustees and Trustee Staff : Trustee Shearer, Acting Chairman; 
Trustees Abrams, Eddy, Morgenthau, O'Keefe; Secretary Hardy; 
Miss Eichel, Assistant Secretary 

Trustees Absent: Chairman Shaler, Trustee Snowden 

Office of the President: Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice President for 



Academic Affairs; Mr. Bench, Assistant Counsel; Mr. Post, Assis- 
tant Vice President for Physical Planning; Mr. Cahill, Staff 
Assistant for Student Affairs; Ms. Crosson, Staff Associate for 
Academic Affairs 

UM/ Amherst : Dr. Gage, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs; Mr. 



Forsyth, Assistant to the Chancellor; Professor Wilkinson, Fac- 
ulty Representative 

UM/Boston: Mr. Tubbs, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs; Ms. 



Furman, Assistant to the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs 
UM/Worcester : Dr. Smith, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs 



and Provost; Dr. Hays, Acting Dean of Students 

Guests: Ira Horowitz, Jim Starr and Stephen Goldberg of the 



Legal Services Office; Michael Parkhurst, Chairperson of Legal 
Services Governing Board; John Brodhead, John Hight , and Pat 
Walker of the University of Massachusetts Tenants Association 

The meeting was called to order at 10:10 a.m. Secre- 
tary Hardy informed the Committee that Trustee Shearer had con- 
sented to chair the meeting in Chairman Shaler 's absence. 

Trustee Shearer asked Dr. Gage to review for the Com- 
mittee the first item on the agenda, the Legal Services Office at 
UM/ Amherst. Dr. Gage began by pointing out that the Legal Ser- 
vices Office had been in operation for several years, but that 
its activites had been limited to advice to students. The Office 
had originally had one attorney, but now had three, plus other 
staff, paid from the student activities fee levied on students 
by authority of the Trustees and apportioned by the Undergraduate 
Student Senate. 

During the winter the students had asked that the 
restriction against the Office be lifted so that it might repre- 
sent students in criminal cases and in suits against the Univer- 
sity. The students' argument had been that the University was 
obliged to allow this under the First Amendment to the United 
States Constitution. Counsel Searson's opinion had stated that 
the University was not so obliged, but could permit such services 



46 95 



UM/Amherst — 
Legal Services 



4696 



Stu. Affairs 
10-1-75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

if it chose. Dr. Gage referred to a letter from Mr. William 
Welch of the Hampshire Bar Association opposing the proposed 
expansion, and said his attitude was predictable and did not 
lessen his (Dr. Gage's) or the Chancellor's support. Vice Presi- 
dent Lynton informed the Committee that the proposal was also 
supported by President Wood. 

Questions were raised about the means by which stu- 
dents were consulted about the expansion, and about the volume 
of use experienced by the Office. Trustee O'Keefe stated that 
the proposal had been approved by a student Town Meeting last 
spring, and Mr. Horowitz of the Legal Services Office answered 
the second question by saying that the student Legal Services 
Governing Board had oversight over the activities of the Office, 
and its policy guidelines were designed to ensure that it not 
be overwhelmed by student requests. As examples of policy guide- 
lines set by the Board, Mr. Horowitz cited a rule against attor- 
neys representing students in fee-generating suits against the 
University, such as for damages incurred in a fall in a residence 
hall. He added that the students would have to exercise their 
oversight function if criminal representation is allowed also, 
addressing such issues as whether attorneys could represent stu- 
dents in shoplifting charges. 

Trustee Eddy expressed concern about the proposal. She 
said she thought there were public defenders sufficient for stu- 
dents' needs, and said the proposal might well result in higher 
fees for students. She wondered whether those students who had 
voted against the expansion of the Office would be able to check 
off the portion of the student fee which increases as a result 
of the expansion. She did not like the idea of all students 
paying for legal problems of a few. She observed that the Office 
and the fee had expanded since its inception and undoubtedly 
would continue to expand in the future. 

Trustee Abrams also expressed mixed feelings about the 
proposal. He questioned the wisdom of allowing students to sue 
the University with the support of a fee established and set by 
the University. He also asked for a more specific explanation 
of the kinds of civil actions which the Office might undertake. 
Mr. Horowitz said the Office could concentrate on broad-based 
actions on issues affecting a large number of students, such as 
the mandatory residence policy. 

Trustee Abrams pointed out that there were mechanisms 
by which students may seek redress of grievances against the 
University, that they are not forced to use legal means. Mr. 
Lynton replied that this was not a matter of University rules, 
which are covered by the Governance Document . If a rule were 
duly established by the Board but was thought by the students to 
be illegal, they would have no other recourse except to test the 
legality of the rule by legal means. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Lynton pointed out to the Committee that the 
Trustees would have an annual review of the Office when the Am- 
herst fee-based budget is submitted to them each spring. In 
fact, he said, this issue had come to the Committee as a result 
of a question raised by a member of the President's staff on the 
size of the budget increase requested for the Office. 

A discussion ensued about the process by which the 
Trustees might conduct a review of the Office's activities, if 
the expansion were to be approved. One Trustee said the program 
should be reviewed on its merits, not on its budget request, and 
another suggested that the matter of suits against the University 
might be of greater Trustee concern than that of criminal repre- 
sentation. As a result of this discussion, a motion was made and 
seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the attorneys employed in the Student Legal 
Services Office be authorized to represent 
students in criminal matters and to engage 
in litigation against the University on 
their behalf, such authorization not to ex- 
tend to the initiation of any new such liti- 
gation after the end of the current fiscal 
year without review and confirmation of such 
authorization by the Board of Trustees. 

Trustee Eddy asked that the minutes record that she was opposed 
in principle to the proposal. 

The second agenda item was a proposal by the Amherst 
campus for a cooperative management agreement between the Uni- 
versity and residents of student family housing. Mr. Lynton 
explained to the Committee that several substantial legal and 
administrative problems yet remained in the proposal as written. 
He said resolution of these problems was being actively sought, 
and that in the interim it would be appropriate for this Com- 
mittee to discuss the student life aspects of the proposal. He 
said he expected the problems to be resolved in the coming weeks, 
after which the proposal would return to the Committee, thence 
to the Finance Committee for consideration of financial and ad- 
ministrative issues. 

Dr. Gage described the historical background of the 
proposal, observing that the University desired an increased in- 
volvement of students in the management of their affairs. He 
said students would feel more responsible for the climate of 
life in the residence halls if they had a part in their manage- 
ment. The proposal would combine the three units of student 
family housing for administrative purposes and allow them to be 
administered by an incorporated cooperative, composed of tenants 
of the housing, with which the University would sign a contract. 



4697 



Stu. Affairs 
10-1-75 



UM/Amherst — 
Student Family 
Housing Coop- 
erative 



4 698 



Stu. Affairs 
10-1-75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dr. Gage said the discussions between the University and the stu- 
dents had grown out of a rent strike, and had yielded this proposal 

Dr. Gage explained the outstanding problems in the pro- 
posal. First, the properties are now owned by the University, 
but are managed by it through a delegation of the owner, the 
University of Massachusetts Building Authority. There is a 
legal question as to whether the Trustees may further delegate 
their responsibilities of management and maintenance. Second, 
under the proposal, the cooperative would hire a staff to perform 
technical maintenance while members themselves would agree to 
perform more routine upkeep such as sweeping walks and washing 
windows. This called into question the status of the professional 
maintenance staff presently employed by the University under a 
collective bargaining agreement. Dr. Gage said there were other 
problems, but that these were the two most substantial. 



Mr. Patrick Walker of the Tenants Association spoke 
next to the Committee. Describing cooperative experiments in 
other universities, he observed that in some places the properties; 
were owned by the students, in others the students leased the 
land, while at the University of Minnesota the Board of Trustees 
had hired an organization of students to manage the properties. 
He said the UM/Amherst proposal was closely modeled after the 
Minnesota system. 

Under the proposal, the cooperative would hire a pro- 
fessional staff to perform technical services which required 
licensure, while members themselves would perform routine main- 
tenance. The cooperative would determine the rent structure and 
would be responsible for the collection of rents. It would re- 
quire the University's assent before making any major structural 
change or repair, and could not drastically reduce rents without 
the University's permission. 

Mr. Forsyth asked Mr. Walker what educational benefits 
there were in the proposal, and Mr. Walker distributed a two- 
page list of educational goals. According to the document, the 
two fundamental goals were "...to develop critical reflective 
thinking by making possible self -autonomy , responsibility, dia- 
logue, and the integration of theory and practice..." and to 
"...develop a community process whose bounds could extend far 
beyond Married Students' Housing." 



Trustee Morgenthau said the proposal appeared to be a 
useful, constructive way for the University to meet the need for 
residential facilities, and said she hoped the University would 
proceed as quickly as possible to resolve the remaining problems, 
She observed that certain standards must be met — no leaks in the 
roof or rats in the cellar — and added that the spirit of respon- 
sibility to the comj unity must be maintained. This agreement 
could enable the University to get on with the business of 
learning and teaching. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Eddy congratulated the students on the state- 
ment of educational goals. She described the proposal as very 
exciting and said she hoped that, if successful, the concept 
could be extended to student rentals in the private sector in 
Amherst . 

A lengthy discussion followed on the legal and tech- 
nical arrangements governing the ownership, financing, and 
management of campus residential facilities. Trustee O'Keefe 
asked Mr. Bench how long it would take to iron out the ques- 
tions surrounding the power of the Trustees to subdelegate their 
administrative authority, and Mr. Bench replied that it could 
earily take a few months. Discussion turned to the need for the 
Committee to be kept informed of progress made in these areas, 
and Dr. Gage said he would keep the Committee up to date at each 
of its next several meetings. 

Trustees Shearer and Abrams also expressed support for 
the proposal, and a motion was therefore made, seconded, and it 
was 

VOTED : That the Committee on Student Affairs is in 
favor of further exploring the concept of 
student cooperative management of family 
housing. 

There was no further business to come before the Com- 
mittee and the meeting was adjourned at 12:00. 



lEladyl Keith Hardy 



Hardy 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



Stu. Affairs 
10-1-75 



4 7 00 



PRESENT: 



Welcome to 
Former Trustee 
Haigis 



Tuition 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

October 1, 1975; 11:00 a.m. 
Room CC1-14, Medical Sciences Building 
University of Massachusetts/Worcester 

Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Healey; President Wood; 
Trustees Carlson, Croce, Robertson, Rowland, Spiller, Troy; 
Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Not Present: Trustees Gordon, Shaler , and Weldon 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice President for 
Academic Affairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; 
Mr. Cooley, Assistant Vice President for Analytical Studies; Mrs. 
Hanson, Associate Budget Director; Mr. Kaplan, Assistant Vice 
President for Organization and Management; Mr. White, Assistant 
to the President 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Professor Wilkinson, Faculty 
Representative 

UM/ Bo st on : Chancellor Golino 

UM/Worcester : Acting Dean Butcher; Dr. Wheeler, Chairman of 
Department of Surgery and Hospital Chief of Staff 

Invited Guest : Mr. John Haigis, former Trustee 

The meeting was called to order at 11:05 a.m. Chairman 
Healey welcomed Mr. John Haigis, former Trustee, and said he in- 
tended to express formal recognition of his service on the Board 
at the full Board meeting. Chairman Healey then spoke briefly 
about a letter which he had received from Trustee Eddy about a 
letter he, the Chairman, had written to Professor David Booth, 
Secretary of the UM/Amherst Faculty Senate, explaining the posi- 
tion of the Board with respect to the University as a multicampus 
system. He explained that he had written the letter at the re- 
quest of Secretary Booth for the purpose of setting the stage 
for a discussion between the Faculty Senate Rules Committee and 
the Executive Committee on this subject. He said he had hoped 
that the letter would help bring the issues into sharper focus 
for the faculty meeting with the Executive Committee. 

Chairman Healey called on President Wood, who spoke on 
the tuition study prepared by the Planning Office which had been 
distributed to the members of the Committee. In view of the 
sentiments of members of the Board, he said, it would not be 
appropriate for him to address any specific level of tuition at 
this time. He had hoped instead to provide the members with an 
opportunity to express their views on the subject for his guid- 
ance. The Chancellors and the Acting Dean will also be asked 
to get comments and reactions from the campuses. The President 



' 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

added that he would still like to try to get concerted action 
with the other segments of public higher education. 

The document showed, said the President, the conse- 
quences of an adjustment in tuition levels sufficient to bring 
the combined tuition and fees of UM/Amherst to the twentieth 
and tenth percentile of the 110 state land grant universities 
and colleges. A discussion of the options should, he said, 
include, in addition to the University's comparative position, 
consideration of the uses of the tuition waiver and of financial 
aid in mitigating the effect of any substantial increase on 
lower-income students. He said he had asked Mr. Lynton and the 
Budget Office to develop a financial aid analysis. 

Chairman Healey suggested that the Board must examine 
critically the legal possibilities for tuition waivers as a form 
of financial aid. General Counsel was directed to research this 
question. Another question, he said, was the feasibility of 
the Board's taking the task of determining the individual finan- 
cial need of a large number of students. 

Trustee Spiller cited figures in the tuition paper and 
asked if it were a fact that one-third of the tuition payable to 
the University was waived. Mr. Lynton pointed out that much of 
the amount waived was in the form of legislatively-mandated 
waivers to veterans, and Treasurer Johnson added that the figures 
in the paper were based on conditions as they existed before the 
Board tightened its waiver policy in the spring. The proportion 
waived in the present academic year, said Mr. Johnson, would be 
much less. Mr. Lynton also made the point that waivers were not 
at present used as a form of financial aid. 

Trustee Robertson asked how much was spent per student 
in the University. It was observed by several Trustees that such 
cost of education figures were various and common, but because 
the factors used in such calculations vary among institutions, 
their representativeness was questionable. Trustee Robertson 
also asked why nonresident graduate students pay less tuition 
than nonresident undergraduates, while resident graduate students 
pay more than resident undergraduates. The President replied thai: 
the Graduate School had traditionally felt that a national pool 
of graduate students helps the quality of the graduate work. He 
questioned whether that assumption was still valid with less com- 
petition nationally for graduate students of the highest caliber. 
Professor Wilkinson agreed that there was less competition of 
this sort than there had been as recently as two years ago. 

Trustee Spiller pointed to the two alternatives pre- 
sented in the tuition paper — raises to the twentieth or tenth 
percentile — and questioned whether that would be a sufficient 
raise, since even if the University's tuition were in the twen- 
tieth percentile, it would be near the bottom of New England 
public universities. He suggested that the comparative sampling 



4701 

Exec. Comm. 
10-1-75 



4702 



Exec. Comm. 
10-1-75 



UM/Worcester — 

Statement of 

Goals 

(Doc. T76-010) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

should focus on New England institutions, rather than on a 
national sample, and suggested that a presentation of alternative 
levels be based on the twelfth, tenth, and eighth percentiles. 
Mrs. Robinson commented that since the ranking concerned only 110 
institutions, the dollar differences among these three percentiles! 
would be insignificant. 

Chancellor Bromery remarked that the tuition paper 
lacked one thing that he deemed important : a rationale for a 
raise in tuition. A discussion followed about the difficulty 
of computing tuition on the basis of a students' ability to pay, 
or by relationship to peer institutions with which the University 
should remain comparable, or by relationship to educational costs. 
Chancellor Bromery stressed the importance of not connecting the 
tuition to the budget request. 

All present agreed that the tuition should not be tied 
to the budget. At the same time, it was observed that the con- 
troversy surrounding the budget request in the public media made 
it difficult to defend the present level of tuition, especially 
when the process of selective admissions tends to bring to the 
University students who can afford to attend private institutions 
This was why, the Chairman said, any raise in tuition would have 
to be coupled with a capacity to lessen its impact through waiver 
or financial aid, so that those who can pay more will be required 
to do so without penalizing the genuinely deprived students at 
the University. 



After further discussion, it was agreed that President 
Wood would present the Committee with more than one option, and 
that the Committee would plan to make a recommendation to the 
full Board for action at least by the December meeting. Trustees! 1 
recommendations, in the meantime, would be forwarded to Vice 
President Robinson. 



Speaking on the Statement of Goals of the Worcester 
campus (Doc. T76-010) , President Wood described the document as 
a serious, thoughtful, collegial effort on the part of the fac- 
ulty and administration of the Medical School to show to the 
public the direction which the Medical School is taking. He 
said it had been influential in strengthening the University's 
position in the Legislature. Chairman Healey commended the 
statement for its emphasis on the fact that the Medical School 
had been committed from the very beginning to training physi- 
cians who would treat patients, in preference to those who would 
do research. At the same time, several Trustees observed that 
the statement makes clear the necessity for a faculty of spe- 
cialists, in order to give primary care practitioners a well- 
rounded training which would enable them not only to excel in 
their field, but also to know what lay beyond their competence. 
The observation was made that it was vitally important, in 
describing the Medical School's commitment to primary care, not 



F 



I 



1 



1 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

to give the impression that it is "a trade school for general 
practitioners . " 

Following this discussion, a motion was made and 
seconded at 12:10 p.m., and it was 

VOTED : To enter executive session to discuss personnel 
actions, honorary degrees, and the University 
Medal for Outstanding Service. 

At 12:50 p.m., it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To end the executive session. 

After the executive session, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
whereas the administrative ditues of Dr. 
William R. Hamilton, Jr., as Vice Chancellor 
for Administration and Finance at the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts at Boston have precluded 
him from sustaining his scholarly efforts in 
his discipline, he be granted administrative 
leave for one academic year commencing Sep- 
tember 1, 1976, at half pay, in order that he 
may become current with the developments which 
have occurred in his field. 

VOTED : To recommend that, in commendation of his many 
and distinguished contributions to the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts, the Board of Trustees 
award the University Medal for Outstanding 
Service to Dr. Reginald W. Butcher and present 
the award at a suitable occasion. 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees confirm 
as recipients for Honorary Degrees to be awarded 
at the UM/Amherst 1976 Commencement those can- 
didates approved in Executive Session of the 
Executive Committee of this date and instruct 
the Chancellor of the campus to proceed with 
necessary arrangements. 

There was no further business to come before the Com- 
mittee, and the meeting was adjourned at 12:51 p.m. 



4708 



Exec. Comm. 
10-1-75 



Executive 
Session 



ftladyl Keith Hardy * 



Hardy 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4 704 



PRESENT: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES 0E MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

October 1, 1975; 12:30 p.m. 
Room Al-1, Medical Sciences Building 
University of Massachusetts/Worcester 

Chairman Troy, Trustees Breyer, Morgenthau and Snowden; Mr. 
Callahan representing Trustee Anrig 

The meeting was called to order at 12:30 p.m. Chair- 
man Troy presented the Tentative Graduation Lists for September 
1975 at UM/Amherst (Doc. T76-009) . There being no discussion, 
a motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
and ratify the preliminary Graduation Lists of 
September 1, 1975, UM/Amherst, as certified by 
the recorder of that campus and as set forth in 
Doc. T76-009. 

There was no other business to come before the Com- 
mittee, and the meeting was declared adjourned at 12:35 p.m. 



f 



lAladyC Keith Hardy ° 



I 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



I 



■■^ 



1 



PRESENT: 



ABSENT: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON LONG-RANGE PLANNING 

October 10, 1975; 1:30 p.m. 
Room 917, Campus Center 
University of Massachusetts/Amherst 

Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Rowland, President Wood; 
Trustees Carlson, Rothenburger , Troy; Secretary Hardy; Miss 
Eichel, recorder 

Advisory Council on the Fine Arts : Professor James Ackerman, 
Chairman; Mr. Schuyler Chapin, Ms. Joy Dewey, Ms. Iva Hiatt, 
Dr. Michael Miller, Mr. William Moyer, Mr. John Nolan, Mr. 
Robert Sagalyn, Mr. Frederick Steinway, Mr. Peter Smith, Dr. 
Frederick Tillis 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice President for 
Academic Affairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Professor Wilkinson, Faculty 
Representative; Ms. Stack, Graduate Student Representative 

Trustees Anrig, Clark, Robertson, Spiller and Weldon 

Chairman Rowland called the meeting to order at 1:30 
p.m. She said that the first item on the agenda was a further 
discussion of Enrollment Planning at UM/Amherst. She suggested 
that open and full deliberation of complex issues such as enroll- 
ment was a principal function of the Committee, had proved valu- 
able in the past, and she welcomed such a discussion today. In 
accordance with the charge to the Committee, she said, several 
meetings had been held for the purpose of setting priorities and 
enrollment limits for the campuses. The Committee, she said, 
would not concern itself with what the programs should be except 
as those programs relate to the total enrollment of the campus 
and reflect the priorities recommended by the Committee. 

At the request of Chairman Rowland, President Wood 
commented on the draft policy statement provided to the Committee 
earlier in the day. He said he would be reluctant to endorse 
the student mix proposed in the draft statement until he knew 
the results of the campus program review now underway. He said 
he would also like to see an analysis of applications and ad- 
missions data. Chancellor Bromery informed the Committee that 
the campus program review committee had developed criteria for 
measuring the value of the various programs and was at the pre- 
sent time applying that criteria to existing programs. Chairman 
Rowland requested that data on programs, applications and ad- 
missions be furnished to the Committee for review at the next 
meeting. The need for input on programs from the campuse before 
guidelines were established was emphasized. Although the earlier 
recommendations from the campus had dealt with proposed enrollmen 



4 705 






UM/Amherst- 

Enrollment 

Planning 



4706 



L-RP Comm. 
10-10-75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

i limits and student mix, it had not contained information on pro- 
gram options. 

Vice President Robinson asked if the proposed ratio of 
upper to lower division undergraduate enrollment took into con- 
sideration the projected decrease in the number of high school 
graduates going on to higher education. Chancellor Bromery 
responded affirmatively, adding that at the present time many 
applicants must be turned away because of lack of space. 

President Wood stated that there were two issues at 
stake: 1) whether the state of the reasonably traditional fresh- 
man market was such that it should be stabilized or cut back, and 
2) whether advanced degrees in arts and sciences and the profes- 
sional schools had reached critical size. He said he wished to 
make sure that the strength of the graduate demand is a result 
of the programs' being nationally attractive and not the result 
of the University's artificially subsidizing graduate students 
for the sake of program expansion. Since University programs 
at the undergraduate level currently attract students from rea- 
sonably well-off families, he said, restricting freshman growth 
could tend to penalize the low and lower-middle-income applicants. 
He said the issue must be faced as to whether the University 
should accept more undergraduate students at the expense of 
graduate students. 

In response to a query, Chancellor Bromery reviewed 
briefly the admissions process at UM/Amherst. He said many stu- 
dents have to be turned away because of the lack of sufficient 
financial aid. 

It was suggested that it would be useful to the Com- 
mittee to know how large the transfer demand is and what per- 
centage of the transfer students come from community colleges. 
Professor Wilkinson replied that one third of the transfer stu- 
dents were from the community college sector but he did not know 
offhand the percentage of the junior class represented by trans- 
fer students. 



Chancellor Bromery informed the Committee that if under 
graduate students leave the University in good standing, they 
are automatically readmitted should they desire to return. He 
suggested that some constraints should be put on this policy, 
such as limiting the time lapse between the date of drop-out and 
the date of return as a member in good standing. He added that 
in times of economic stress more students are likelt to remain 
for their junior and senior years in the institution where they 
entered as freshmen, thereby limiting the number of transfer 
students who can be accommodated. 

Trustee Carlson suggested that should it become nec- 
essary to decrease the total enrollment, it might then be 



i 



1 



f 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

necessary or desirable to change the student mix. In this 
regard, said Mr. Lynton, consideration should be given to which 
students could be accommodated at other institutions. Trustee 
Carlson inquired if figures were available which would show the 
direct charges of the instructional costs of various programs; 
if so, he said he would like to see the trend over the last five 
years with regard to graduate and undergraduate education. Presi- 
dent Wood added that graduate programs must be examined to deter- 
mine whether they are of sufficient size and value to warrant 
the investment. Trustee Troy agreed, but emphasized the impor- 
tance of informing citizens of the Commonwealth of the value of 
the various graduate programs. He said it would be unfortunate 
to terminate an excellent program simply because it was expensive 

Trustee Carlson said that the goals at UM/ Amherst 
should not necessarily be changed, but the enrollment goals and 
student mix would undoubtedly have to be revised to accommodate 
reduced resources. He added that he believes there are program 
options which will allow the University to gear down, and that 
these options must be exercised. He said that an increase in 
graduate students accompanied by a decrease in undergraduate 
enrollment was extremely difficult to defend. 

Mrs. Robinson pointed out that the lower division stu- 
dents do have other educational opportunities, such as enrollment 
in state and community colleges and that also the number of high 
school graduates will be decreasing in future years. The latter 
condition, however, it was noted would probably not affect demand 
for space until 1983. In addition, increased costs of education 
would tend to send lower income students to community colleges 
in order to reduce the total cost of their educations. 



Mr. Lynton reiterated the urgent need for program 
review, and Chancellor Bromery indicated that he would be happy 
to provide data to the Committee. Mr. Lynton asked that any data 
provided distinguish between the cost of master's and doctoral 
programs . 

Trustee Carlson suggested planning based on the budget 
levels which can be anticipated in the foreseeable future, to 
which Mrs. Robinson replied that although the University would 
have to function within the budgetary limits, she would not like 
to see the long-range planning goals tied to the budget. She 
stated her belief that the goals should reflect what is desirable 
within reason, if not immediately obtainable. Discussion ensued 
about possible options and which factors should be dominant 
among these options. Professor Wilkinson asked that when the 
Committee considers the cost of graduate programs, it not lose 
sight of the part graduate students play in the education of 
undergraduates. He said that graduate education is not, there- 
fore, in conflict with but rather supportive of undergraduate 
education. 



4 707 



L-RP Comm. 
10-10-75 



n 



4 7 08 



L-RP Coram. 
10-10-75 



Report of Ad- 
visory Council 
on the Arts 



Graduate/ 

Undergraduate 

Programs 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Rowl aid concluded discussion with the state- 
ment that UM/Amherst has reached the point where growth is less 
important than quality of programs and that further discussion 
of enrollment goals and student mix, together with discussion 
of the current policy of automatic readmission of drop-out stu- 
dents who were in good scholastic standing, would continue at 
the next meeting of the Committee. 

Chancellor Bromery requested an outline of the kinds 
of data which the campus should forward to the Committee for dis- 
cussion at the next meeting. 

At 2:30, members of the Advisory Council on the Fine 
Arts and other guests joined the meeting. At the request of the 
Chairman, Vice President Lynton introduced the members of the 
Fine Arts Council to the Committee. 

Chairman Rowland said that a year ago she had met with 
the Council to hear their plans. Since that time, she said, the 
Council had submitted reports of their activities, and the Com- 
mittee would now like to hear from the Council members their 
impressions of their last year's work and their plans for the 
coming year. She said she would like the Council to add to its 
other functions that of advice and consultation to the University 
on ways to improve the art acquisitions program — to act as an 
advisory board to the campuses. 

Chairman Rowland then called on President Wood, who 
welcomed the Council members and said that the formal opening 
of the Fine Arts Center later in the evening represented a major 
event for the University. He said the arts are especially im- 
portant in times of economic depression. The Council was not 
expected to come to terms with the University's fiscal problems; 
rather, the issue for the Council was the role of the fine arts 
in the life of the University. He said the Council should give 
guidance for long-range planning. 

Mr. Ackerman, Chairman of the Council and Professor of 
Arts History at Harvard, expressed his appreciation for Presi- 
dent Wood's comments regarding the Council's task since, he said, 
Council members had been concerned that it might not be possible 
to implement their proposals due to fiscal constraints. He said 
the Council had discussed the fine arts in three categories: 
1) graduate programs, 2) undergraduate programs, and 3) Fine 
Arts Center. He asked members to report on their field of spe- 
cial interest. 

Mr. Miller, Associate Dean of the School of the Arts, 
New York University, said that fine arts programs had come along 
late in the order of things at the University and that they — 
especially theater — would have a struggle both for survival and 
growth, which would take time. He said the interest was there, 
but the need for resources is great. 



» 



I 



1 



4 7 09 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Nolan, President of the Massachusetts College of 
Art, said the Council recognized a need for balance between 
professional and nonprofessional programs. Arts programs at UM/ 
Boston are general in nature, with an emphasis on teaching and 
an attempt to provide exposure to the greatest possible number 
of undergraduate students. At UM/Amherst, the graduate programs 
offer professional training, while the undergraduate programs 
have been moving from broad programs resulting in the B.A. degree 
to more professional programs working toward the B.F.A. degree. 
At the same time, the practice has been growing at UM/Amherst, 
he said, to offer broad lower-level undergraduate programs which 
lear to programs of intensive art education in the junior and 
senior years. Mr. Ackerman added that the best professional 
schools want advanced students. 

Mr. Smith, Director of the Hopkins Center, Dartmouth 
College, said the Council had discussed the possibility that 
resources should be reallocated in favor of undergraduate pro- 
grams, while retaining faculty capability for helping talented 
students. Mr. Tillis, Professor of Music and Associat Provost, 
UM/Amherst, stated his belief that although this is not a time 
to stress graduate education, a good undergraduate program in 
dependent upon graduate programs, since without the graduate 
programs it is more difficult to attract superior faculty. 

Ms. Dewey, Director of Dance, Williams College, praised 
the dance program, mentioning that the University dance program 
tours the state, as does the Five-College dance program. The 
latter, she said, received money from the Massachusetts Council 
on the Arts for a tour. She added that in areas such as dance, 
programs can be run in conjunction with the urban center. Mr. 
Tillis said that a significant step has been taken in the pro- 
posal to move the Department of Dance from the School of Phys- 
ical Education to the School of Humanities and Fine Arts. Ms. 
Dewey said that plans are under way to create a Five-College 
dance department. 

Ms. Hiatt, Professor of Music, Smith College, said that 
there is a great deal of collaboration and conversation among 
the Five Colleges, especially in areas of the arts. Students 
can take courses at any of the consortium institutions, and there 
is a program of faculty exchange. The Five-College music chair- 
men meet regularly to discuss programs. Mr. Moyer, Personnel 
Manager of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, stated that the Council 
is not yet in a position to comment with specificity on the UM/ 
Boston music program. However, he said, the issue of the appro- 
priate emphasis on professional graduate work in a university is 
a very important consideration. Since the outlets for professional 
musicians, for instance, are few, there is an obligation not to 
encourage too many into professional graduate work. He stated 
that unless a graduate program was superb, there would be little 
promise for its graduates. 



L-RP Comm. 
10-10-75 



4 710 



L-RP Comm. 
10-10-75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Ackerman noted that on both campuses the number of 
students in art courses is growing, and the number of students 
turned away is staggering; and that, therefore, there is a 
critical need for more offerings in the fine arts. He then turner 
discussion from graduate and undergraduate programs to the role 
of the Fine Arts Center. 

The Center, he said, has the propensity to be the 
dominating influence in arts education at UM/ Amherst. One problem 
is that the Center will require year-round use in order to support: 
the maintenance costs, and another problem has been caused by 
deficiencies in the sound and lighting in the building. Mr. 
Steinway said shortages in the budget have caused these problems 
since money has been needed to equip both the academic departments 
and the performing arts facilities — the concert and recital halls 
— before the academic programs can function properly. 

Mrs. Robinson explained the complex and long-standing 
problems which had led to the current situation and said that 
the only way to finish the building is by the use of capital out- 
lay money, the "non-availability" of which has necessitated 
borrowing from departmental equipment budgets. 

Turning back to the subject of programs, Mr. Ackerman 
noted the Council's recommendation that graduate programs be 
reviewed, particularly the theater program at Amherst and the 
theater arts program at UM/Boston. Attention should be paid 
during such reviews to counterpart programs on the separate cam- 
puses. Trustee Carlson asked if there was any real potential for 
joint use of the facilities; for instance, he asked, would it be 
practical to have students from UM/Boston go to UM/Amherst for 
work in a particular field rather than to have two self-sustaining 
programs? Mr. Steinway replied that it was necessary to deter- 
mine what options were available. He said he could see the 
possibility of an exchange of part-time faculty and visiting 
artists, and time periods (less than semesters) where students 
could go to a particular campus for a particular type of activity. 



Mrs. Robinson asked if the Council could speak to the 
long-range resource implications of the various programs. Mr. 
Miller said the Council agreed that this is a critical question. 
Using theater as an example of how important it is to consider 
the long-range questions, he said the graduate program in theater 
describes itself as a combination of training in theory, history 
and research, as well as professional practice for those who 
feel they can contribute something in this field. He said that 
such a program requires a large and specialized faculty and a 
great deal of space. Therefore, it must be determined whether 
the campus has the current or potential capacity in terms of 
money and facilities to meet these goals, when 99 percent of the 
undergraduate students will not use their education in profes- 
sional way. 



I 



t 



I 



4711 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mrs. Robinson called attention to the fact that a sub- 
stantial amount is currently being invested by the City of Boston 
in the Strand Theater in Dorchester and the community is concernec 
that the University not build competitive facilities of plan 
competitive programs in theater. 

Secretary Hardy said that it is important to consider 
University programs, and particularly programs at UM/Boston, in 
the context of what other colleges and universities, such as the 
Boston Eight Consortium, and what other cultural institutions 
are offering. Trustee Troy commented that campus programs should! 
also be reviewed with an eye toward potential interrelationships; 
for instance, a course taught by the English Department might 
provide a resource for the theater program. 

In response to a question from Trustee Carlson as to 
what action was contemplated with regard to these important 
issues, Dr. Lynton said that graduate program reviews are under- 
way on the Amherst campus and that review of the theater program 
is scheduled this fall. With regard to coordination, Mr. Steinwa""- 
commented that the Fine Arts Center actually has seven units. 
Not only can education and professional training in each of the 
arts be coordinated, but departments can develop joint projects 
and have the opportunity for exchange. Thus, he said, the Fine 
Arts Center is not a mini-performing arts center, but a totally 
integrated complex which allow interaction amont the various art 
fields and provides an opportunity for first-class performances, 
such as that of the Boston Symphony. 

Mr. Ackerman said Mr. Pincus, Associate Professor of 
Architecture, M.I.T., had written a report on Cinema Studies 
which indicated that care should be taken so that any expansion 
in this area would be coupled with capability in film production. 

With regard to teacher preparation, Mr. Nolan stated 
there are two programs at UM/Amherst — one within the School of 
Education and one within the Fine Arts Department, both very 
good. Ms. Dewey observed that there has been a lack of communi- 
cation between the School of Education and the Arts Department. 
Mr. Nolan praised the summer in-service program for teachers of 
the arts, and said that, although the general market for teachers 
is not good, the demand is greatest for art teachers, especially 
at the junior high level. 

The next topic considered by the Council, said Mr. 
Ackerman, was the need for cooperation both across disciplines 
withint the campuses and between campuses and other institutions. 
Chairman Rowland stated that in Boston there are many opportu- 
nities for joint efforts with professional groups. 

President Wood said that while cooperation within the 
Five-College group is strong, cooperation with other arts 



L-RP Comm. 
10-10-75 



4712 



L-RP Comm. 
10-10-75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

institutions is sporadic and not yet productive. He said he 
would like to see the Council look at this area in greater 
detail. 

Mr. Nolan added that he would like to see more inter- 
institutional cooperation and more scholarships provided to 
talented students so that they could take advantage of the best 
programs regardless of the institution. 

Mr. Ackerman concluded that it is the hope of the 
Council that in the course of the year they can produce a final 
report and follow up on the report with further discussions with 
the Trustees. 

President Wood stated that he was impressed with the 
diversity of the members on the Council and that the report this 
afternoon was evidence of the utility of the Council. He said 
he anticipated a continuing relationship between the Council and 
the University. The proposed schedule, he said, would be satis- 
factory. The Council should comment on size, structure and fre- 
quency of programs, he said, and it is important that the campuses 
view the Council as supportive of their work and not sitting in 
judgment of it. 

Mr. Ackerman said the Council expects to require more 
money in FY 1976 since subcommittees will be traveling more to 
look at specific programs. The President indicated that the 
University would furnish staff support and money as the budget 
permits . 



Chairman Rowland thanked the members of the Council and 
adjourned the meeting at 4:30 p.m. 



i 



^GladyJ ] 



Keith Hardy I 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



f 



} 






PRESENT: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

October 22, 1975; 10:00 a.m. 
Office of the President 
One Washington Mall 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Trustees and Trustee Staff : President Wood; Chairman Troy; 
Trustee Morgenthau and Mr. Callahan representing Trustee Anrig; 
Secretary Hardy; Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice President for 
Academic Affairs; Mrs. Wolfman, Assistant Vice President for 
Academic Programs 

UM/ Amherst : Mr. Alfange, Acting Vice Chancellor for Academic 
Affairs and Provost; Mr. Bischoff, Associate Provost; Mr. Chappelf., 
Acting Dean of the Graduate School; Mr. Fischer, Acting Dean of 
the School of Education; Ms. Craig, Acting Associate Dean of the 
School of Education; Professor Wilkinson, Faculty Representative 

UM/ Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Babcock, Acting Vice Chancello 
for Academic Affairs and Provost; Professor Marshall, Faculty 
Representative 

UM/Worcester : Dr. Smith, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and 
Provost 

The meeting was called to order at 10:15 a.m. Chairman 
Troy turned first to the proposed Appointment of Dean of Faculty 
of Natural Sciences and Mathematics at UM/Amherst (Doc. T76-016) . 



4713 



UM/Amherst — 
Appointment of 
Dean of Natural 



(Doc. T76-016) 



Vice President Lynton began the discussion by saying that Seymour] Sciences and 

Shapiro was a distinguished and valued member of the Amherst fac- Mathematics 

ulty, and that he and the President hoped that the Trustees would 

concur with the Chancellor's appointment. Mr. Alfange agreed 

strongly with Mr. Lynton' s statement. He said that Professor 

Shapiro had won the University Medal for Outstanding Service, and 

had selflessly devoted himself to the University since he had 

joined the faculty in 1964. He wished to return to teaching, but 

his colleagues would not let him. The Search Committee had not 

considered him as a candidate originally, but when the candidate 

who had been offered the job would not take it because the salary 

was not adequate, Professor Shapiro had agreed to be a candidate. 

The Search Committee had unanimously recommended him. 

Chairman Troy said that he had come to know Professor 
Shapiro well, that he had appeared before the Committee many 
times, and he described him as the "total faculty person." 
There was no further discussion, and upon motion made and sec- 
onded, it was 



4 714 

F&EP Comm. 
10-22-75 



UM/ Amherst — 
Transfer of 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
it concur with the appointment by the Chan- 
cellor of the Amherst campus of Professor 
Seymour Shapiro as Dean of the Faculty of 
Natural Sciences and Mathematics. 



Humanities 



Chairman Troy next asked for a status report on the 
Transfer of Dance from the School of Physical Education to the 
Dance to Faculty Faculty of Fine Arts and Humanities. Mr. Alfange explained that 
of Fine Arts and both faculties had agreed to this change, and though it had in 

practice taken place, the necessary formal ratification of the 
College of Arts and Sciences had not occurred. All members of 
the Faculty Senate Academic Affairs Committee have not as yet 
been elected, and this has delayed the process. But he said he 
could not conceive of any substantial objection being raised 
once that process was put into motion. 



Implementation 
of Academic Per- 
sonnel Policy 
(Doc. T75-125) 



The third matter for the Committee was that of a 
Report on the Implementation of the Academic Personnel Policy 
(Doc. T75-125) . Chairman Troy asked Mr. Lynton to present an 
overview. Mr. Lynton said that the June meeting of the Board 
had adopted the policy with the provision that it be reviewed 
within a year. In the meantime, however, the policy was to be 
implemented and reports of this made to the Board. The two 
components of implementation were to be: (1) that the Provost 
would brief deans and all involved in the several levels of 
campus personnel reviews of the procedural standards required 
by the new policy, and (2) that the campuses develop and apply 
campus-level implementation procedures. 

Professor Marshall stated that the document caused 
substantial anxiety on the Boston campus. She said that the 
Assembly Steering Committee was presently getting faculty views 
on it , and she said she hoped that a careful review of the docu- 
ment would take faculty input into account. At Trustee Morgen- 
thau's request, Mr. Lynton described the process by which the 
document had been developed. He explained that for several 
reasons, the Boston campus felt that it did not have adequate 
input into the development of the policy, while the Amherst 
campus had had extensive discussion and had in fact made sug- 
gestions for 53 changes. Thus the two campuses were at cross- 
purposes over the timing of Trustee action on the document. 
As a result, the Trustees had decided to adopt the document with 
the provision for review within the year. 

Trustee Morgenthau asked why the Boston faculty had 
not reviewed the document sufficiently. Several persons ex- 
plained that it had to do with the different governance struc- 
ture between the two campuses, and the importance which the 
Boston faculty places on everyone's participating in the dis- 
cussions. There followed a long discussion of the advantages 
and disadvantages of the Boston governance system and its effect 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

on this and other faculty efforts to address what are specifi- 
cally faculty issues. Chancellor Golino stressed that nobody 
on the Boston campus questioned the need for such a personnel 
policy. 

Dr. Smith told the Trustees that the Worcester Campus 
had not yet put its governance system into effect. It had de- 
veloped a governance document, and this document together with 
the Personnel Policy had been sent to the faculty for their 
comment. He said that the campus was now at work on the imple- 
mentation guidelines for the document. At this, Chairman Troy 
asked what implementation procedures the other campuses had 
applied thus far. 

Mr. Alfange said that the Amherst campus had followed 
two steps: (1) When the time came for personnel actions, he 
sent a memorandum to each level of review explaining and remind- 
ing the appropriate individuals of the use and meaning of the 
document, and (2) he had held meetings with the deans to explain 
the changes from previous years which the document entailed. 

Mr. Babcock, speaking for the Boston campus, stated 
that he had written a document outlining the proper procedures 
for implementation at each level, and he had reviewed the docu- 
ment with the deans. Trustee Morgenthau asked about faculty in- 
put into the review of the policy. Mr. Babcock replied that both 
he and Professor Marshall believed that current plans for dis- 
cussions and hearings would permit sufficient faculty input to 
the process by spring. 

Mr. Alfange said that the Amherst campus Academic Per- 
sonnel Policies Committee would review campus procedures within 
overall University policy and present them to the Board. Chair- 
man Troy asked if this was to be the UM/Boston procedure, and 
Mr. Babcock answered that the implementation of the policy was 
primarily a collegiate matter, but that the process was well 
along. 

Mr. Babcock returned to the subject of governance on 
the Boston campus to say that the reason that there were depart- 
mental constitutions, collegiate constitutions and an assembly 
constitution was that it had been felt that the faculty should 
be as close as possible to policy development. The problem with 
this, he said, was that when there was disagreement between the 
departments and the colleges, the inherent lack of symmetry in 
the system tended to cause delays. Still, there was the feeling 
that this system should be maintianed if at all possible. Pro- 
fessor Marshall said that there was good philosophical basis for 
this governance system. President Wood remarked that he was 
also committed to participatory democracy, but he said that the 
difficulty was sorting out what issues and problems the faculty, 



4715 



F&EP Coram, 
10-22-75 



4716 



F&EP Comm. 
10-22-75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the colleges and departments appropriately deal with and what 
issues realistically must be dealt with by others at other levels. 

UM/Amherst — Chairman Troy turned next to the progress reports on 

Academic Reviews the Academic Reviews of the School of Education — UM/Amherst. Mr 
of School of Lynton proposed that the discussion fall into three parts: (1) ■<. 
Education discussion of the reports, particularly reactions to them from 

the campus, (2) a discussion of the status quo of the School and 
of the plans for the future, and (3) a broad discussion of the 
general aims and goals of the School. As background, Mr. Lynton 
explained to those present that the two Committees — the Visiting 
Committee for the School of Education and the Faculty Senate Ad 
Hoc Review Committee — had been appointed as a response to sensa- 
tional charges about the School. Their reports had been completec 
and provided to the Trustees early in August, and this was the 
first opportunity for a discussion. 

Mr. Alfange commented that he believed that the reports 
had been widely read and, on the whole, that they were fair and 
balanced. Acting Dean Fischer said that the School of Education 
agrees generally with Mr. Alfange 's comment. As for the Faculty 
Senate Report, he said he believed that the analyses were better 
than the recommendation. The School will study them, implement 
some, and reject others. He said that the Goodlad report was 
much more significant with respect to recommendations for the 
future, and this had pleased the faculty of the School. 

Ms. Craig, Associate Acting Dean of the School, said 
that a School-wide Curriculum Committee was not in place to 
review the reports and was just beginning this effort. Chairman 
Troy asked if this Committee's discussions were aimed at any 
action. Mr. Fischer replied that it aimed at understanding first 
Chairman Troy said that the Trustees were interested in knowing 
what change was needed. Mr. Fischer remarked that this was 
probably a good time to mention the progress of the five com- 
mittees established by the Chancellor to follow up on the reports 

Associate Provost Bischoff reviewed these committees 
and their mandates which were: (1) a search committee for a 
new Dean, just recently assembled, (2) a task force on School 
governance, (3) and a task force on curriculum and programs 
within the school. Chairman Troy asked why it had taken so long 
to assemble a search committee for a new Dean, and Mr. Bischoff 
described what he called "arcane rituals" to be followed in this 
process. Continuing his description of the committees established 
by the Chancellor, Mr. Bischoff cited: (4) a standing committee 
composed of members not part of the School of Education faculty 
to monitor experimental programs, and (5) a committee to deter- 
mine the long-range plans of the School of Education. Chairman 
Troy asked for ths specific composition of this committee, and 
Mr. Bischoff explained that there would be four faculty members 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

of the School, two from the Faculty Senate Review Committee, 
other members from the Goodlad committee, and Associate Provost 
Woodbury of the Amherst campus. 

Chairman Troy asked why the work of this committee was 
expected to take six months, and Mr. Bischoff stated that no such 
study in his experience had taken less. Much discussion was 
needed, he said, and it was better to err on the side of too much 
discussion than too little. Mr. Lynton observed that a study of 
the purpose and practical validity of the School of Education — 
essentially a philosophical study — was not the kind that should 
take six months, unlike a study of curriculum and programs. 

President Wood said he hoped that the Senate and the 
House would soon vote out an FY 1976 budget and tax package. 
After that happened, he said, the process for the FY 1977 budget 
would begin immediately. In these circumstances, he said, it 
would be desirable to complete soon a study of the following 
issues: (1) What should be the undergraduate and graduate mix 
in the School of Education; (2) should the graduate enrollment 
be cut back because of the realities of the marketplace; (3) how 
would answers to these questions affect the faculty; (4) what 
should be the distinctive role of the School of Education; and 
(5) what should be the posture of the School with respect to 
that of the State Colleges. He remarked that if these questions 
are not answered by spring, with the new budget process under 
way, it might be too late. Both he and Mr. Lynton stressed the 
necessity for answers in a few months. Mr. Alfange said he did 
not believe that the campus was wedded to the projection of six 
months. Mr. Chappell informed the Committee that the Graduate 
School was engaged in a study of graduate enrollments and that 
the graduate enrollment of the School of Education was to be 
taken up next week. He said the results of this study would 
control spring admissions and would bring about substantial 
changes . 

Trustee Morgenthau asked President Wood to explain his 
remark about the relationships to the state colleges. The Presi- 
dent explained that the educational mission of the state colleges 
present the University with the questions of: (1) do we continue 
our undergraduate programs, and (2) should our graduate work 
have a distinctive mission. In the context of continuing resourc^ 
scarcity, said the President, answers as to the priorities in 
the work of the School are needed now. 

Chairman Troy pointed to the fact that the School had 
had more than a thousand education majors, and this with the 
great glut of teachers and the continuing production of teachers 
by the state colleges was a serious issue. What was the School 
doing about this? Ms. Craig said that the undergraduate enroll- 
ment had peaked about 1972 and that efforts to cut back had been 
instituted since then, both in numbers of programs and in students 



4717 



F&EP Comm. 
10-22-75 



4 718 



F&EP Comm. 
10-22-75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

in the programs. This was a difficult process in a public insti- 
tution, she said, but there were now 979 undergraduate education 
majors, including pre-education majors. Freshmen were no longer 
accepted as education majors. 

Mr. Callahan said that he had read both reports and 
he said he thought perhaps that Mr. Bischoff was not aware of 
what an embarrassment the School of Education events had proved 
to be to the University. He said he did not know what the impact i 
in financial terms would be, but he knew that the University was 
in serious trouble because of the views of many persons outside 
the University as a result of the problems of the School of Edu- 
cation. The President reiterated Mr. Callahan's remarks by ob- 
serving that the Medical School's statement of goald had been 
immensely effective in countering concerns on the outside that 
the Medical School was determined to produce superspecialized 
physicians. He said the outside voices had not quieted on the 
School of Education, and that the School was therefore terribly 
vulnerable. He added that while he had shared the enthusiasm 
of former Dean Allen for spontaneity in education, if the campus 
did not come to grips with the question of the size of the School 
soon, in a significant fashion, the University as a whole would 
have to. Time was critical, he concluded. 

Mr. Bischoff remarked at this point in the discussion 
on the issues which the President had mentioned of enrollment 
and programmatic emphasis, the School and the campus need and 
would welcome the President's and the Trustees' guidance, espe- 
cially in regard to the interface of programs with State and 
Community Colleges. He cited as most useful a previous occasion 
when the President's Office entered into arrangements with the 
other segments of higher education on nursing education. Tradi- 
tionally, he said, the Amherst campus has sought to provide 
education in areas which students experssed interest in — and the 
fact that this year there continues to be a large undergraduate 
enrollment indicates that they still choose to be education 
majors regardless of the state of the job market in that area. 
He said the campus was not in a position to calculate the role 
of the School of Education relative to the State Colleges, but 
would need the guidance and assistance of the Board. 



Several of the campus representatives explained that 
the campus had not been idle, and that the idea that the spirit 
of Dwight Allen was still controlling the School of Education 
was completely wrong. Mr. Alfange contrasted the receptive 
attitude of the Faculty of the School to the new academic reports 
with its reaction to the Fairbairn report of 1971 which was, he 
said, "Go to hell; we don't want your old-fogey ideas." Ms. 
Craig described the new procedures within the School for both 
fiscal and academic review of programs as they are submitted 
for funding in order to prevent overlap. Members of the Com- 
mittee described these positive steps for changes within the 
School as encouraging. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Chairman recognized Trustee Morgenthau, who had 
asked that the Committee have an opportunity to discuss the Hay 
Report. She said she realized there was not engouth time to do 
this at this meeting, but she asked that it be put on the agenda 
of the next meeting. Chairman Troy explained to the Committee 
that, although he had suggested to Trustee Morgenthau that the 
Hay Report was not per se a Faculty and Educational Policy Com- 
mittee issue, he agreed with Professor Wilkinson that its possible; 
academic implications were appropriate for a Committee discussion 

After a brief discussion of the format for such a dis- 
cussion, it was agreed that the proper context would be the 
academic implications of organization and centralization of the 
University, since this was a long-standing issue of the inter- 
action of governance and the administrative structure, which 
had apparently come to a head over the Hay Report. It was sug- 
gested that the Faculty Representatives should begin the discus- 
sion. The President predicted that once this discussion was 
completed and all parties were clear on the points of view of 
the others, major differences of opinion would persist. 

There was no further business to come before the Com- 
mittee and the meeting was therefore adjourned at 12:45. 



4719 



F&EP Comm, 
10-22-75 



I 



^tladysfl Keith Hardy " 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4 72 



PRESENT: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

October 22, 1975; 4:00 p.m. 
Office of the President 
One Washington Mall 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Trustees and Trustee Staff: Chairman Gordon, President Wood 



Trustees Dennis, Fielding, O'Keefe; Mr. Colby representing 
Trustee Winthrop , Mr. Wolf man representing Trustee Dukakis; 
Secretary Hardy, Treasurer Johnson; Ms. Eichel, recorder 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice President for 
Academic Affairs; Mr. O'Leary, Assistant University Counsel; 
Mr. Lewis, Staff Assistant, Office of the Budget 

UM/Amherst : Dr. Gage, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs; Mr. 
Gulko, Budget Director 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Professor Marshall, Faculty Repre- 
sentative 

UM/Worcester : Mr. Cathey, Controller 

Guests : Mr. Joseph Albert, Insurance Advisor; Mr. John Wood, 
Standish, Ayer & Wood, Investment Counsel; Mr. Frank Harrison, 
student 



ABSENT: Trustees Abrams, Robertson, Rowland, Weldon, Winthrop 



r 



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Report of Invest 
ment Counsel 



The meeting was called to order at 4:05 p.m. by Chairman 
Gordon. At the request of the Chairman, Mr. John Wood of Standish, 
Ayer & Wood reported on the University's investments. He said 
the Committee would receive statistical tables with the usual 
formal written report at a later date. The main item to deal 
with at the meeting, he said, was the investment of available 
cash. He referred to his letter to the Committee suggesting that 
these funds be invested in top-quality intermediate bonds. He 
said that the stock portfolio is up to 67 percent, which may be 
a little higher than necessary, and also, at the current time the 
spread between government bonds and ordinary corporate bonds is 
small. For these reasons he recommended the purchase of Federal 
Banks bonds selling at 101-3/8 with a yield of 8.55 percent, 
maturing in April, 1979. Treasurer Johnson informed the Com- 
mittee that although the amount currently available for the pur- 
chase of bonds is nearer to $20,000 than to the $25,000 he had 
anticipated, more money will be available within the next week 
to ten days, and he would like authorization to invest as much 
as $50,000 within the next 30 days in Federal Banks as funds 
become available, providing that there is no significant change 
in the market situation during the period in question. 



I 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer of the University, 
Kenneth W. Johnson, to invest during the next 
30 days a sum not to exceed $50,000 in Federal 
Banks bonds at 8.55 percent maturing April 1979. 

At the request of Chairman Gordon, Treasurer Johnson 
explained to the Committee the reason for the request from Stan- 
dish, Ayer & Wood for an increase in fees, as outlined in their 
letter of September 8, previously circulated to the Committee. 
He said that the University, as an educational client, had re- 
ceived a special rate from Standish, Ayer & Wood, and that there 
had been no fee increase since 1967. He explained that the Uni- 
versity paid the investment consultants two separate fees: (1) 
a fee for advice on the endowment fund and (2) a retainer for 
advice on the operating funds. He said that since certificates 
on deposit have become a good investment, the University has not 
required the advice of the Investment Counsel on the operating 
funds, and therefore, he recommended dropping this service, and 
using the money saved to offset the increase in the fee for 
advice on the endowment fund. In this way, the increase in fee 
could be absorbed without additional expense to the University. 
The Committee agreed. 

Chairman Gordon then requested Mr. Joseph Albert, 
Insurance Advisor, to bring the Committee up to date on insur- 
abce coverage for the Medical School and hospital. Mr. Albert 
said that in compliance with the instructions of the Committee 
at its last meeting, he had obtained insurance through the Massa- 
chusetts Joint Underwriters Association (JUA) for malpractice 
coverage for all employees at UM/Worcester , excluding practicing 
physicians, but including residents and students. The policy 
contains coverage for $1 million each individual/ $10 million 
aggregate, and $1 million/ $3 million for approximately 31 
residents. He said that since the residents will be rotating 
through the various Worcester hospitals, he had suggested that 
the UM/Worcester personnel talk with the various hospitals in- 
volved about the possibility of their hospitals obtaining mal- 
practice insurance for residence on some kind of cost-sharing 
basis. 

He said he had continued investigation, as requested 
by the Committee at its last meeting, but had not yet been suc- 
cessful in securing General Liability coverage for UM/Worcester 
at a price which he felt was reasonable. To date he said the 
best figures he would offer were $1 million coverage for a pre- 
mium of $56,000 and $300,000 for a premium of $42,500, both of 
which he felt were too high. He explained that when he had ob- 
tained the General Liability Insurance for the UM/Amherst and 



4 721 



Finance Comm, 
10-22-75 



Consultant Fee 



Report of In- 
surance Advisor 






172 2 

Finance Comm. 
10-22-75 



UM/Wo re ester — 
Authorization 
of Signature 
for Processing 
Blue Cross 
Draft 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

UM/Boston campuses, coverage was obtained to a limit of $300,000 
with additional coverage of $5 million for catastrophies under 
an umbrella policy, but that he could not find any company 
willing to provide the umbrella coverage for UM/Worcester . 

He said the University has now received notice of the 
cancellation of the umbrella policy for the Amherst and Boston 
campuses. The insurer, he said, claims that he was improperly 
advised of the extent of automobile exposure. Mr. Albert in- 
dicated his concern that this was a basis on the part of the 
insurer to increase the fees. The company is now asking an 
additional $7500 for the umbrella coverage. Mr. Albert said he 
was trying to bargain with the insurere, asking him to omit the 
automobile coverage but to include the Worcester campus. 

He said that in obtaining the malpractice and general 
liability coverage from two companies, there is the possibility 
of neither insurer accepting liability for a particular claim, 
in which case it would be necessary to seek resolution in the 
courts, a time consuming procedure. The question, he said, was 
whether the University would be willing to accept this risk due 
to the saving in cost. Several alternatives were suggested and 
further discussion ensued, the consensus being that the saving 
in premium costs was worth risking the grey area problem and 
that Mr. Albert should continue to pursue general liability in- 
surance for the Worcester campus at a rate that seems reasonable. 
It was suggested that Worcester-based insurance companies might 
be approached. 

Chairman Gordon then asked Mr. Cathey to explain the 
Blue Cross hospital draft. Mr. Cathey said that by availing 
itself of this option, the hospital can pay itself immediately 
upon completion of regular Blue Cross hospital claims, enabling 
the hospital to gain a substantial increase in its cash flow. 
In order to use this procedure, said Mr. Cathey, the signatures 
of those authorized to sign the drafts must be on file with Blue 
Cross. The Committee was requested to recommend that the Board 
of Trustees authorize the hospital to use the procedure and fur- 
ther authorize the Treasurer to approve three UM/Worcester em- 
ployees for signing the drafts. Trustee Dennis asked what in- 
ternal controls were provided to assure that the funds will be 
properly handled. Treasurer Johnson explained the division of 
the receipts and payments operations, which effectively prevent 
any misuse of the monies collected. There being no further ques- 
tions, on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees autho- 
rize the University of Massachusetts Teaching 
Hospital to utilize the Blue Cross draft pro- 
cedure for services billed Blue Cross patients. 
Further, to recommend that the Board of Trustees 
authorize the University of Massachusetts Trea- 
surer to approve three employees of the 



' 



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4 723 



Finance Comm, 
10-22-75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

UM/Worcester campus for the purpose of signing 

the Blue Cross drafts for services billed by 

the University of Massachusetts Teaching Hospital. 

At the request of Chairman Gordon, Mr. Cathey explained; UM/Worcester-- 
the status of hospital charges at UM/Worcester. He said the Status of Hos- 
Rate Setting Commission had approved a flat $50 fee for outpatieni pital Charges 
services, rather than the range of fees requested by UM/Worcester 
He said that Counsel O'Leary had appealed to the Rate Setting 
Commission for a revision of this fee. The Commission had es- 
tablished the flat fee in accordance with regulations for other 
state hospitals which, he said, have a more homogeneous type of 
patient. The University had requested a range of fees similar 
to those charged at other teaching hospitals. He said the Rate 
Setting Commission is now establishing a new set of regulations 
expected to be effective November 1, which will allow the hos- 
pital to charge fees based on the specific services rendered, 
as originally requested. 

Trustee Fielding commented that it has been the prac- 
tice of the Rate Setting Commission to cross-subsidize individ- 
ual charges, but that although this practice may continue, a 
close accounting will be required in the future as to the actual 
cost of the various services. He said he assumed that it was 
the intent of UM/Worcester to make the services self-sustaining. 
Mr. Cathey said that the start-up rates were established with 
three factors in mind: (1) the cost of the services rendered, 
(2) the rates charged for the services by the community hospi- 
tlas and (3) the rates charged for these services by the Boston 
teaching hospitals. Trustee Fielding asked if the fees for pri- 
mary care and referral services were the same. Mr. Cathey re- 
plied that there were different fees for different levels of 
care. Trustee Fielding said that the cost for services provided 
at a teaching hospital were substantially higher than the cost 
for the same services provided in a private physician's office. 
He said he realized the value of the education factor but thought 
the cost should be kept in mind when considering an expansion of 
services. Chairman Gordon explained that when rates were ori- 
ginally established, many factors were considered, such as the 
possibility of (1) taking patients away from other hospitals in 
the area if the rates were too low and (2) discouraging potential 
patients in the rates were too high. He said the final proposal 
had been an attempt to reconcile the various factors. Trustee 
Fielding said he agreed with the philosophy where outpatient 
charges were concerned but questioned whether the state agencies 
referring patients to the hospital should be forced to pay a 
premium for inpatient services in order not to be competitive 
with community hospitals. He suggested that the Committee 
could consider this subject further at another meeting. Chair- 
man Gordon said there would be continuing dialogue on this 
subject . 



4724 



Finance Comm. 
10-22-75 
Review of Sys- 
tems for Pro- 
cessing Grants 
and Contracts 



UM/Amherst — 
Discontinuance 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Wood, at the request of the Chairman, re- 
viewed briefly the status of the UM/Amherst School of Education. 
The President said that he, Chairman Gordon, the Treasurer, 
the Vice President for Academic Affairs and the auditors must 
meet to discuss the recommendations of the audit reports sub- 
mitted to the Committee in August and the restructuring of the 
general administrative processes of the University. He said that 
at the meeting of the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy 
earlier in the day, there had been a very productive discussion 
on the academic aspect of the School. He then asked Mr. Lynton 
to inform the Committee as to the progress being made on the 
academic portion of the review. 

Mr. Lynton replied that the campus had responded very 
actively by setting up a number of task forces to study the pro- 
grams of the School and that he thought by the end of the aca- 
demic year considerable progress would be made toward reorgani- 
zation of the School. Treasurer Johnson added that the revised 
guidelines for the administration of grants and contracts en- 
dorsed by the Board in April had been implemented, reviews of the 
Coopers & Lybrand report had occurred on all the campuses and 
that nearly all of the corrective measures recommended by the 
various audit reports had been implemented. 

Chairman Gordon reiterated his earlier statement that 
the Finance Committee and its Chairman would take this matter 
very seriously and will follow with interest the administration 
of the grants and contracts procedures. Trustee Dennis stated 
his wish, as an auditor by profession, to take an active interest 
in the review of accounting procedures. 

At the request of Chairman Gordon, Mr. Gulko introduced 
the next agenda item, the matter of Discontinuance of Student 



of Room Deposit Room Deposit Fee — UM/Amherst. He said that in 1970 the Trustees 
Fee had authorized the establishment of the room deposit fee (Doc. 

(See Doc. T70- T70-090) to facilitate the reservation system, but that since 
090) J that time the campus has initiated an advance registration pro- 

cedure and early billing; therefore, the fee is no longer nec- 
essary or desirable. He said that loss in revenue to the resi- 
dence halls will be compensated this year by increased occupancy, 
although in future years the students may be required to pay 
higher rents to offset the loss of revenue. He said that the 
students had indicated they would rather pay the nominal increase 
in rent than to pay the room deposit. Secretary Hardy, speaking 
for Trustee Rowland in her absence, asked if the acceptance of 
the possible increase was studentwide. Trustee O'Keefe said 
that the Tenants Association, the Rents Increase Committee and 
the Student Senate were all aware that the elimination of the 
room deposit might result in a small increase in rent and were 
in favor of the discontinuance of the deposit. On motion made 
and seconded, it was 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees amend 
Doc. T70-090, said document to be redesignated 
T70-090A, by striking out that section begin- 
ning on page two and ending on page three which 
begins with the words "In order to guarantee 
housing for a student in the residence halls..." 
and ends with the words, "... is authorized to 
formulate procedures and instructions to imple- 
ment this policy...," and further to recommend 
that all deposits paid under this section by 
students presently enrolled at the Amherst 
campus be refunded, any balance remaining in 
the student room deposit fund after all depos- 
its have been refunded to be made available 
to the residence hall system for student pro- 
gramming in FY 1977. 

The next item of business was the matter of two new 
endowment funds at UM/Amherst. At the request of Chairman Gordon 
Treasurer Johnson gave the Committee background information on 
the endowments. The first, the Charles Hiram Thayer Fund (Doc. 
(T76-012) was being established in memory of a long-time profes- 
sor in the College of Agriculture, and the second, the Homer J . 
Barr Memorial Fund (Doc. T76-013) was being established in 
memory of a wrestling coach, who had died suddenly last summer. 
He had been active in obtaining scholarships for students in the 
wrestling program. 

Trustee Dennis asked the Treasurer if he would explain 
the Trust Fund process. Treasurer Johnson reviewed briefly kinds 
of trust funds, such as endowment funds, student activities funds 
self-liquidating projects such as residence halls, and research 
funds. He indicated his willingness to go into more detail with 
Trustee Dennis at some time convenient for him. It was then 
moved, seconded and 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees estab- 
lishment of the Charles Hiram Thayer Fund in 
the amount of $3,052 as an endowment fund for 
the purpose of using the annual earned income 
to provide short-term emergency loans at no 
interest to students registered in the Stock- 
bridge School of Agriculture. Repayment of 
current outstanding loans issued by the exist- 
ing trust fund loan account shall be added to 
endowment principal; whereas, loans issued 
effective with the date of this vote shall be 
returned directly to the loan fund for imme- 
diate reissue. All loans must be approved by 
the Dean of the Stockbridge School of Agriculture. 

It was further moved, seconded and 



4725 

Finance Comm, 
10-22-75 



UM/Amherst — 
New Endowment 
Funds 



Charles Hiram 
Thayer Endow- 
ment Fund 
(Doc. T76-012) 



4 72 6 



Finance Comm. 
10-22-75 

Homer J. Barr 
Endowment Fund 
(Doc. T76-013) 



Trust Fund 
Interest 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees accept- 
ance of the Homer J. Barr Memorial Fund as an 
Endowment Fund for the purpose of making annual 
awards of $150.00 from income earned during the 
preceding fiscal year to students actively parti- 
cipating in the intercollegiate wrestling pro- 
gram at the Amherst Campus. Selection of the 
recipient shall be made by the subcommittee on 
athletic grants-in-aid of the Amherst Campus 
Committee on Financial Aid and Scholarships. 
Unused income remaining after annual awards 
have been made shall be added to the principal 
of the fund on June 30. 

Chairman Gordon asked Treasurer Johnson to introduce 
discussion of Trust Fund Interest. Treasurer Johnson referred 
the Committee to the background information previously circu- 
lated and said he would elaborate if Trustees had questions. He 
said that the ability to zero-balance disbursement accounts had 
made possible the maximizing of the "float" by placing the money 
in savings accounts and investing it in short-term certificates 
of deposit, thereby increasing substantially interest income. 

Ohio Land Sale — The last agenda item, the status of the sale of land 

Deed of Easement in Ohio, was introduced by Treasurer Johnson at the request of 
(Doc. T76-017) ' the Chairman. He said for the benefit of new members of the 

Committee that the land involved had been given to the University 
under the terms of the will of an alumnus, Murray D. Lincoln, 
and currently the University had a Purchase and Sale Agreement 
with Nationwide Development Company for a portion of the land. 
He said that he had now had a request for a Deed of Easement 
(Doc. T76-017) from the City of Columbus to allow them to extend 
the city water line along one boundary of the property. The 
water line, said Treasurer Johnson, would increase the value of 
the property and was, therefore, beneficial to the University. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
authorize the Treasurer of the University, 
Kenneth W. Johnson, to execute on its behalf 
a deed of easement to the City of Columbus, 
Ohio as more particularly described and set 
forth in Trustee Document T76-017 and to accept 
the City's offer of $1,815.00 as compensation 
for said easement as set forth in its letter 
of October 8, 1975, attached to said Trustee 
Document; further, that the Treasurer be 
authorized to take such other action and to 
execute such other documents as may be nec- 
essary to effectuate the granting of this 
easement and to ensure receipt of said com- 
pensation. 



r 



r 



} 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Johnson added that he would report further on 
the status of the sale at a later meeting. There being no further 
business, the meeting was adjourned at 5:20 p.m. 



% 



JL * 



4 Keith Hardv 



lady$ Keith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4 K *2'7 



Finance Comm. 
10-22-75 



• 



■ < 

I 



4728 



PRESENT: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

October 24, 1975; 10:00 a.m. 
Office of the President 
One Washington Mall 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Spiller, President Wood; 
Trustees Clark, Dennis, Eddy, Rothenburger ; Mr. Wolfman, repre- 
senting Trustee Dukakis; Treasurer Johnson; Ms. Eichel, recorder 



Office of the President: Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Plan- 



ABSENT: 



UM/Worc ester — 
Motor 
Vehicle 
Regulations 
(Doc. T76-014 
and T76-014A) 



ning; Mr. Bench, Assistant Counsel; Mr. Lewis, Staff Assistant 
Office of the Budget; Mr. Post, Assistant Vice President for 
Physical Planning; Mr. Stephenson, Staff Associate, Planning 
Office 

UM/ Amherst : Mr. Littlefield, Planning Director 



' 



UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Meehan, Planning Director 



UM/Worcester : Mr. Greig, Director of the Physical Plant 



Trustees Shearer and Winthrop 

The meeting was called to order at 10:10 a.m. by Chairman 
Spiller. 

At the request of Chairman Spiller, Mr. Greig introduced 
the matter of Motor Vehicle Regulations and Traffic Regulation 
Map — UM/Worcester (Doc. T76-014 and -014A) . He said that the 
regulations, which are similar to those previously adopted by the 
Board for UM/Amherst and UM/Boston, had been approved by the UM/ 
Worcester administration. Mr. Greig added that arrangements are 
being made to secure traffic signs but until they are in place, it 
will be difficult to enforce the regulations. 

In response to a query from President Wood, Mr. Greig 
replied that the campus does not anticipate imposing fees for 
surface parking lots until such time as there are an adequate 
number of on-grade paved parking areas. Vice President Robinson 
added that there is need for further discussion on the subject 
of parking fees before the campus can initiate action. On 
motion made and seconded, it was then 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
it approve and adopt the Motor Vehicle 



' 



F 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Rules and Regulations for the University 
of Massachusetts at Worcester and the 
Traffic Regulation Map as set forth in 
Trustee Documents T76-014 and T76-014A, 
respectively. 

Chairman Spiller asked Mr. Littlefield to brief the 
Committee on the next agenda item, the Land Transfer, Town of 
Amherst — UM/ Amherst (Doc. T76-015) . Mr. Littlefield reported 



that in 1938, the University deeded to the Town of Amherst a 
plot of land in Hadley on which the Town subsequently built a 
sewage treatment plant. In 1960, the University asked the Town 
of Amherst for permission to build a research facility on a por- 
tion of that land, which request was granted, but for which the 
Town of Amherst neglected to obtain a building permit from the 
Town of Hadley. 

In 1975 when the Town of Amherst applied for a zoning 
variance for a new treatment plant, the Hadley Zoning Board of 
Appeals denied the request, partly because of the technical 
violation concerning the lack of a building permit for the 
research facility. The Town of Amherst later obtained the build- 
ing permit for the new sewage treatment plant, but not for the 
research facility. Since the University as a state institution 
is not subject to zoning regulations, the Town now proposes to 
transfer the land on which the research facility stands to the 
University. Mr. Littlefield called attention to an error of fact 
in the Trustee document, which did not indicate that the research 
facility was extant. The correction was noted and on motion made 
and seconded, it was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

it accept, for zero or nominal consideration, 
the fee in and to a certain parcel of land 
from the Inhabitants of the Town of Amherst, 
said land being a triangular parcel bounded 
and described as follows: 

Beginning at a point on the southerly side 
of a discontinued county layout named North 
Hadley Road, said point being the northwest 
corner of land owned by the Inhabitants of 
the Town of Amherst. Thence running along 
said North Hadley Road S. 61°-55'-48"E. , a 
distance of 70.86' to a point; thence run- 
ning through land belonging to the Inhabi- 
tants of the Town of Amherst S. 28°-00'-45" 



W. 



a distance of 219.80' to a point; thence 



4729 



B & G Comm. 
10-24-75 



UM/Amherst — 
Land Transfer , 
Town of Amherst 
to University 
(Doc. T76-015) 



4730 



B & G Comm. 
10-24-75 



UM/Amherst — 

Naming of 

Theater 

in Fine Arts 

Center for 

Frank Prentice 

Rand 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



running along land of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts (University of Massachusetts) 
N. 10°-09'-00" E., a distance of 231.01' to 
the point of beginning. Said parcel con- 
taining 7,787 swuare feet, and being part 
of those premises conveyed by the Trustees 
of the Massachusetts State College to the 
Inhabitants of the Town of Amherst by deed 
dated January 18, 1939 recorded with Hamp- 
shire County Registry of Deeds in Book 940 
Page 517. 



Further, that the Treasurer of the University, 
Kenneth W. Johnson, in consultation with the 
General Counsel to the University, be authoriz- 
ed to execute any documents which may be 
required to effectuate this vote. 



Chairman Spiller next turned to the naming of the Fine 
Arts Theater — UM/Amherst. He said that in March 1973 Chancellor 
Bromery had forwarded a petition from the Rand Name Committee, 
together with letters from other individuals, suggesting that 
the Fine Arts Center or a theater therein be named for the late 
Frank Prentice Rand, a former professor at UM/Amherst, author, 
poet and dramatist. He was an outstanding teacher, the Univer- 
sity's first historian and head of the English Department. Among 
his publications, said Chairman Spiller is a history of the Town 
of Amherst. His nomination has the endorsement of Trustee Troy, 
Chancellor Bromery, Dean Jeremiah Allen and members of the Theater 
Department, the University of Massachusetts Foundation, as well 
as others. 



Discussion ensued concerning policies and practices for 
the naming of buildings in general and Chancellor Golino stated 
that at UM/Boston the naming of buildings is a matter of major 
concern. Although the subject of building names will be a matter 
for further discussion by the Committee, it was the consensus 
that the theater could be named at this time, and on motion made 
and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Main Theater in the Fine Arts Center at 
the Amherst Campus be named "The Frank Pren- 
tice Rand Theater." 

At the request of Chairman Spiller, Mr. Littlefield 
introduced discussion of the proposed Bus System — UM/Amherst. 
He said the campus is seeking a capital grant to gain ownership 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

of buses now being used under a Federal demonstration grant. 
There was a further proposal to expand the fleet in order to add 
another bus route and to make the service more reliable. He said 
the buses currently in use are deteriorating and that additional 
buses are required during peak periods. 

The bus service, he said, is a part of a Balanced Trans- 
portation and Parking System. There are now 18 buses and by 
increasing the number to 25 it would be possible to improve the 
current service and to add a third commuter route to serve the 
East Hadley area. The two present routes serve the outlying 
districts of Sunderland (a distance of 5 miles) and South Deer- 
field and Belchertown during off-peak periods. The funds for the 
operation of the bus system are obtained from parking fees. Mr. 
Littlefield explained that the proposed bus system would be the 
bus system for the Town of Amherst and would be fare free in order 
to encourage commuters to use the bus rather than to drive to 
the campus. He said that 75 percent of the bus travel is within 
the Town of Amherst. Questions were raised with regard to f inane-- 
ing, competition with other carriers and non-University riders. 

Trustee Eddy said that the Town of Amherst had been 
very supportive of the original experiment. She said that the 
University bus system would operate under the jurisdiction of the 
Pioneer Valley Transit Authority and that the Town of Amherst 
would negotiate with the University if it desired bus routes in 
addition to those provided by the University for its own benefit. 
In response to a query from Trustee Clark, Mr. Littlefield said 
that safeguards would be provided in any contract so that the 
University would not be liable for providing service if funds were 
not available. Mr. Littlefield said there was no action expected 
on the bus system at this time except for approval of the build- 
ing of a new repair and storage facility for the system. Ques- 
tioned as to whether an existing building could fulfill this need. 
Mr. Littlefield replied that since grease pits and other such 
service facilities could not be provided, the new structure was 
necessary. On motion made and seconded, it was then 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the drawings and specifications for a bus 
storage and maintenance facility at UMass/ 
Amherst be approved and the construction of 
such a facility be authorized, subject to 
receipt of a capital grant from the U.S. 
Department of Transportation. 

Chairman Spiller asked for a report on the Phase I 
Mechanical Systems — UM/Boston. Mr. Meehan reported on numerous 
difficulties with the air-conditioning system located in the 
Service Building. There has been a corrosive problem in the 



4731 



B & G Comm. 
10-24-75 



UM/ Bos ton- 
Phase I 
Mechanical 
Systems 



4732 



B & G Comm. 
10-24-75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

pumping system almost from the time the campus opened. In 
addition, he said, the compressors have malfunctioned to the 
point where two of the four had to be retooled by the manufacturers 
(at their own expense). Thus far, there have been some $400,000 
in additional expenses over and above the original contract of 
$6 million. The campus is now faced with the necessity of in- 
curring major maintenance expenses so that the system can con- 
tinue to function. Moreover, a large capital expenditure is 
required to correct the defects on a long-range basis. Trustee 
Dennis asked who ultimately would have to pay for the defects 
in the system and Mr. Meehan replied that it was the responsi- 
bility of the Bureau of Building Construction to obtain satis- 
factory performance of the contracts, but that in the meantime 
University money had been used. He said that in addition to the 
problems in the pumping system, there are also problems with the 
ventilation systems in College I. 

Mr. Greig indicated that UM/Worcester had also experi- 
enced incidents of lack of performance on the part of contractors 
and lack of support from the BBC. 

Chairman Spiller asked Mr. Greig to prepare a list of 
uncompleted work at UM/Worcester for which payment has been 
made by the BBC for submission to the Committee for considera- 
tion at its next meeting. At the same time, the Committee urged 
that a list of the deficiencies at UM/Boston be formally brought 
to the attention of the BBC by General Counsel. On motion made 
and seconded, it was then 



VOTED : To request the President to explore with the 
General Counsel the legal steps to be taken 
to initiate a satisfactory resolution of the 
deficiencies in the mechanical systems at the 
Harbor Campus , and to insure that the Bureau 
of Building Construction has been properly and 
formally notified of the University's objec- 
tions to and lack of acceptance of the same, 
and to report to the Committee on Buildings 
and Grounds at its next meeting. 

Chairman Spiller next asked President Wood to intor- 
duce the matter of Permanent Financing of the Campus Center and 
Fraternity/Sorority Park — UM/Amherst. President Wood said that 
this is a very complex matter which has generated a great deal 
of concern over the years. A staff paper had been prepared for 
the Committee providing background information and a more 
detailed study of options available to the University is now 
being made. In preparation for discussion at a later date, 
Chairman Spiller suggested that the Committee read the paper 
and offer suggestions for possible solutions. 



1 



4733 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Spiller asked next for status reports on a 
variety of matters. 

Chancellor Golino reported first on the progress of 
plans for the conversion of the Calf Pasture Pump House adjacent 
to the Harbor Campus to a campus/community facility. He said the 
Advisory Committee had submitted its report and that it was now 
appropriate to pursue options for financing the project. 

Chairman Spiller reviewed briefly proposed plans for 
the building for the benefit of the new Committee members and 
explained that an extensive presentation had been made at the 
last Committee meeting by the architects who had planned the 
renovation of the building. 

Trustee Rothenburger emphasized the importance that the 
students place on having space where they can meet. He urged 
that the Student Activities Committee and the students in general 
be involved in the planning stages. It was the sense of the 
meeting that Chancellor Golino should thank the Advisory Com- 
mittee for its work and indicate that the Buildings and Grounds 
Committee supports the plans for the building and has asked him 
to look into various financing options. 

Next to be considered was the use of the University 
facilities at 100 Arlington Street by the Boston School Depart- 
ment. Chancellor Golino reported that there were fewer students 
than anticipated, and that everything appeared to be going 
smoothly. 

Mr. Meehan then reported on the progress of the gym- 
nasium at UM/Boston. He said he expected that the contract for 
the foundations would go out to bid shortly. Working drawings 
for the building, he said, were progressing and he anticipated 
that the main construction contract would go out to bid in 
February. 

Mr. Greig reported that site work at UM/Worcester would 
be let momentarily. Parking areas which include the emergency 
area and the outpatient parking zone of the hospital should be 
finished by December 15. Landscaping for the hospital will not 
be completed until spring. Contracts have not yet been let for 
the remainder of the landscaping 

Mr. Littlefield reported that although the formal open- 
ing of the Fine Arts Center was held on October 10, the concert 
and recital halls would not be fully operative until the sound 
and lighting contracts had been settled. 

Mrs. Robinson explained briefly that the Worcester Heri- 
tage Society had asked and received permission to include the 



B & G Comm, 
10-24-75 



UM/Boston — 
Calf Pasture 
Pumping 
Station 



UM/ Boston- 
Use of 100 
Arlington 
Street by 
Boston School 
Department 

UM/Boston — 
Building 120 
(Gymnasium) 



UM/Worcester- 
Site Work 



UM/ Amherst- 
Fine Arts 
Center 



UM/Worcester- 
Heritage 
Society 
Plaque 



4734 



B & G Comm. 
10-24-75 



UM/Boston — 
Kennedy 
Library Site 
Selection 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

UM/Worcester Medical Science Building on a walking tour in con- 
nection with Bicentennial activities. A Plaque would be affixed 
to the building by the Society. 

Mrs. Robinson then brought the Committee up to date on 
the status of the Kennedy Library site selection. She said Uni- 
versity personnel were working closely with the Library Committee 
and that a decision will probably be made by the Board of Directors 
of the Kennedy Corporation on November 24. The Harbor Campus, 
she said, is now one of the two sites still being considered. 
The other alternative site would put the archives in Cambridge 
and the museum in Charles town. Trustee Clark remarked on the 
lack of support given by the City of Boston for the Harbor Campus 
site. Mrs. Robinson stated that there is much enthusiasm in the 
Dorchester community over the prospect of having the Library 
complex located at UM/Boston. Trustee Clark said that the 
Columbia Point community was now supportive of the overall con- 
cept of the redevelopment of the area, where they were once 
apprehensive. Mrs. Robinson said that the Harbor Campus would 
provide a dramatic site for the Library and that the University 
would continue in its efforts to bring the complex to the cam- 
pus. 

The last agenda item was the matter of Committee pro- 
cedures and schedule. It was the sense of those present that 
some meetings should be held on the various campuses to enable 
new Trustees to become familiar with the physical plants. It 
was agreed that Secretary Hardy, in consultation with Chairman 
Spiller and Vice President Robinson, would develop a schedule 
for future meetings of the Committee, that the Committee would 
continue to meet on a bi-monthly basis with additional meetings 
called as required. There being no further business, the meet- 
ing was adjourned at 12:15 p.m. 



r 



f 



^Gladys* Keith Hardy 



Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



} 



PRESENT 



ABSENT: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON THE BUDGET 



October 28, 1975; 10:30 a.m. 
Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 
Boston, Massachusetts 



Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Carlson; President Wood; 
Trustees Croce, Dennis, Rothenburger and Troy; Mr. Callahan 
representing Trustee Anrig; Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; 
Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice President for 
Academic Affairs; Mr. Gartenberg, Budget Director; Mrs. Hanson, 
Associate Budget Director; Mr. Kaplan, Assistant Vice President 
for Organization and Management; Mr. Lewis, Staff Associate, 
Budget Office 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Bulko, Budget Director; 
Mr. DeShields, Assistant to the Chancellor 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Baxter, Director of Budget 
and Control; Professor Marshall, Faculty Representative 

UM/Worcester : Acting Dean Butcher; Mr. Cathey, Controller; 
Mr. Keane , Budget Director 



Guest : Mr. Burton Wolf man, Undersecretary of Educational 
Affairs 

Trustees Breyer and Gordon 



The meeting was convened at 10:30 a.m. President Wood 
began at Chairman Carlson's request by informating the Committee 
that the University was being asked to begin its presentation of 
its FY 1077 budget request when there was not yet an FY 1976 
budget. He said that the House and Senate were in the process 
of resolving the difference between their two versions of the 
FY 1976 budget. He said he hoped for progress within the week, 
especially to restore the UM/Boston appropriation from the 
Senate level to the House level. The President then asked Mr. 
Gartenberg to comment. 

Mr. Gartenberg described the differences between the 
Executive Budget recommendation and the proposed Budgets of the 
House and Senate. The House and Senate versions differed sig- 
nificantly, he said, most seriously in the recommendation for 
the UM/Boston appropriation: $17.5 million in the House version. 



4735 



FY 1977 
Budget 



4736 



Budget Comm. 
10-28-75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

$16.9 million in the Senate version. He said that the House 
and Senate versions also differed in the language governing use 
of appropriate funds. He also pointed out that a position freeze 
was still in effect, and that approximately 12 percent of the 
positions in the University were frozen. 

Chairman Carlson asked whether there would be diffi- 
culty in meeting the University payroll in November. Mr. Garten- 
berg replied that this would depend on when the full budget was 
enacted. 

Chancellor Bromery summarized the problems of the 
Amherst campus. The first was the problem of fuel purchases: 
the campus must have the funds to encumber before it can order 
fuel. The second serious problem, said Chancellor Bromery, was 
the effort to hold down the nonpersonnel expenses in order to 
meet the payroll. He described the one-twelfth method of pur- 
chasing supplies as the most inefficient and costly possible and 
said that if the campus received the $66.4 million proposed by 
both the House and Senate appropriations proposals, it will be 
necessary to begin to consider laying off people. He described 
the futility of attempting a FY 1977 Budget exercise without 
having the FY 1976 Budget. 

Chancellor Golino said that the UM/Boston situation 
was critical and discouraging because of the uncertainty. He 
said that the campus is asking to plan without knowing what 
resources it will have to base its plans on. He said that the 
vacant positions were the biggest problem, and observed that 
the campus is very understaffed. The House level of $17.5 
million would permit the campus to continue operating, said the 
Chancellor, but the $16.9 million figure would pose major 
problems. It would require layoffs and substantial program 
cutbacks . 

Chairman Carlson asked about the plans for the spring 
semester, and Chancellor Golino replied that admissions would 
be cut back, otherwise the quality of the education would be 
seriously, perhaps irreparably, damaged. The campus was pre- 
sently planning for the fall 1976 semester, he said, and he 
believed that it should maintain the 6,600 enrollment level. 
He also stressed the importance of the University having flex- 
ibility in the use of whatever appropriation it does finally 
get. He also told the Committee that high-quality professional 
persons are leaving. The point was made that, even in a 
difficult job market, the best people are able to go elsewhere. 

Chairman Carlson next asked Acting Dean Butcher for 
his remarks. Dr. Butcher said that the opening of the hospital 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

was the biggest issue. Chairman Carlson asked about the proposed 
opening date of the hospital, and Dr. Butcher said that the 
target date was still December 1, but he said that it would be 
difficult to open the hospital without authorization to hire 
the people needed to staff it. Mr. Gartenberg indicated that 
the Worcester campus has received authorization from the Presi- 
dent's Office to use nonstate funds to hire personnel office 
staff necessary to carry out the recruitment effort. 

Trustee Rothenburger stated that the uncertainty also 
affected students, in that they were unable to plan their own 
schedules and programs without knowing what programs would be 
available. Professor Marshall seconded Chancellor Golino's 
statement that when the quality goes, it is impossible or diffi- 
cult to replace. As an example, she cited the loss of several 
kep people in the Spanish Department of the Boston campus who 
cannot now be replaced. She observed that Spanish is an import- 
ant language in this area. 

Mr. Gartenberg said the Budget Office hoped to present 
the Trustees with a detailed operating budget proposal for FY 
1976 by February. He said that the President's guidelines had 
suggested two principal options: (1) to continue the across- 
the-board cuts and freezes, or (2) to make program adjustments. 
The Chancellors had been asked to do the latter in FY 1976, but 
it was recognized that the short-term effects would be marginal. 

Chairman Carlson asked whether the Budget and Faculty 
and Educational Policy Committees would see the proposed program 
changes and whether these Committees would have an opportunity 
to have an impact on them before they were fed into the FY 1977 
Budget. Chancellor Bromery said that major program shifts would 
take four or five years to put into effect, and Chairman Carlson 
emphasized that he wanted to know what the shifts were. Mr. 
Lynton explained that the provosts of all campuses had been askec 
to tackle the broad outlines of program adjustments by January 1 
so that the Committees and the Board could discuss them in January 
and February. He said that this effort must begin at the campus 
level in the next two months. 

Chancellor Bromery indicated that the Budget Committee 
was aware that his campus was actively engaged in making program- 
matic reviews. The long-range shifts, he said, would involve 
sensitive personnel decisions, including decisions about tenured 
faculty. This, he said, could not be done immediately. Mr. 
Gulko said that the campus had been at work for more than a year 
developing criteria and procedures, and it was just now becoming 
possible to make some decisions on the basis of these criteria. 
When decisions are made, he said, it will be two or three years 
before any benefits will be recognizable. Chairman Carlson said 



4737 



Budget Comm. 
10-28-75 



4738 



Budget Comm. 
10-28-75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

he was aware of these facts but said the University must begin 
the process. 

Chancellor Golino said the position of the Boston cam- 
pus was different from that of the Amherst campus in that he 
could not make shifts or programs which were not yet in place. 
He said he hoped that campus could continue its thrust and not 
be stopped dead. Chairman Carlson replied that this would imply 
that the campus must come to grips with the question of the future 
of Colleges I and II. Chancellor Golino added that it must also 
address the question of how this would affect Colleges III and 
IV. 



Trustee Troy remarked that it would be possible to 
reduce enrollment without eliminating programs, but the point was 
made that to do so would have some effect on the programs. 
Trustee Rothenburger said the proposal for a raise in tuition 
was perceived by many students as racist and threatening to minor 
ity students. Mr. Gartenberg replied that the impact of a tui- 
tion raise on minority students would be offset by existing 
patterns of federal aid. Mr. Lynton said that the Trustees woulc 
be presented with detailed models on the impact a raise would 
have on several types of students . 

Trustee Rothenburger said that the dissemination of this 
kind of information — about available aid to mitigate a tuition 
raise — was not adequate on the campus. He added that even doubl- 
ing tuition would have a marginal effect on the state's budget 
deficit. Chairman Carlson agreed about the latter point, but 
said that he viewed the proposal for a tuition raise as a realis- 
tic acknowledgement of the common view that public higher educa- 
tion is a bargain, and that in the present fiscal condition of 
the state those who benefit from this education ought to make a 
larger contribution. 

Chancellor Golino described the proposal for a tuition 
increase as a simplistic solution to a complex problem, and he 
said he feared that those who would be hurt must by it were not 
the very poor nor the middle class, but those in between. Chair- 
man Carlson said that all members of the Committee shared that 
concern. 



Mr. Gartenberg turned to the FY 1977 Budget, saying 
that an early November submission date had been asked by the 
executive branch, although there were no forms yet available 
with which to make the submission. Hearings were to be divided 
into two categories, the first set schedule to begin November 6 
on specific issues which affect all areas of higher education. 
He expressed uncertainty about the purpose of these hearings. 
Mr. Wolf man explained that the hearings were designed to be an 
informal platform for faculty, students, and citizens' advocacy 



F 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



groups to express their concerns about program areas to the 
executive. Mr. Gartenberg asked how this related to institution- 
al planning, and Mr. Wolfman replied that these citizen concerns 
could be fed back into the formal budget process. Mr. Lynton 
asked whether there would be input from the institutions involved, 
and Mr. Wolfman answered that there would be an opportunity for 
formal budget hearings with the institutions later, and that these 
hearings were primarily a forum for citizen participation. 

Mr. Wolfman was asked what he meant when he said that 
faculty members would testify at these hearings. He said that 
individual faculty members were authorized to speak for the 
University. Mr. Wolfman said that this was not the assumption, 
but Chairman Carlson said that this was how it would appear and 
that this seriously concerned him. To turn these sessions into 
actual budget hearings, he said, would be totally inappropriate. 

Mr. Lynton asked what the purpose of these hearings was 
and Mr. Wolfman said they were just like any legislative hearing 
or governmental hearing which provides an opportunity for citizens 
to state their concerns. He said Secretary Parks would preside, 
and that individuals who had previously contacted the Executive 
Office of Educational Affairs would be notified on the hearings 
but that no new individuals would be invited. He added that 
press releases would be issued. 

Chairman Carlson said this kind of unstructured "town 
meeting" process could have the effect of pitting the institu- 
tions against the testimony of special interest groups. He asked 
how the University could make decisions about program priorities 
with such a process. Mr. Gartenberg then stated that the schedule 
for the formal budget hearings was so structured that each campus 
would make a presentation in its region of the state. Amherst 
would present its budget along with other institutions in the 
Western Massachusetts area, and the Worcester and Boston campuses 
would do likewise. There was a serious question, he said, as to 
whether segments of higher education would be able to make their 
presentations as unified institutions. 

Mr. Gartenberg asked Mr. Wolfman why the segments were 
being split for the purposes of the hearing, and Mr. Wolfman 
answered that the locations were not related to the presentation 
of the executive budget, but were simply for the convenience of 
those testifying. He pointed out that the open budget law re- 
quired a hearing for each appropriation account. He said that 
some of the segments had asked to present an overview of their 
total budget needs at each hearing. However, the specific re- 
quests of each campus would be heard only once. Mr. Gartenberg 
indicated that such a presentation process would make it difficult: 
to maintain the integrity of the segmental requests and would 
create confusion. 



4739 






Budget Comm, 
10-28-75 



4740 



Budget Comm. 
10-28-75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Gartenberg next informed the Committee that the 
University would have to make a presentation at the formal budget 
hearings scheduled for November 17, even though the Board had not 
yet voted a budget request for FY 1977 and even though a FY 
1976 budget had not been approved. For this reason, he said, the 
Committee would need to authorize the President to prepare a 
preliminary FY 1977 Budget request. The figure of $109 million 
in the vote was a ceiling, he said, and was much higher than the 
amount the University would actually request for FY 1977. It was 
designed to restore some of the cuts in the nonpersonnel accounts 
provide limited personnel flexibility and allow essential develop 
ment of the Medical School. The actual figure, he said, would 
probably be less than $109 million and the full outline of both 
requests would be provided to the Committee at its November meet- 
ing. A motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To authorize the President to prepare the 

preliminary outlines of a FY 77 Maintenance 
Budget Request the total of which shall not 
exceed $109 million excluding the University 
Hospital. Further, to authorize the Presi- 
dent to prepare a preliminary FY 77 University 
Hospital Maintenance Budget Request, including 
up to date estimates of cost and revenue for 
FY 77. The full and detailed FY 77 Request 
shall be presented to the Board of Trustees 
for approval at the regular scheduled meeting 
in December, 1975. 

There was no further business to come before the Com- 
mittee, and the meeting was adjourned at 11:45 a.m. 



ftladyfl Keith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



I 



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4741 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



NOT USED 



4742 



PRESENT: 



ABSENT: 



UM/Wo re ester — 

Statement of 

Goals 

(Doc. T76-010) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

November 5, 1975; 11:00 a.m. 
Faculty Dining Room 
College I 
University of Massachusetts/Boston 

Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Healey; President Wood; 
Trustees Carlson, Croce, Dennis, Gordon, Morgenthau, Rothenburger 
Rowland, Spiller, Troy; Mrs. Bluestone representing Trustee 
Fielding; Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice President for 
Academic Affairs; Mr. Gartenberg, Budget Director; Mr. Kaplan, 
Assistant Vice President for Organization and Management; Mr. 
Searson, General Counsel; Father Walsh, Academic Advisor to the 
President; Mr. White, Assistant to the President 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Professor Wilkinson, Faculty 
Representative 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Hamilton, Vice Chancellor for 
Administration and Finance; Professor Marshall, Faculty Repre- 
sentative 

UM/Worcester : Acting Dean Butcher; Dr. Hittelman, Faculty 
Representative 

Guests : Ms. Ellen Gavin, UM/Amherst Student Trustee-Designate; 
Mr. Milton Kirstein, UM/Boston Student 

Trustee Shaler 



The meeting was called to order by the Chairman at 
11:05 a.m. The President took up the Statement of Goals of the 
Medical School (Doc. T76-010) , reminding the Committee that the 
Board had recommended the discussion of the goals by all Trust- 
ees before a formal vote was taken. He made two points: (1) 
that the statement had been generated by the faculty and admini- 
stration of the school, and that (2) the statement committed the 
School to quality medical education and responsiveness to the 
needs and goals of the Commonwealth. Acting Dean Butcher said 
the document had been prepared by the senior faculty of the 
school, had been circulated to the general faculty for comment, 
and accordingly now contained the comment and revision suggested 
by that process. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chancellor Bromery asked if the Medical School actually 
did not view research as one of its goals. He observed that it 
was not in the summary statement of goals. Dr. Butcher replied 
that research was a goal, and that its place was reflected in 
the body of the statement. Several Trustees observed that the 
statement was to be approved, not the summary, and that adjust- 
ments in the summary could be made administratively. Upon motion 
made and seconded, it was 



VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees endorse 
the Statement of Goals for the University of 
Massachusetts Medical Center as prepared by 
the Faculty and Administration of the Medical 
School, dated September, 1975, Trustee Doc. 
T76-010. 

The President directed the Committee's attention to 
two proposed Classifications of Position Titles (Docs. T76-018, 
T76-020). After a short discussion of the reasons for the change 
in the salary range of certain types of athletic coaches, the 
discussion turned to a proposed classification of a Senior Vice 
President for Management and Business Affairs. The President 
said the position was in response to the direction of the oard 
at its meeting of June 4, 1975. He had since then informed the 
Board of the search process and of the character of the position 
in general. He had also spoken with the faculty representatives 
about the position. The Organization Design Review Committee 
had then met to consider the outline of the position. He called 
on Father Walsh for further description of the process. 

Father Walsh told the Committee that the need for the 
position had been strongly indicated by the conclusions of the 
Hay Report, and the position responsibilities had been reviewed 
and approved by the Organization Design Review Committee. He 
said the Vice President for Management and Business Affairs 
would have responsibility for policy formation and program 
review in matters of personnel, accounting, auditing, and pro- 
curement on a University-wide basis. Coopers & Lybrand had said 
this position was needed, and the Hay Associates' study had fur- 
ther reinforced the need for it. 

Trustee Spiller explained that the job description had 
been compiled by the ODRC in response to the Board's instructions 
In his view the description contained demanding responsibilities 
and required a person of great expertise. He concluded that it 
was a tough job that he believed needed to be done. 

Trustee Dennis asked if the Hay Report had been adopted 
and was informed that the vote of the Board on June 4, 1975 had 
authorized the President to make certain adjustments in organiza- 
tional arrangements in order to implement the Hay study on an 
interim basis. Professor Marshall told the Committee that she 



4*; 43 



Exec. Comm, 
11-5-75 



4744 



Exec. Comm, 
11-5-75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

was obligated to report that the UM/Boston facility took a differ- 
ent view of the Hay study. The faculty was apprehensive because 
it felt there had not been an adequate job description for the 
position of Vice President for Management and Business Affairs. 
She said further that she had been instructed by the Steering 
Committee of the UM/Boston Assembly to ask that when the name of 
the candidate for this position was brought before the Board, 
another vote be taken to provide that no further implementation 
of the Hay Report take place until there had been formal referral 
of that document to the campus governance bodies for a stated 
time for study and consultation. 

Trustee Morgenthau reported that she had asked that 
the Hay Report be placed on the agenda of the next meeting of 
the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy. She said she 
was concerned about Father Walsh's statement that the new posi- 
tion carried further the Hay and Coopers & Lybrand studies. She 
had thought, she said, that the Hay Report was still in a stage 
of discussion, and did not wish implementation to continue before 
she had had an opportunity to educate herself sufficiently 
about it. 

Trustee Gordon said that he viewed the problem some- 
what differently. After many weeks of study of the problems of 
the School of Education by the Finance Committee, it had become 
a matter of serious concern that (1) the Amherst campus capabi- 
lity for fiscal management and control, and (2) the President's 
Office capability for oversight over the University must both 
be strengthened. Without reference to the reports of Hay 
Associates and Coopers & Lybrand, the capability had been on the 
campus and in the President's Office years ago. Fiscal autonomy 
meant fiscal responsibility, he added. 

Trustee Morgenthau conceded Trustee Gordon's point, 
but said she perceived that many things seemed to be merging 
without sufficient discussion. The faculty needs to feel that 
it has control over at least part of the management process, 
and she was concerned that the School of Education controversy 
not become the issue on which several layers of management are 
"piggybacked." This is a period of fiscal shrinkage, she said, 
and there were several different strategies which could be 
adopted in such a period. One was centralization, but there 
might be other strategies as well, and she stressed that what 
everybody was concerned about was that quality education go 
forward. She had no desire to block the appointment of a 
qualified individual to this position, but objected to the refer- 
ence to the Hay Report . 



' 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Healey remarked that there could be no doubt 
about the need for this position. He described the new Vice 
President as having functional supervision over the fiscal 
activities of the campus, while the line relationship continues 
to pass from the campus operating officer through the Chancellor 
to the President. The Vice President would advise the President 
on policy matters of management and business affairs. The Chair- 
man said the objective was to give the President adequate means 
to monitor budget expenditures of $100 million annually. He 
said there is not now an adequate capability to carry out the 
responsibility of the Board for the $100 million. He said the 
present description of the position was the "bones" which would 
be fleshed out later. The language of the vote could be changed 
to allow for flexibility in subsequent clarification of the 
responsibilities of the position. But the working out of all 
the issues of governance and the relationships between the cam- 
puses and the President's office should be viewed as a separate 
effort, and could not be accomplished by amendments to or delays 
of this vote. 

Father Walsh pointed out that the position of Vice 
President for Management and Business Affairs had not been ex- 
plicitly recommended by the Hay Report, but by the Executive 
Committee as a result of the findings of Hay Associates and 
Coopers & Lybrand. The reason for it had been the increasingly 
apparent unworkability of the lead agency system, whereby an 
individual on one campus would have the responsibility for 
management of certain University-wide functions.. The lead 
agents, he said, could not sufficiently oversee University-wide 
responsibilities while keeping control over their campus responsi 
bilities. He stressed that the Hay Report had never mentioned 
a Vice President for Management and Business Affairs. 

Trustee Dennis asked about the nature of the action 
the Board had taken with respect to the Hay Report, and Mr. 
Kaplan explained that on June 4, 1975, the Board had taken a 
vote authorizing certain actions: (1) the creation of the 
Organization Design Review Committee, to consider issues of 
the organization of the University; (2) the adoption of salary 
policy lines recommended by the Hay study; (3) the creation of 
the Job Content Measurement Committee to measure job content 
of professional nonacademic positions at the University; (4) 
the establishment of the position of Vice President for Manage- 
ment in the Office of the President and the restructuring of 
related reporting arrangements; and (5) the strengthening of the 
University's internal audit mechanism. 

Trustee Carlson said he thought it regrettable that 
the Hay Report had been construed as an attempt to take away 
the autonomy of the campuses. He pointed out that the Trustees 



4745 



Exec. Comm. 
11-5-75 



.I 



4746 



Exec. Comm. 
11-5-75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

of the University had mandated six years before that the Univer- 
sity would be a multicampus system, and not several autonomous 
campuses. Therefore, he said, Hay Associates had had no choice 
but to begin their study at the Trustee-established position. 
To call the Hay Report an attempt to reduce the autonomy of the 
campuses, he said, was incorrect and revealed a careless reading 
of the report. He said, further, that the Hay Report and its 
implications were not the real issue in this controversy — the 
real issue was whether the University was to be changed from an 
educational system to autonomous branch campuses. 

Both Professors Marshall and Wilkinson agreed that 
neither faculty disputes the need for this position and its 
functions. Professor Marshall said that the UM/Boston faculty 
was frightened that great changes would take place without 
their having an opportunity to contribute to the discussion. 
Professor Wilkinson agreed strongly with Trustee Carlson's 
analysis of the issue, saying that the question of centraliza- 
tion vs. autonomy was perhaps the most fundamental in a public 
University. What the faculty at UM/Amherst wanted, he said, 
was a full discussion of the academic implications of centraliza- 
tion. 

President Wood made two observations: (1) that the 
focus of the discussion should be on the University Governance 
Statement (T73-098) , and (2) that while the Trustees had under- 
stood what the President's Office was to be when it was created 
in 1969, the faculties had not. What he had thought were small 
steps, said the President, referring to the actions taken on June 
4, the faculties had evidently thought were revolutionary. A 
reconciliation between these divergent views was needed, but the 
issue had to be governance, and not the fiscal capability of the 
President's Office. 



Chairman Healey said when the Marcus document was being 
composed, the Board had had two choices: (1) to set up an expert 
Trustee staff to oversee the functioning of the campuses, or (2) 
to establish a central office. It had chosen the latter, and had 
attempted in the process to carefully establish responsibilities 
of the central office and the campuses. He agreed with Trustee 
Morgenthau that the University was now in a period of budget 
stringency, rather than largesse, and said that perhaps it was time 
to take another look at the whole philosophy of the management of 
the University. He agreed that it was time to restudy the Govern- 
ance Statement. He stressed that there were different answers to 
these complicated problems depending on one's position in the 
University, but said that resolution of these problems would 
depend on the ultimate position that the Trustees take on the 
organization of the University. This process would certainly 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

entail input from students and faculty, he said, but it was im- 
portant not to become bogged down and delay this position until 
all the fundamental, philosophical issues were solved. The needs 
were too critical. 

Trustee Troy asked that the Organization Design Review 
Committee give progress reports to the Committee on the scope and 
range of its goals. He added that this report should be given 
fairly soon. 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
and adopt the amendment to Classification of 
Position Titles as contained in Document T76-018. 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
and adopt the amendment to Classification of 
Position Titles as contained in Document T76-020, 
provided that the responsibilities of said posi- 
tion shall be subject to further clarification 
as approved by said Board. 

VOTED : The Classification of Position Titles under the 
Provisions of Chapter 648 of the Acts of 1962 
shall be fixed in a weekly salary range from a 
minimum to a maximum or fixed at a specific 
weekly salary rate which shall not be changed 
except by vote of the Board of Trustees and 
such classification shall not be designated 
by any job group number or grade. 

VOTED : In accordance with the provisions of Chapter 648 
of the Acts of 1962, the position titles in the 
Professional Staff (Docs. T76-020, T76-018) are 
classified at a weekly salary rate specified 
after the title of position subject to subse- 
quently being amended, revised, added to or 
repealed by the Board of Trustees under the 
provisions of said Chapter 648. 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was then 

VOTED : To enter executive session to discuss personnel 
actions and honorary degrees. 

A motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED: To end the executive session. 



4747 



Exec. Comm. 
11-5-75 



4748 



Exec. Comm. 
11-5-75 



Personnel 

Actions 

(Docs. T76-016 : 

T76-025, T76- 

021) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

After the executive session, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur 
with the appointment by the Chancellor of the 
Amherst campuse of Professor Seymour Shapiro as 
Dean of the Faculty of Natural Sciences and 
Mathematics, as detailed in Docs. T76-016 and 
T76-025. 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees concur 
with President Wood's appointment of the Senior 
Vice President for Management and Business Affairs 
as contained in Document T76-021. 

VOTED : Every personnel action shall be subject to the 
policies and procedures now in effect as sub- 
sequently amended, revised, added to or repealed 
by the Board of Trustees with respect to pro- 
fessional personnel under provisions of Chapter 
75 of the General Laws as amended by Chapter 648, 
1962. The classification, salary range and de- 
scriptive job specification for each position 
to which a member of the professional staff is 
hereby appointed, promoted, transferred or 
determined shall be as hereafter determined by 
the Board of Trustees or under their authority. 

There was no further business to come before the 
Committee, and the meeting was adjourned at 12:30 p.m. 



fltladyl Keith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 




1 



PRESENT 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY 
AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

November 5, 1975; 12:30 p.m. 
Faculty Dining Room 
College I, Harbor Campus 
University of Massachusetts/Boston 



Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Troy; Trustees Croce, 
Morgenthau and Snowden; Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice President for 
Academic Affairs 

UM/ Amherst : Mr. Alfange, Acting Vice Chancellor for Academic 
Affairs and Provost; Professor Wilkinson, Faculty Representative 

UM/Boston : Professor Marshall, Faculty Representative 

UM/Worcester : Acting Dean Butcher 

The meeting was called to order at 1:20 p.m. Chairman UM/Worcester — 
Troy informed the members of the Committee that the meeting had Academic Appoint- 
been called to hear a report on a proposal to appoint Dr. Roger ment of Dr. Roger 
Bulger as Professor of Medicine and Community and Family Medicine j Bulger 
with Tenure (Doc. T76-023) . He explained that the faculty of the (Doc. T76-023) 
Medical School had requested this appointment in order that Dr. 
Bulger, should he be appointed as Chancellor /Dean, could more 
effectively maintain the perspective of a faculty member along 
with his administrative responsibilities. The President had 
agreed with the appropriateness of this suggestion, and had 
therefore appointed Dr. Bulger to this position subject to the 
concurrence of the Board. 



4749 



Acting Dean Butcher told the ommittee that the senior 
faculty of the School had acted unanimously in this request, and 
he added his own enthusiastic approval. 

There was no other business to come before the Committee 
and the meeting was therefore adjourned at 1:30 p.m. 



<£ladyl Keith Hardy 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4750 



PRESENT: 



ABSENT: 

Ratifica- 
tion of 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

November 5, 1975; 12:30 p.m. 
Faculty Dining Room 
College I, Harbor Campus 
University of Massachusetts/Boston 

Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Gordon; Trustee Abrams , 
Dennis, Eddy, Robertson, Rowland; Mr. Warren Colby, representing 
Trustee Winthrop; Treasurer Johnson; Miss Eichel, recorder 

Trustees O'Keefe and Weldon 

The meeting was called to order at 1:05 p.m. by Chair- 
man Gordon, who explained that since a quorum had not been present 



r 



Actions taken: at the meeting of the Committee on October 22, it was necessary tp 



at October 
22, 1975 
Meeting 



General 
Electric 
Foundation 
Grant to 
Graduate in 
Polymer 
Science 
(Doc. T76- 
024) 



obtain ratification of the votes taken at that time. Background 
material and copies of the votes had been circulated to the 
Committee, he said. There being no opposition to any of the votes, 
on motion made and seconded, it was 



VOTED : To ratify the actions taken by the Committee 
on Finance on October 22, 1975, as set forth 
in the votes distributed and as recorded in 
the minutes of the meeting. 

At the request of Chairman Gordon, Treasurer Johnson 
reported that the University had received a General Electric 
Foundation Grant to Graduate in Polymer Science (Doc. T76-024) 
consisting of a gift of 172 shares of General Electric unre- 
gistered stock and a check from the General Electric Foundation 
to cover a graduate student stipend of $7,500. In order to 
i provide the stipend, he said, it was understood that it would 
] be necessary to sell the stock. The sale of the stock had now 
been negotiated but in order to complete the transfer, the 
brokers would require a vote of the Finance Committee authorizing 
the Treasurer to sign the certificates of sale. There being no 
objection, on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To authorize Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer 
of the University of Massachusetts, to sell 
172 shares of General Electric Company unre- 
gistered stock and to deposit the net pro- 
ceeds from said sale in addition to the check 
for $18.00 in the General Electric Trust 
Fund for a graduate grant for a student in 
Polymer Science as described in Doc. T76- 
024. 



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' 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

There being no further business, the meeting was 
adjourned at 1:10 p.m. 



Gladys Keith Hardy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4751 



Finance Comm, 
11-5-75 



4752 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



I 



NOT USED 



I 



I 



1 



PRESENT: 



I 



ABSENT: 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND 

GROUNDS 

November 18, 1975; 11:00 a.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Spiller, President Wood; 
Trustees Clark and Shearer; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Hardy; 
Miss Eichel, recorder 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice President for 
Academic Affairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; 
Mr. Bench, Assistant Counsel; Mr. Cahill, Staff Assistant for 
Student Affairs, Mr. Kaplan, Assistant Vice President for Organi- 
zation and Management; Mr. Post, Assistant Vice President for 
Physical Planning; Mr. Stephenson, Staff Associate, Planning 
Office. 

UM/ Amherst : Dr. Gage, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs; 
Mr. Littlefield, Planning Director 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Meehan, Planning Director 

UM/Worcester : Dr. Majno, Chairman, Department of Pathology; 

Mr. Greig, Director of the Physical Plant; Mr. Metcalf , Operating 

Engineer, Physical Plant 

Guests: Mr. Myron A. Maiewski, Assistant Commissioner of Agri- 
culture; Mr. Ira Horowitz, Attorney, UM/Amherest Legal Services 
Office; Ms. Debra Frade, Mr. James Brandt, Mr. James Hight and 
Mr. Patrick Walker of the University of Massachusetts Tenants 
Association, UM/Amherst 

Trustees Dennis, Eddy and Winthrop 

The meeting was called to order at 11:15 a.m. by Chair- 
man Spiller. 

At the request of Chairman Spiller, Vice President 
Robinson reviewed briefly the capital outlay priorities set by 
the xecutive Office of Administration and Finance and the Bureau 
of Building Construction for University projects, as outlined on 
the list distributed to the Committee. These priorities, she said, 
for the most part, reflect the priorities set by the University — 
one major exception being the construction of the third college 
building at UM/Boston, which is considered to be a high priority 
item by the University while A & F has listed it as a long-range 
item. The guidelines established by the Board of Trustees for 



4753 



Capital Outlay 



4754 

B&G Comm. 
11/18/75 



UM/ Amherst— 

Permanent 

Financing 

of Campus 

Center and 

Fraternity/ 

Sorority 

Park 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the enrollment goal at UM/Boston, said Mrs. Robinson, anticipated 
that the 12,500 students would be accommodated in four college 
buildings, only two of which have been constructed to date. 

Mrs. Robinson said that the University would be adding 
one item to the list, the replacement of the roof of the Library 
at UM/Boston at a cost of $150,000. She added that depending on 
what decisions are made regarding the animal facilities pro- 
posed for South Deerfield, it might be possible to reduce the 
UM/ Amherst campus safety item under the A & F "essential" list. 
Mrs. Robinson said University personnel would be meeting with 
A & F and BBC personnel to discuss the priority list. 



Chairman Spiller asked President Wood to review for 
the Committee the next agenda item, permanent financing of the 
Campus Center and Fraternity/Sorority Park at UM/Amherst. Presi- 
dent Wood said that this complex and difficult problem had been 
discussed by the Amherst campus administration, the Treasurer and 
within the office of the President and that a solution must be 
found by spring, at which time the University must secure per- 
manent financing of the projects. He said there is legislation 
pending in Ways and Means to raise the ceiling on interest rates 
for Building Authority bonds. This might help the financial 
situation but certain proposed provisions in the legislation would 
cause problems for the University. 

President Wood then asked Mr. Post, Assistant Vice 
President for Physical Planning, to describe the projects and to 
review various possible options. 

Building Authority Project #11 consists of the Campus 
Center, the Student Union and the Garage, although the campus 
administers the garage as a separate project for budgetary pur- 
poses. To date the University payments to the Building Authority 
have covered only the interest on short-term notes and none of the 
capital costs have been retired. The fact that the garage has 
been operating at a deficit compounds the problem of permanent 
financing. 

Mr. Post said that at the time the Campus Center is 
converted to permanent financing, it will be necessary to raise 
an additional $415,000 per year. Of this amount, $185,000 will 
be attributable to the garage and $230,000 to the Campus Center. 
Among the ways this money can be made availab,e he said, are the 
following: 1) increase net revenue at the Campus Center, 2) 
raise student fees, 3) include the garage as part of the Balanced 
Transportation and Parking system, and 4) use funds from the cam- 
pus operating budget to lease portions of the garage and Campus 
Center from the Building Authority. 



I 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Post pointed out that these approaches could be 
used in many combinations and that further review by the Amherst 
campus and Office of the President would be necessary before 
final recommendations were submitted to the Trustees. 

Mr. Post then turned to the matter of the Fraternity/ 
Sorority Park complex. Building Authority Project #14 consists 
of some nine acres of land in the Fraternity/Sorority Park com- 
plex, which was originally purchased to construct housing for 
600 students in small dormitory units. The Building Authority 
has an investment of approximately $530,000 in the Project, but 
cannot secure permanent financing without a potential source of 
revenue. Therefore, unless the University proceeds with a pro- 
ject, he said, it must either buy the land from the Authority 
or ask the Building Authority to sell the land to others. 

Chairman Spiller said he had received a letter from 
Trustee Eddy in her capacity as Chairman of the Board of Select- 
men for the Town of Amherst with regard to this property, indi- 
cating that the Town would be happy to cooperate with the Uni- 
versity in planning for this area, but also pointing out several 
problems having to do with zoning, traffic, transportation and 
sewage. Mr. Spiller distributed copies of the letter to members 
of the Committee. 

Chairman Spiller asked what the next step should be in 
the resolution of this matter, to which Mrs. Robinson replied 
that after conversation with the Building Authority, a joint 
recommendation by the campus and the President's Office would 
be made to the Board of Trustees. 

Treasurer Johnson emphasized that the financing problem 
for these projects is critical and immediate. The Building 
Authority has legislative authority to continue temporary financ 
ing only through mid- June of this year. It has been unable to 
obtain permanent financing on the Campus Center due to the 
interest ceiling which was imposed by the statute. He said that 
legislation is pending to remove this ceiling, but this legisla- 
tion also provides that all Building uthority projects would have 
to be approved by the Executive Office of Administration and 
Finance as well as by the Secretary of Educational Affairs and 
that financing arrangements and the interest rate on any bonds 
before they were sold would have to be approved by the Secretary 
of Administration and Finance and the State Treasurer. Treasurer 
Johnson said the only other solution would be to obtain an 
extension on the temporary financing. 

President Wood said that he felt that it would be 
necessary for representatives of UM/Amherst and the President's 
Office to try to resolve these issues. 



4755 



B&G Comm. 
11/18/75 



4756 



B&G Comm. 
11/18/75 

UM/Amherst — 
Proposed Agree- 
ment for Coop- 
erative Family 
Housing 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Chairman Spiller then turned to the third item on the 
agenda, the matter of the proposed agreement for cooperative 
family housing at UM/Amherst. He asked President Wood for 
comment. President Wood said this is another complex issue and 
that it has been under discussion for some time. He said that 
it had first come to the Committee on Finance in the spring, after 
considerable campus discussion. It had been studied by the cam- 
pus administration over the summer and had come in the fall to 
the Committee on tudent Affairs for discussion of the concept of 
cooperative management, its effect on student life and its educa-j 
tional value. The Committee on Student Affairs had expressed its; 
support of further exploration of the concept. He said that he 
thought it important for the Buildings and Grounds Committee to 
discuss the issue in terms of its responsibilities for manage- 
ment and maintenance, the relationship of the University to the 
Building Authority, and the limits of the authority of the Board 
of Trustees to act in this matter. He suggested that Dr. Gage 
speak to the campus issues, Counselor Bench on the legal aspect 
and Mr. Walker to summarize the views of the University of 
Massachusetts Tenants Association. 

Dr. Gage said that the campus administration supports 
the concept of the cooperative, but still has problems recon- 
ciling this support with the University's responsibilities to the 
Building uthority. He also said that there is the question of 
the University's obligation to the members of the union who are 
now employed in the maintenance and operation of these buildings 
Dr. Gage felt cooperative management by the students would be 
both a worthwhile learning experience and a lessening of 
financial burden, but the other issues must first be resolved. 



Mr. Bench stated that the proposed agreement presented 
several substantial legal problems: (1) it allows an excessive 
delegation of the operational responsibility for the buildings, 
assumed by the Trustees under a contract with the Building Au- 
thority; (2) it presents a constitutional problem in that by 
entering into the agreement, the University would be guaranteeing 
the performance of the cooperative and, thus, in effect pledging 
the credit of the Commonwealth, which under the Constitution 
can only be done by a two-thirds vote of the legislature. He 
further noted that the agreement would obligate the University 
to make loans to the Co-op, which would amount to a pledge of 
the Commonwealth's credit if state funds were involved, and 
would present questions of business judgment for the Trustees 
if trust funds were involved. He stated further that the pro- 
posed utility subsidy might well violate the intent of the 
Building Authority's enabling act. He noted that there was 
some legal disagreement on at least some of these matters. 



I 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



4757 



B&G Comm. 
11/18/75 



President Wood asked Mr. Bench if he was suggesting 
that there needs to be some revision of the agreement, but not 
that there could be no agreement. Mr. Bench replied affirmatively 

Mr. Kaplan spoke to the collective bargaining implica- 
tions of the proposal, pointing out its potential impact upon jobs 
represented by the union. He said this would require further 
study and discussion prior to implementation. 

Mr. Walker said that since the cooperative management 
association would be merely collecting the rents for the Univer- 
sity and would turn the money over to the University monthly, he 
did not feel that the legal status of the apartments would change 
With regard to upkeep and capital improvements, he said, there 
was a clause in the agreement which would allow the University 
to take back management of these matters should the cooperative 
fail to fulfill its part of the agreement. He said the coopera- 
tive would be in effect an employee of the University. The third 
problem, he felt, would be the matter of vacancies and he said 
there was a provision in the contract to terminate the contract 
should excessive vancacies occur. He said the real issue seemed 
to be the degree of control that the University would exercise 
over the management . 

Mr. Bench said that a problem arose from the wording of 
the contract with the Building Authority which states that the 
University may make the services of officers and employees avail- 
able to the Authority for maintenance and that the purchase of an^r 
services other than by officers and employees of the University 
would be at the expense of the Commonwealth. He said that a 
greater voice in the management of the buildings could be given 
to a student organization and that students could become employeejs 
of the University. However, a problem would arise if the coopera 
tive hired outside agents to perform certain services for the 
cooperative. 

Mrs. Robinson questioned the assumption of the UMTA 
that the cooperative could both reduce rents and increase ser- 
vices at the same time. Mr. Walker replied that it had been 
possible to do both at the University of Minnesota, where such 
a cooperative was in operation, partly through the use of voluntejer 
labor by tenants. 

Mr. Ira Horowitz of the Student Legal Services Office 
said that there was legal disagreement on several items and hoped 
that there would be an opportunity to respond to the opinion of 
the University Counsel. Chairman Spiller said that this would 
be the case that he would like a report by December 3. 



4758 



B&G Comm. 
11/18/75 



UM/Amherst — 
Naming of 
Recital Hall 
for Philip 
Bezanson 



UM/Worcester- 

Hospital 

Opening 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Wood suggested that Dr. Gage and Mr. Bench 
meet to discuss the legal and union issues, that Mr. Horowitz 
be included in legal discussions, and that when the differences 
are resolved, the Committee on Buildings and Grounds should meet 
jointly with the Committee on Finance, which must pass on the 
financial aspects of any agreement. 

Mr. Walker asked what would happen if agreement could 
not be reached on legal and constitutional questions. President 
Wood replied that the matter would probably go to the Executive 
Committee and finally to the Board of Trustees. 

Chairman Spiller next turned to the proposal for naming 
the recital hall in the Fine Arts Center at UM/Amherst for the 
late Philip T. Bezanson. Dr. Benanson was a professor of music 
and head of the Department of Music at Amherst from 1964 to 
1973. Mr. Littlefield said that Professor Bezanson was instru- 
mental in the inclusion of the Recital Hall in the plans for the 
Center. His nomination, he said, had the support of faculty 
and students in the Music Department as well as the Chancellor. 
On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Recital Hall in the Fine Arts Center 
at the Amherst Campus be named "Bezanson 
Recital Hall." 

Chairman Spiller next turned to the Status Reports and 
Informational Items asking Mr. Greig to report on the opening of 
the hospital at UM/Worcester . 

Mr. Greig said that the scheduled opening for in-patient 
admissions had been delayed to January 5, 1977. The University 
currently owns Levels 1, 2 and 3 of the hospital. Plans are 
for all mechanical spaces to be turned over to the University 
between December 1 and December 10. The University requires com- 
plete control of the mechanical floor, Level 9, before the 
hospital opens, he said, since this floor will control many of 
the vital services for the hospital. Hospital site work, he 
said, is underway. The roadways and basic work on the parking 
areas will be done this fall; finished work and landscaping will 
be done in the spring. 



Mr. Greig said that there is a critical need at the 
current time for the release of current operating funds for the 
purchase of supplies for the hospital and for the hiring of per- 
sonnel to do the work. He said that the recruitment of clinical 
staff required more time than the hiring of people in fields 
less specialized. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Chairman Spiller asked about the status of the un- 
completed work at the Medical Science building which had been 
discussed at the previous meeting. Mr. Greig replied that he 
had copies of letters from the campus to the Bureau of Building 
Construction and to the President. Chairman Spiller asked that 
these letters be turned over to the University Counsel. 

Chairman Spiller than asked Mr. Littlefield to report 
on the status of the Department of Public Works roadwork at 
UM/Amherst. He said that in order to get federal matching funds 
for this work, it is necessary to have a section of land in 
South Hadley reclassified from rural to urban. Negotiations 
are underway to accomplish this. 

At the request of Chairman Spiller, Chancellor Golino 
brought the Committee up to date on activities related to the 
Kennedy Library. He said that an exhibit of memorabilia and 
photographs related to the life of John F. Kennedy had been set 
up in the library building at the campus. The opening night 
reception had been attended by some 1200 to 1400 people. He 
commended the work of Mr. Gilmore and Dr. Weil in preparing for 
the exhibit and said that the community had been extremely 
cooperative in working with the campus and the President's 
Office to encourage the Library Corporation. He added that the 
City Council had recently passed a resolution in support of 
the UM/Boston site. 



Trustee Clark mentioned the strong interest of Dorchester 
and Columbia Point residents in the early completion of the gym 
at the Harbor Campus. Mr. Meehan said that the project synopsis 
for the foundation contract was being circulated and that biddin 
documents would be prepared shortly. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:43 p.m. 



4759 



B&G Comm. 
11/18/75 



UM/Amherst — 
DPW Roadwork 



UM/Boston- 
Kennedy 
Library 
Status 



(jGladyl Keith Hardy Q 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



UM/Boston- 
Gymnasium 



4760 



PRESENT: 



UM/Boston — 

Implementation 

of Academic 

Personnel 

Policy 

(Docs. T76-027, 

T76-028) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY 
AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

November 19, 1975; 10:00 a.m. 
Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Troy; President Wood; 
Trustees Croce and Morgenthau, Mr. Callahan representing Trustee 
Anrig; Secretary Hardy; Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice President for 
Academic Affairs; Mr. Kaplan, Assistant Vice President for Organi 
zation and Management; Father Walsh, Academic Advisor to the 
President 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Alfange, Acting Vice 
Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost; Mr. Gulko , Budget 
Director; Professor Wilkinson, Faculty Representative 

: UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Babcock, Acting Vice Chancellor 
for Academic Affairs and Provost; Ms. Boehne, Associate Provost 
for Resource Management; Professor Marshall, Faculty Representa- 
tive 

UM/Worcester : Dr. Smith, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs 
and Provost; Dr. Hittelman, Faculty Representative 



The meeting was called to order at 10:10 a.m. The 
Chairman turned first to the proposed approval of Section I and 
Section VI of University of Massachusetts at Boston Academic Per 
sonnel Policy Implementation Guidelines. These sections are 
entitled , repsectively , Delegations of Academic Appointing 
Authority (Doc. T76-027) and Special Academic Appointments (Doc. 
T76-028. Vice President Lynton reminded the Committee that the 
Academic Personnel Policy (Doc. T75-125) had required that the 
campuses develop implementation plans for the policy which would 
be subject to Trustee approval. Under the terms of the policy, 
only the two sections of the guidelines cited would require 
approval. Chancellor Golino and Mr. Babcock described the provi 
sions of these sections in detail. Trustee Morgenthau asked 
whether the faculty had been consulted in the drafting of the 
new guidelines, and Mr. Babcock replied that it had been dis- 
cussed with the deans and associate deans. He said that both 
the Academic Personnel Policy and the Implementation Guidelines 
were in the process of being reviewed by the Assembly. It was 
observed by the Chairman that these were current practices and 
that their submission to the Board was a formality to rationalize 
current practice. 



• 



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» 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



After further discussion, a motion was made and 
seconded, and it was 



4?61 



F&EP Comm. 
11/19/75 



VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the Delegations of Academic Appointing Authority 
for the University of Massachusetts at Boston, 
as set forth in Doc. T76-027. 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
Section VI, "Special Academic Appointments," 
(Doc. T76-028), of the Academic Personnel Policy 
Implementation Guidelines of the University of 
Massachusetts at Boston. 

The Committee's next item was a proposal to establish j UM/Amherst — 
a fee-assisted summer session at the Amherst campus. Vice Presi-j Fee-Assisted 
dent Lynton said that this was being presented to the Committee Summer 
for discussion of the education implications of the proposal, Session 
while the matter of the fee would be considered at a later date 
by the Trustee Finance Committee. He remarked that the President 
and the Amherst campus feel that summer instruction is almost 
as important a responsibility of the University as instruction 
during the regular academic year, but said that the budget cur- 
tailment would no longer allow the program to be supported out 
of the regular operating budget. The program had been placed 
under the aegis of the Division of Continuing Education in 1975, 
but this had been felt to be unsatisfactory because it diminished 
the control of the faculty over the content and quality of instruc- 
tion. This, then, was a compromise: the administration and 
faculty would retain control over the instruction while the sup- 
port for the program would come from student fees. It was 
observed that this would permit a much broader range of course 
offerings because it would no longer siphon off resources of the 
operating budget. 

A discussion ensued about the degree of control the 
administration has over the Continuing Education Division. It 
was said that at the University, as in many other places such 
as Brandeis and Harvard, the Division of Continuing Education, 
being essentially a commercial enterprise, operates almost like 
a foreign university. Mr. Alfange stated that he regarded this 
proposed step as the first in the process of bringing the funds 
for the support of the Division of Continuing Education under the 
supervision of the Office of the Provost. Chairman Troy sug- 
gested that Continuing Education could be academically superior 
while still being financially viable, and Mr. Alfange agreed. 
What the campus was concerned to ensure, he said, was that the 
University exercise effective responsibility for the quality of 
the programs and instruction the Division offers. Chancellor 
Golino commented that the Boston campus will also need to develop 
a fee-assisted summer session if it is to offer a summer program. 



4762 



F&EP Comm. 
11/19/75 

Academic 
Implications of 
Centralization 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Chairman Troy next turned to a discussion of the Aca- 
demic Implications of Centralization and Organization in the 
University. He mentioned that he had asked at the previous meet- 
ing that the faculty representatives lead off the discussion, 
and therefore called first on Professor Marshall to speak for 
the UM/Boston faculty. 

Professor Marshall said the faculty of the Boston 
campus was grateful for the opportunity to speak to the committee 
although it would have preferred that the discussion be of the 
Hay Report itself, rather than the more general issue of centra- 
lization and organization. The facultv was alarmed that imple- 

! mentation of the report had taken place without consultation of 
the campuses, and she cited the UM/ Amherst Rules Committee 
statement as a good expression of UM/Boston faculty feeling. 

! Perceptions differed between the President's Office and the 

I campus, but some of these differences in perception about the 
meaning and implications of the Hay Report could have been avoided 
if there had been formal discussion earlier. Although she was 

i aware that the President believed the Hay report to be merely a 
management study, the faculty believed that it had academic 
implications which it felt to be their primary responsibility. 



In the beginning she and the faculty had believed that 
the Hay Report was to be a salary study. The central office had 
consulted with the campus administration, she thought, but the 
report which was generated was never seen by the faculty. Pro- 
fessor Marshall stated that the President had held a press con- 
ference in the spring which not many members of the faculty had 
known about. The Board, she said, then adopted the report, but 
the distribution method was very odd — no deans or governance 
bodies saw it. 

In the view of the UM/Boston faculty, said Professor 
Marshall, the Hay Report has implications for academic affairs. 
She cited pages 71-73, which she said calls for a change in the 
reporting pattern of the Chancellor and Vice Chancellors on the 
campus from reporting to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. 
She cited language describing the Vice President for Academic 
Affairs as reviewing and evaluating departmental plans which sug- 
gested that the Hay Associates were unfamiliar with governance 
procedures. The report also said, she observed, that the Vice 
President for Planning would have responsibility for coordina- 
tion of academic program needs and faculty and student needs. 
She reported that the view of some of the individuals who had 
worked on the drafting of the Governance Statement (Doc. T73-098) 
had been that no vice presidential appointments would be made 
without consultation with the governance bodies. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Professor Marshall next described the Boston faculty 
as she understood it: The UM/Boston faculty sees itself as fairly 
autonomous and fairly independent, with a good deal of control 
over its own destiny and with a voice in important questions that 
affect faculty members. The faculty does not believe, she said, 
that the philosophy and nature of the system idea has been fully 
articulated so that everybody can be comfortable with it. 

Finally, Professor Marshall said it would be very help- 
ful if the governance bodies on the campuses had the opportunity 
within a limited time period to comment on the Hay Report and 
send its input to the Board. 

Chairman Troy turned to Professor Wilkinson for his 
comments. Professor Wilkinson stated that there was a deeply 
felt fear among the UM/ Amherst faculty about the process of 
centralization under the system heading. The faculty agreed 
that in a period when the University is in a difficult situation 
with respect to the budget and the Legislature it would not be 
wise for conflicts or disagreements to be expressed in an overt 
way. That should not be interpreted, however, as agreement with 
the way the system is being constructed. He stressed that the 
faculty did not wish to challenge the authority of the President 
or the Trustees. The Governance Statement does not grant to 
the faculty primary responsibility for managerial affairs, and 
the faculty is well aware of this. But the faculty does have 
views about the serious consequences of centralization under the 
heading of "system," and these he wished to point out: 



— That the further away from operational application 
of decisions the decision-makers become, the less likely are the 
implementations of the decisions to respond pragmatically to the 
needs at hand. The further policy decisions and operational 
control over policy decisions are removed from the classroom, the 
less possible it is to implement the educational encounter, which 
is the heart of the University. The faculty is disturbed, then, 
by increasing layers of administration between the Trustees and 
the classroom. 

— That the legitimate and crucial autonomy of the 
campus is being eroded. The faculty does not wish to duck its 
responsibilities, but it wishes to fulfill its responsibilities 
in as direct a way as possible. If the Chancellor or Provost 
makes mistakes, said Professor Wilkinson, the faculty can "kick 
them directly," rather than having to go up through layers of 
administration to persons not wired into the campus environment. 

— That the increasing levels of administration at the 
central office level will have to be supported by drawing funds 
from the academic budgets of the campuses. 



F&EP Comm, 
11/19/75 



4764 



F&EP Comm. 
11/19/75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It seemed to the faculty, said Professor Wilkinson, 
that the recent organizational activities of the President's 
Office were an attempt by that office to justify its own exist- 
ence, to say, "look at all the things we are doing," when in the 
faculty view it is those things which are worrisome. 

If the increased operational responsibilities of the 
President's office are combined with an increasing distance 
between the point at which decisions are made and the actual 
classroom activities, then in the faculty view that is absolutely 
deadly for the educational process. The faculty has the conceit 
that the teaching process is the most important activity in the 
University, while the administration's conceit is that effective 
administration is the most important. These conceits should be 
reconciled, he said, and suggested that what is needed is a 
spelling out of exactly what this reorganization means. At what 
points can the faculty, with its concerns for academic programs, 
have an influence on the kinds of decisions which are made in 
terms of allocation of limited resources? 



Chairman Troy called next on Dr. Hittelman, who explained 
that the distribution of the Hay Report on the Worcester campus 
had been very narrow and that therefore had been little read or 
discussed on the campus. He observed also that the Worcester 
campus does not have a governance body or procedure yet, and that 
it would be difficult to assess the impact the Hay Report would 
have on that process. Many persons with whom he had spoken had 
said that a document about the management of the University which 
has no implications for academic affairs is an impossibility, 
and he agreed that this needed much discussion. He suggested 
that the Worcester campus would need to study the Hay Report and 
the governance document currently being drafted at the same time. 



President Wood said he wished to make several points: 
(1) There had been much discussion of the Hay Report since it 
had been released, and he had had many discussions with faculty 
on the campuses, and that (2) he was frustrated and disappointed 
with the apparent failure of the faculties and the President's 
Office to reconcile their differences in perceptions despite the 
many discussions which had taken place. In any effective pro- 
cess of communication, said the President, it is as important 
to listen as it is to talk, and he had found it frustrating that 
in many of the conversations and talks he had there appeared to 
be an unwillingness to hear. 

The President remarked that the recommendations of 
the Hay Report do not of themselves constitute changes in the 
system. There had been no changes in the function of the Vice 
Presidents of Academic Affairs or Planning. The newly-created 
Vice President for Management and Business Affaris was not 
created out of the Hay Report, the President pointed out, but 



■ 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



1 



I 



I 



at the behest of the Trustee Executive Committee. He stressed 
the importance of separating what has been recommended from 
what has actually been implemented. 

President Wood noted that not even the best of faculty 
members devote themselves exclusively to teaching and research, 
and he observed that perhaps on a large multicampus and multi- 
purpose University the academic departments can no longer be an 
effective instrument of resource allocation and the setting of 
cumulative priorities. He said that in his view the Chancellors 
and Vice Chancellors have the toughest role of all, because 
they must be responsive to the President and Board above them, 
and the faculty and students below them. He said that he too 
was nostalgic for smallness, but on the system basis on which 
the University was no operating, he would vote for federalism 
rather than for conf ederalism. 

In closing, the President described Professor Wilkin- 
son's remarks about the administrators in the President's Office 
trying to justify their own existence as a disservice to those 
who have worked over the past ten months to get a budget, to open 
the teaching hospital, to maintain the continuity of the Amherst 
campus, and to find support for the Kennedy Library. 

Chairman Troy opened the issue for discussion, and 
Trustee Morgenthau read from a New York Times article which had 
stated that faculty across the country were greatly concerned with 
the creation of "superboards" and the consolidation of small, 
autonomous colleges into large statewide systems. As a faculty 
member, Trustee Morgenthau expressed concern about the dis- 
appearance from deliberations of Boards of Trustees of a concern 
for the student-teacher relationship and the whole learning 
activity. She expressed suspicion of consultants writing "sys- 
tems documents" and questioned their place in a University. She 
said she was surprised that the process had gone so far in the 
Board of Trustees without the faculties having a sense of adequ- 
ate consultation, and she said she would like that lack remedied. 
She described indepth consultation on the campuses as absolutely 
crucial. 

Trustee Morgenthau said that increased centralization 
in a time of shrinking resources should be looked at very care- 
fully, and observed that breaking up a centralized system in 
France was proving difficult because of an extant traditition of 
centralization. She had seen in the tons of documents she had 
read on this subject the statement that there would be extensive 
consultation and discussion before implementation takes place, 
and noted that this consultation had been promised as part of 
the vote to create the position of Vice President for Management 
and Business Affairs. 



4765 



F&EP Comm, 
11/19/75 



4766 



F&EP Comm. 
11/19/75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Lynton observed that the decision to create the 
system had been made after considerable input and consultation 
with the faculty by means of the Marcus document in 1969. No 
one at that time was fully aware of what that would mean in 
practice, he said, because it is difficult to know until actual 
implementation takes place. And that implementation has taken 
place gradually, the appointment of a Vice President for Academic 
Affairs being delayed until 1973. But none of this was made 
several years earlier. He remarked that only the revision of the 
lead agency system was new. It is certainly appropriate, now, 
he said, to determine whether we have developed a proper system, 
whether the proper balance between central oversight and campus 
autonomy has been achieved. But to suggest that the idea of a 
University as a system had been sprung, completely new, on the 
campuses last spring without any consultation was a distortion. 
He added that one reason that a central administration was 
necessary was that, unlike the Napoleonic system where everyone 
does the same thing, in an era of shrinking resources it was 
more than ever necessary to ensure that different campuses do 
different things. 

Chancellor Golino reaffirmed Professor Marshall's 
statement about faculty perceptions. He said there was far 
too little clarity about who can reasonably expect to do what. 
He siad that he hoped that in the consultation process these 
questions could be clarified. Chairman Troy remarked that 
there was no way to control how or if an attempted clarification 
will be perceived. Chancellor Golino agreed, and added that 
this was all the more reason to say as clearly as possible who 
has what responsibility. He criticized the Governance Statement 
at this point, saying that it greatly blurred the distinctions 
between the responsibilities and powers of the oard, President, 
Chancellors and faculty. 

Mr. Alfange introduced Professor Mainzer, Chairman of 
the Faculty Senate Ad Hoc Committee on Campus-Central Office 
Relations. Professor Mainzer spoke at length on the discussion 
which had gone before, making several points: First, that 
centralization isn't inevitable, that choices are always possible 
second, that the faculty's perceptions are not wrong about the 
intent and impact of the document, and he quoted several passages 
from the Hay Report to substantiate this point; third, that a 
change to a greater centralization within the University will 
certainly have an impact on the academic enterprise, claims to 
the contrary notwithstanding. He described the Hay Associates 
as "foolish people who misunderstood what they were supposed to 
do" and described the report as "C minus work" because it failed, 
in his view, to substantiate its appeals to trends in other 
higher education systems. 



. 



b 



b 



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I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Trustee Croce stated that Dr. Clark Kerr had made a 
statement to the American Association of Governing Boards that 
in times of fiscal stringency, centralization becomes more and 
more necessary. Trustee Morgenthau said that you could take 
diametrically the opposite position and cite equally substantial 
authorities. Trustee Croce continued that in his view the bone 
of contention here was the suggestion of the Hay Report that 
the development of academic policy could originate elsewhere 
than on the campuses. That, he said, was the biggest difference 
between old and new. He suggested that when a change in policy 
is initiated anywhere other than on the campus, it should be 
sent down throughthe Chancellor for discussion on the campus 
level, then sent back up through the Chancellor, the central 
office, and then to a Committee of the Board. While the initia- 
tion and development of policy changes would perhaps now be able 
to come from the central office, at least there would be a 
thorough airing of the proposal on the campus. Chairman Troy 
commented that such a procedure would make for very good com- 
munications . 

Father Walsh made the observation that, while the Amher 
faculty may candidly admit that they do not have the responsi- 
bility or competence to perform the management function over the 
campus operations, the Boston faculty takes the very opposite 
position; it believes that it can determine space allocations, 
which college is going to get which space, and it believes that 
it has primary responsibility for budget. He also remarked that 
the problem was not so much with the governance document per se, 
but with the different campus perceptions of it and the differing 
ways in which it has been implemented on the campus level. 

Mr. Lynton cited the persistent differences of opinion 
about what certain phrases mean, and he cautioned against fogging 
the situation any further with more general phrases without any 
resolution. He said he would welcome a specific attempt to draw 
the line between policy and operations, between what decisions can 
be made at the campus level and what decisions can be made at the 
central level. Chairman Troy agreed, and said he wanted recom- 
mendations to be accompanied by concrete illustrations. 

Mr. Kaplan urged the Committee to remember that the 
report of the Hay Associates had focused on management and busi- 
ness and not on academic affairs. He observed that the phrases 
from the report quoted by Professor Mainzer had been all from 
the section on management and administration and were concerned 
with "lead agency" and its effectiveness as an organizational 
concept. While it made recommendations concerning lead agency 
functions, the Hay Report did not mention the post of Vice 
President for Management and Business Affairs. He stated further 



4767 



F&EP Comm. 
11/19/75 



4768 



F&EP Comm, 
11/19/75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

his hope that the Committee would respect the distinction between 
the creation of this position and the academic issues that had 
been discussed during the meeting. This was especially important 
he said, in light of the Trustees' action on November 5, and the 
criticality of the position. 

Trustee Morgenthau stated that she would like to have 
the elements of the discussion which had taken place be consider- 
ed by the governing bodies of the campuses after which the 
governing bodies would present recommendations with respect to 
the relationship between the central office and the campuses to 
the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy at its February 
meeting. All present agreed that this was both possible and 
desirable, and the sense of the Committee was so expressed. 

There was no further business to come before the Com- 
mittee, and the meeting was adjourned at 12:30 p.m. 



ttJladyS Keith Hardy 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

November 26, 1975; 10:30 a.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Healey; President Wood; 
Trustees Carlson, Croce, Dennis, Gavin, Gordon, Morgenthau, 
Robertson, Rothenburger , Rowland, Spiller, Troy; Mrs. Bluestone 
representing Trustee Fielding, Mr. Callahan representing Trustee 
Anrig; Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Trustees Absent : Trustees Shaler and Weldon 

Office of the President : Mr. Janis, Senior Vice President for 
Management and Business Affairs-designate; Mr. Lynton, Senior 
Vice President for Academic Affairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President 
for Planning; Mr. Cass, Director of the Institute for Labor 
Affairs; Mr. Cooley, Assistant Vice President for Analytical 
Studies; Mr. Gartenberg, Budget Director; Mr. Kaplan, Assistant 
Vice President for Organization and Management; Mr. Searson, 
General Counsel; Father Walsh, Academic Advisor to the President 



4769 



UM/Amhersi 



Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Dent, Director of Financial 



Aid; Mr. Gulko, Budget Director; Ms. Stack, Graduate Student 
Representative; Professor Wilkinson, Faculty Representative 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Professor Marshall, Faculty 
Representative 

UM/Worcester : Acting Dean Butcher; Dr. Smith, Associate Dean 
for Academic Affairs and Provost; Dr. Hittelman, Faculty Repre- 
sentative 

Students : Karen Kelly, Vincent J. Stankiewicz, Roberto Leon, 
Lily Hu, Jim Jordan, Jay Martus, Marcia Glassman, Kenneth J. 
Somers, Karl Allen, Lucia Bruno, Henry B. Ragin, Michael J. Pill, 
Paul M. Cronin 

The meeting was called to order at 10:35 a.m. Chairman 
Healey informed all present that he planned to proceed as 
follows: the administrative officers of the University and the 
President's Office would speak first on the matter of tuition, 
then students and all others would be encouraged to express their 
views so that there would be a full and fair discussion of the 
issue by all concerned parties. He observed that the President 
and the Chancellors had been called to a legislative hearing on 
higher education at the State House and he expected them to re- 
turn later in the meeting. He called on Vice President Lynton 
to present an introduction. 



Tuition 



4770 



Exec. Comm. 
11/26/75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Lynton reviewed the history of the tuition discussion 
saying that at its October meeting the Executive Committee had 
instructed the President to provide further data relative to tui- 
tion at other Universities, and had stressed the importance of an 
adequate financial program to offset the impact of the raise. Fur 
ther position papers had thereupon been prepared, and had been 
distributed to the members of the full Board, along with the 
reactions of all the governance bodies and Chancellors to the 
possibility of raising tuition. He said the Multicampus Budget 
and Planning Committees had met the day before, and he called on 
Secretary Hardy to report on their discussion. 

Secretary Hardy briefly outlined the main points made by 
the Committees on the subject of tuition: (1) the need to con- 
sider the real cost borne by students in attending the University, 
(2) the need for improvement in support for academic support 
services as well as financial aid, (3) the need to consider the 
fact of non-mandatory fees nevertheless borne by most students, 
such as the health services fee, (3) the need to consider the 
quality of other Universities as well as their tuition rates when 
making comparisons, and (4) the fact that most financial aid is 
unavailable to graduate students, including medical students, 
therefore a financial aid package should include aid which medi- 
cal students can use. 



At the Chairman's request, Vice President Robinson ex- 
plained the data used by the President's Office in the documents 
provided to the Trustees. After reviewing the first set of 
figures, the Executive Committee had asked the President to pre- 
pare additional comparisons using as large a sample as possible 
of comparable institutions. The paper distributed to the Com- 
mittee had accordingly used all eighty public land grant universi 
ties which grant doctoral degrees. In addition, UM/Boston was 
compared with the so-called "Urban Thirteen" — a group of public 
and quasi-public universities. The 59 public medical schools 
used in the comparisons are all those for which both tuition and 
fee information was available. She observed that tuition infor- 
mation obtained from the Association of Medical Colleges was 
anonymous as to specific schools, but that the schools included 
were listed separately. 

Trustee Carlson made the comment that the figures and 
tabular material were complicated, and he questioned whether it 
would be better to discuss, first, whether it was desirable to 
raise tuition at all, and second, if it was desirable, by how 
much? If the answer to the first question was negative, the 
figures would be meaningless. Chairman Healey replied that he 
first wanted the staff papers summarized to make clear that the 
Trustees did not have information that was not available to the 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



students. He stressed that he did not wish the meeting to have 
an adversarial atmosphere, and pointed out that the Trustees and 
students wanted the same thing — high quality education at low 
cost. The Trustees would not be on the Board giving freely of 
their time and abilities if they did not have the best interests 
of the University at heart. 

Continuing her summary of the comparative data, Mrs. 
Robinson said that the University's tuition was in the bottom 
quarter of the public land grant universities nationwide, but 
that mandatory fees were very high. When tuition and fees are 
combined, the University still ranks below the median except for 
resident graduate students. If the Board should decide that 
tuition should rise, the paper included certain ranges it might 
wish to consider and their rationale. 

Mr. Gartenberg next presented an explanation of the data 
provided to the Committee on the financial need of students. His 
office, he said, had gone to the data files which were available: 
the Student Resources Survey, the Student Descriptive Question- 
naire submitted with the SAT application and the detailed records 
of all students who had applied for financial aid. The Budget 
Office had used three steps in analyzing this data: (1) to deter- 
mine who the students are and whether they are dependent or 
independent, (2) to determine what aid is available, and (3) to 
determine the distribution of aid among students in need. 

The study had found that (1) lower and lower-middle incoimp 
students constitute one-third of the Amherst student body and 
one-half of the Boston student body, (2) that federal financial 
aid had increased dramatically — from $2 million in FY 1974 to 
$9 million in FY 1975 — and that the number of students aided had 
doubled, (3) that the primary recipients of the increased aid 
were undergraduates and that (4) the individuals in the $12,000- 
$15,000 income range were hit the hardest. One way to deal with 
the students in this bracket whose unmet need factor could not be 
resolved through the University's own resources would be the 
tuition waiver. Mr. Gartenberg said it would be better to devise 
a specific financial aid plan using tuition waivers in a few 
months when federal financial aid levels are known and after a 
second verions of the Student Resources Survey, which would be 
more comprehensive than the one used earlier, is obtained. 

Chairman Healey asked Mr. Gartenberg to clarify the tim- 
ing of the approval of a tuition increase with the federal finan- 
cial aid review. Mr. Gartenberg indicated that the FY 1977 
federal financial aid review process is currently under way. If 
a tuition increase is approved at the December Board meeting, it 
could be factored into the review. Any increase approved after 
December would be too late for the FY 1977 aid allocation. 



4771 



Exec . Comm . 
11/26/75 



4772 



Exec. Comm, 
11/26/75 



UM/Worcester — 
Medical Center 
By-Laws 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Chairman Healey said he had confered with Counsel Searson 
on the possibility of tuition waivers, and he had learned that th^ 
Board had wide discretion in the use of this method. He asked 
what the administrative problems would be to figure tuition 
waivers in with the existing financial aid system. Mr. Dent of 
the Amherst campus expressed the view that it would not be 
difficult, that it would be administered the same as the other 
programs. 

Chairman Healey said he wished to open the meeting for 
presentations by students, but that since Trustee Croce would 
have to leave soon, he would turn the meeting briefly to a con- 
sideration of the proposed Medical Center By-laws. He asked Mr. 
Lynton to introduce the matter. Commenting on the great length 
of the document. Mr. Lynton observed that the bulk of it was 
devoted to standard operating arrangements for hospitals, and 
that there were only a few key sections which were being placed 
before the Trustees for consideration at this time: Section I, 
to establish the University of Massachusetts at Worcester as 
a full member of the system on a level with the Amherst and Boston 
campuses, with all University policies applying to all three 
campuses, and Section 4, the establishment of a permanent manage- 
ment Board for the hospital. The issues related to the latter 
which the Trustees should consider were the nature and functions 
of such a board, what its working relationship to the Trustees 
should be and what the mix of its membership should be. 

Chairman Healey asked whether the By-laws had the 
support of the Medical School faculty, and Trustee Gordon asked 
whether it had the approval of the Crispell Visiting Committee 
for the Medical School. Both questions were answered affirma- 
tively, and the President remarked that the Crispell Committee 
had actually recommended a stronger management board for the 
hospital. The President remarked that a few sections of the 
Medical Center By-laws required Board action prior to the open- 
ing of the Hospital and that the other sections would need to 
be considered in the next few months. 



With respect to reviewing the By-laws, the Chairman 
urged the Trustees to reserve to themselves the policy questions 
without attempting to nit-pick over the fine details. It was 
agreed that since the members of the Committee had not had time 
to study the document adequately, a decision could be made at 
a subsequent meeting of the Executive Committee. Trustee Robert 
son remarked that this kind of document was educational for the 
Trustees to read, but that it was so technical that it was 



4"#73 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



difficult for them to anticipate issues of policy which might be 
involved. He therefore asked that such issues be highlighted 
by the President in a memorandum to the Trustees. In addition, 
Trustee Gordon asked Acting Dean Butcher to provide data on the 
comparisons between this document and those of other hospitals, 
and Dr. Butcher agreed to do so. 

Before returning to the discussion on tuition, Chairman 
Healey said that the University should be grateful to the Presi- 
dent for the fine job he had done in winning the Kennedy Library 
for the University of Massachusetts at Boston. His success de- 
serves the appreciation of the Board, he said, and he added that 
the Library will still be of great value to the University a 
hundred years from today. President Wood pointed out the work 
done by Vice President Robinson, Chancellor Golino and Trustee 
Clark in persuading the Kennedy Corporation to build the library 
on the Harbor Campus, and said they deserved the thanks of the 
Board. 

At this point, Chairman Healey directed the Board's 
attention back to the subject of tuition, and called on student 
Trustee Gavin to speak. Trustee Gavin informed the Committee 
that she and Kenneth Somers, Speaker of the UM/ Amherst Under- 
graduate Student Senate, would make a dual presentation. She 
yielded to Mr. Somers for a discussion of fiscal facts of a 
tuition increase. Mr. Somers pointed to several charts, the firs 
of which related to projected increases in student fees at the 
University. He observed that his calculations projected an 
increase in fees of $425 from FY 1976 to FY 1977. A second chart 
showed that a tuition increase of 100 percent would still yield 
a tiny portion of revenue toward reduction of the deficit of the 
Commonwealth. He then described an increase in tuition as puttin 
the cart before the horse, since it cannot be known with certainty 
how much federal financial aid will be forthcoming for FY 1977. 
He predicted that many students would drop out if the tuition 
were raised. Chairman Healey asked what the impact would be if 
students had time to plan and if the raise were scaled gradually. 
Mr. Somers replied that that would certainly be more palatable 
to the students. 

A discussion of the opportunities for students to take 
advantage of loans ensued. Both Chairman Healey and Trustee 
Gordon spoke against the idea, because it tended to handicap a 
person with a tremendous debt early in life, and because there 
was a high delinquency rate of late, which indicated that debts 
are being incurred which many young people are unable to handle. 



Chairman Healey said that one important fact was that 
access to the University was denied to many because, unlike the 
universal system of public school education, a selection process 
takes place for entry into postsecondary education which tends 



Exec. Coram. 
11/26/75 



Kennedy 
Library 



Tuition 



4774 



Exec. Comm. 
11/26/75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



to favor the children of affluent parents whose secondary school 
i preparation is better and who can afford to attend private uni- 
versities. On the other hand, he said, people of this income 
bracket also pay higher taxes which contribute to the kind of 
federal financial aid grants which were discussed earlier, so 
that it could be said that these students are entitled to attend 
the University, just as they are entitled to attend the public 
schools . 

Concluding his presentation, Mr. Somers said that he 
would like to have the Board make a definite commitment by vote 
to provide waivers, not just make a vague statement of its hope 
to do so. He added that he found it difficult to be optimistic 
about forthcoming federal aid as outlined in the staff papers, 
because the pattern of the last several years had been to reduce 
federal support to social services, such as education. 

Trustee Gavin next read a long statement on the principled 
opposition of students to a tuition raise. Her statement, she 
said, had been prepared by a number of students. Among the points 
she made were that both the Governor and Secretary Parks had 
said that the fat could be trimmed out of the higher educational 
budget without tuition increases, and that President Wood had 
said in a speech in 1971 that tuition increases are always 
accompanied by promises of increased financial aid which seldom 
materialize. 

She said the Trustees should not follow the recommendations 
of the Carnegie Committee on Higher Education which she said was 
meeting increasing opposition among different groups in the 
country, and criticized its advocacy of reduction in access to 
higher education. She spoke next on what the students felt to 
be the role of international business in reducing government 
spending to increase available capital, thus serving its needs 
but doing a disservice to people in need. She reminded the Board 
of its responsibility to serve human idealism, and contrasted 
its membership — which she described as "comfortable" — to the 
situation of students — which she described as "unemployed." 



Trustee Rothenburger next addressed the Committee on be- 
half of the UM/Boston students. He said students felt a raise 
in tuition to be adding a burden to those least able to support 
it, and seconded Mr. Somers 's skepticism about the increases in 
federal aid to education. He agreed with Mr. Somers that the 
use of tuition waivers on the basis of unmet need would be an 
administrative disaster. He also agreed that loans were not a 
practical solution to the problems of unmet financial need of 
students, and revealed that he will have a substantial debt when 
he finishes college. Loans through the Higher Education Loan 
Plan were increasingly defaulted, he added. 



I 



' 



I 



4775 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Ms. Stack spoke on behalf of the graduate students, 
and pointed out that they are more likely than undergraduate 
students to be self-supporting, yet are less able to get financial 
aid. As for tuition waivers, she observed that under current 
University policy, tuition waivers were granted to graduate stu- 
dents who were teaching assistants. However, teaching assist- 
antships had been drastically reduced on the Amherst campus. 

Roberto Leon of the Amherst campus foreign student body 
described the disastrous effects a tuition raise would have on 
foreign students, who cannot get jobs and who do not have the 
time or the possibility of transferring to another public uni- 
versity at this late hour. Ms. Lily Hu seconded this point, and 
added that many foreign students must leave the country immedi- 
ately if they drop out of school. Chairman Healey observed that 
the Legislature had raised tuition for out-of-state students — 
which included foreign students — and that the matter was there- 
fore out of the Board's hands. He said further that it was this 
trend which concerned him, and restated a point made by Mrs. 
Robinson earlier — that if the Trustees "dig in their heels" 
against public pressure for a tuition raise, the Legislature may 
step in and take the power of decision one way or the other away 
from them. 



Henry Ragin, Co-President of the Student Government 
Association, made the point that raising tuition would have the 
affect of leaving the affluent in place, indeed increasing their 
numbers, while squeezing out the less affluent. The student body 
he said, would be composed of the rich and the poor. He also 
expressed a lack of confidence that the federal aid spoken of for 
FY 1977 will be forthcoming. 

Both Trustees Gordon and Rowland raised the question of 
what would happen if the University refused to respond to calls 
for a raise in tuition. Trustee Rowland doubted whether the 
Board could prevail in such a stand, and Trustee Gordon stated 
that if the University were to lose its autonomy, it would go 
back to being "a cow college." He asked that the students under- 
stand the Trustees' concern about this danger. 

Trustee Morgenthau expressed admiration for the quality 
of the students' presentation, and Trustee Rowland remarked 
that over the years she had found students' presentations on 
important issues to be of a high quality. Several students 
emphasized that they had not intended to offend anybody by their 
presentation, but stressed that their involvement in the issue 
caused them to speak strongly. 



Exec. Comm, 
11/26/75 



was 



At 1:25 p.m. a motion was made and seconded, and it 



VOTED: To enter executive session to discuss tuition. 



4776 



Exec. Comm. 
11/26/75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



At 2:45 it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : to end the executive session. 

After the executive session it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees establish 
for the 1978-79 academic year the following annual 
tuition rates: $525 for undergraduate students 
who are residents of the Commonwealth; $900 for 
students at the Medical School; and $670 for 
graduate students who are residents of the 
Commonwealth. To recommend further that present 
rates of tuition be increased in four stages 
commencing with the fall semester of 1976 in 
accordance with the following schedule. 



ACADEMIC YEAR 1976-77 

Fall Sem. Spring Sem. 
1976 1977 



Total 



Undergraduate 
(resident) 


161. 


184. 


$345. 


Medical School 315. 345. 


$660. 


Graduate 

(resident) 


236. 


258. 


$494 



ACADEMIC YEAR 1977-78 



Fall Sem. 
1977 



Spring Sem. 
1978 



Total 



Undergraduate 
(resident) 


218. 


262.50 


$48050 


Medical School 390. 450. $840. 


Graduate 

(resident) 


291. 


335. 


$626. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



ACADEMIC YEAR 1978-79 

Fall Sem. Spring Sem. 
1978 1979 



Total 



I 



II 



Undergraduate 
(resident) 


1 

262. 


50 


262. 


50 




$525. 


Medical School 


450. 




450. 






$900. 


Graduate 

(resident) 


335. 




335. 






$670. 



The foregoing tuition rates are to take 
effect on the condition that a financial 
aid program for implementation in the fall 
semester of 1976 be established and ap- 
proved by the Board of Trustees on or 
before May 5, 1976; further that said fin- 
ancial aid program shall include provision 
for tuition waivers, partial or otherwise, 
for students with demonstrated financial 
need, which need shall be determined in 
accordance with federally approved need 
analysis procedures. 

There was no further business to come before the Com- 
mittee, and the meeting was adjourned at 2:46 p.m. 



4777 



Exec. Coram. 
11/26/75 



olladyJ Keith Hardy * 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4778 



Budget Comm. 
11/26/75 



PRESENT: 



FY 1977 

Budget 

Request 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON THE BUDGET 

November 26, 1975; 1:30 p.m. 

Office of the President 

One Washington Mall 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Carlson; President Wood; 
Trustees Rothenburger and Troy; Secretary Hardy; Ms. Judd, 
recorder 

Trustees Absent : Trustees Breyer, Croce, Gordon 

Office of the President : Mr. Janis, Senior Vice President for 
Management and Business Affairs; Mr. Gartenberg, Budget Director; 
Mrs. Hanson, Associate Budget Director; Mr. Lewis, Staff Associate, 
| Budget Office 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Gulko, Budget Director; 
Professor Wilkinson, Faculty Representative 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Mr. Baxter, Budget Director; 
Professor Marshall, Faculty Representative 

UM/Worcester : Acting Dean Butcher; Mr. Cathey, Controller; Mr. 
Stockwell, Associate Dean for Administrative Affairs and Hospital 
Director; Dr. Hittelman, Faculty Representative 

Guests : Mr. Don Boyce, Mr. Robert Bryan, Ms. Bonnie J. Cain, 
Mr. Stephen McLaughlin, students, UM/ Amherst; Mr. Milton Kirstein 
UM/Boston Student Trustee staff 

The meeting was convened at 2:50 p.m. Chairman Carlson 
began by noting that a quorum was not present, but that discus- 
sion of the FY 1977 Budget Request must take place in view of the 
fact that it must be filed with the Bureau of the Budget and the 
Executive Office of Educational Affairs. At its December 3 meet- 
ing, the Budget Committee would ratify the sense of this after- 
noon's discussion. He then asked President Wood for his comments. 

President Wood reviewed the actions taken by the Board 
at its November 5 meeting, stating that the University was work- 
ing as rapidly and expeditiously as possible in preparing a bud- 
get for Executive branch consideration. Essentially, he said, 
the budget represents an effort to respond to the concerns of 
the campuses that quality education be maintained while projected 
enrollments be met. The budget request is higher than the FY 
1976 appropriation but it is lower than last year's request. It 
represents the minimal needs of the University; it does not 
relieve the University of the tight budget situation which has 
existed for the last year and a half nor does it alleviate faculty 
and student concerns. It is, he said, a survival budget. 



I 



I 



779 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mrs. Hanson described the FY 1977 Budget Request for the 
Committee, saying that it would not fully restore the University 
to 1975 levels, would not allow for the filling of every position 
currently vacant, and would only allow for continued development 
in Colleges III and IV at UM/Boston and at the Medical School. 
She noted that the $11.1 million budget request for the University 
Hospital has been separated from that of the other three academic 
sectors. The Hospital, she added, is expected to generate revenu^ 
of about $8.1 million next year. 



Mrs. Hanson then reviewed a summary of special cate- 
gories in the FY 1977 Budget Request, giving details regarding 
scholarship funds, aid to disadvantaged students, the senior 
internship program for UM/Amherst M.P.A. students, the General 
Court fellowship and legislative internship programs at UM/ 
Boston, the restoration of Federal Matching funds, and the UM/ 
Boston College IV contract with Northeastern University. She 
then referred to the budget for the Institute for Governmental 
Services for which a substantial increase had been asked in order 
to allow for an expansion of its educational and public services 
throughout the Commonwealth. The request for the President's 
office, she said, was based upon the precedent of this year's 
direct funding approach and did not represent a substantial 
increase. Chairman Carlson pointed out the total request was 
a stand-off figure because of the lateness of the approval of 
the FY 1976 budget. 



Chairman Carlson asked for comments from each of the 
campuses with regard to the FY 1977 requests. Mr. Gulko of the 
Amherst campus began by saying that the request presumed a con- 
tinuation of present enrollment levels and did not include any 
major programmatic increases. Virtually all of the proposed 
increase in the program area was for academic programs, academic 
support and student services. The major increase, he said, was 
in the personnel account, in order to fill the current 140 
faculty vacancies and 200 support position vacancies. He then 
reviewed for the Committee the requests in the subsidiary account^ 



Budget Coram , 
11/26/75 



At this point, Mr. Steve McLaughlin and Mr. Don Boyce, 
members of the Graduate Student Senate Task Force on the Budget 
Cuts, UM/Amherst, who had asked to speak to the Committee, were 
introduced. Mr. McLaughlin read a portion of the Task Force's 
report which outlined the consequences of budget cuts on the 
University and on public higher education. The report stated: 
"(1) that there already has been a serious reduction in the 
quality of education at UMass/A, (2) that this problem will con- 
tinue given the present rationale for funding cited by the 
State's government, (3) that this crisis could not have been 
averted by more efficient management under the University's 
fiscal autonomy powers, and (4) that certain solutions to the 
problem will be more costly in terms of money to the state govern- 
ment and to the taxpayers in the immediate and long range future. 



UM/Amherst — 
Graduate 
Student Task 
Force on the 
Budget Cuts 



4780 



Budget Comm, 
11/26/75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

He then gave examples from the report of how quality education is 
threatened by a 10 percent budget cut which would result in effect 
as a 40 to 50 percent cut in operating expenses for each Univer- 
sity department. By these examples, the Task Force hoped to 
convey the sense that "The picture we are painting is not one of 
cuts in the 'icing on the cake, 1 but of severe cuts 'to the bone.' 
The investment that the people of Massachusetts have made in their 
public higher education is a good one — one that should be pro- 
tected from deterioration for future generations of Massachusetts 
citizens. The evidence that the Task Force has accumulated, 
however, strongly indicated that this investment in quality public 
higher education is being slowley and perhaps irreparable eroded.! 

Chairman Carlson said that the report was a valuable 
and constructive document — the type of support needed by the 
Trustees in order to convince legislators of the consequences 
of the kinds of actions that are being taken. He asked that 
Secretary Hardy distribute copies to the entire Board. Presi- 
dent Wood remarked that in terms of timeliness, the report was 
most appropriate and could not have been produced by any other 
group but the Graduate Student Senate. 

Mr. Boyce concluded by stating that he believed that a 
cut below the budget request would result in a decrease in num- 
bers of faculty, undergraduate and graduate students which would 
in turn result in the loss of $7 million in non-state revenue. 
Graduate students perform the skilled manpower needed for re- 
search projects for the federal government; weakening the gradu- 
ate program, he said, would weaken the standing of the Amherst 
campus and the entire University as far as consideration for 
federal grant monies are concerned. 



Mr. Gulko commended Mr. McLaughlin and Mr. Boyce on 
their presentation at the public budget hearings last week. 
Chancellor Golino added that while it was important that aca- 
demicians be educated as to the pressures on the legislators, it 
was equally important that the legislators be educated as to 
pressures on the students of the University by such documents 
and presentations. 

Chairman Carlson asked Chancellor Golino to comment on 
the budget request for the Boston campus. He said that the 
campus was asking for enough money to unfreeze present positions 
in order to implement extant programs at the same enrollment 
level. With a $19.3 million budget, not every position would be 
funded but the campus would be in a position to operate somewhat 
satisfactorily and could free enough positions to make the pro- 
grams workable. At Chairman Carlson's request, Mr. Baxter re- 
viewed briefly the projected budget for the personnel accounts, 
pointing out that the $1.9 million adjustment represented the 
additional cost necessary to fund the 1000 positions authorized 
by the legislature. Trustee Rothenburger emphasized the import- 
ance of filling faculty positions in Colleges III and IV. 






i 



L 






I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Reporting for the Worcester campus, Acting Dean Butcher 
said that 71 new faculty positions in the Medical School were 
being requested but that funding was for only 30 of those posi- 
tions, 15 of them for five months. The need for those positions 
was a very serious one in view of the University Hospital's 
opening. Programmatically , he said, the Medical School is in- 
creasing each year with a total of 304 students expected next 
year. Next he turned to the hospital request and said that the 
budget figure appears to be a considerable increase, but it shoulc 
be remembered that FY 1977 will be the first full year of opera- 
tion for the hospital; and, if the FY 1976 budget were annualized, 
a comparison of figures would show a lesser increase. In addi- 
tion, 256 new positions were requested. The hospital generates 
revenue, and recent estimated earnings for FY 1977 indicate a 
level of $8.1 million; therefore, the anticipated net deficit of 
hospital operation is $3,041 million. In FY 1976, the antici- 
pated net is $3.5 million. He pointed out that the hospital 
comes closer to breaking even the fuller it gets. Chairman 
Carlson said that the projected decline of the net deficit is a 
key factor. 

There being no further discussion, the meeting adjourned 
at 3:45 p.m. 



^ladysl Keith Hardy r 
Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



4781 



Budget Comm, 
11/26/75 



4782 



PRESENT: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

December 3, 1975; 11:00 a.m. 
Room 904-908, Campus Center 
University of Massachusetts/Amherst 

Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Healey; President Wood; 



Trustees Abrams, Carlson, Clark, Croce, Dennis, Eddy, Gavin, 
Morgenthau, Robertson, Rothenburger , Rowland, Shaler, Shearer, 
Troy, Spiller, Weldon; Mr. Callahan representing Trustee Anrig; 
Mrs. Bluestone representing Trustee Fielding; Secretary Parks 
representing Trustee Dukakis; Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson: 
Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Office of the President: Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice President for 



Academic Affairs; Mrs. Robinson, Vice President for Planning; Mr. 
Cooley, Assistant Vice President for Analytical Studies; Mr. 
Gartenberg, Budget Director; Mrs. Hanson, Associate Budget 
Director; Mr. O'Leary, Assistant Counsel; Mr. White, Assistant to 
the President 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Professor Wilkinson, Faculty 
Representative; Ms. Stack, Graduate Student Representative 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Golino; Professor Marshall, Faculty 
Representative 

UM/Worcester : Dr. Smith, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs 
and Provost; Dr. Hittelman, Faculty Representative 

Students : Henry Ragin, Co-President of the Student Government 
Association; Michael Federow, Graduate Student Senate 

The meeting was called to order at 11:15 a.m. The Chair- 
man called upon President Wood, who reminded the members of the 
Executive Committee, and informed the Trustees present who had 
not attended the Executive Committee meeting of November 26, 
that the Committee had voted to place tuition in the modal posi- 
tion with respect to a selection of other land grant universi- 
ties, taking into account both fee structure and tuition, by 
making four step-increases on a rising slope so that students 
would have as much time as possible to plan for the increase. 
The President said the Committee had voted to recommend that the 
increase be firmly conditioned on the development of adequate 
financial aid, including some program for tuition waivers, to 
offset its effect on those least able to pay. He added that 
this principle had also been adopted with respect to the Medical 
School, but the specific figures for the Medical School and for 
nonresident graudate students had not been adopted. The motion 
presently before the Committee had been amended to remedy these 
omissions . 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Shaler apologized for having missed several meet- 
ings of the Committee due to illness, and asked if the comparison 
of tuition and fees with the 81 land grant universities had also 
included a comparison of their room and board fees. Vice Presi- 
dent Robinson indicated that it had not, because only a portion 
of the students are required to pay room and board, and because 
there were problems of comparability. Trustee Shaler said he 
believed this to be important data, because the Amherst campus 
is located in a small town and many students are required to live 
in dormitories. He then asked whether the comparisons had re- 
vealed the practice at other universities to make tuition avail- 
able to the university, rather than having it revert to the 
general fund, as in Massachusetts. The answer was that different 
states have different systems. President Wood stated his opposi- 
tion to tying tuition to the University budget, which he was 
afraid would happen if the tuition revenues came directly to the 
University. Chancellor Bromery observed that the costs of attend- 
ance at the Amherst campus were $480 above the national median, 
because of the debts on the residence halls and the Campus Center. 
Trustee Shaler said he respected the President's position, but 
said he wished he had had this comparative information on where 
tuition revenues go, since he felt that the term "tuition" was 
misleading. He described it as a tax. Vice President Robinson 
said that tuition revenue at the State University of New York 
goes to the University for the purpose of retiring the debt 
service on academic facilities. 

Trustee Croce asked whether the Committee had taken a 
firm position on waivers, and the President said that he would 
have a report on the administration of waivers, and that the 
figures on federal aid levels would also be available. He said 
he would also seek to secure the information asked by Trustee 
Shaler on what happens to tuition revenues in other institutions. 



The Chairman said that it would be risky to relate tuition 
to the budget of the University, because a tuition raise might 
then come to be a quid pro quo for any budget increase. Chancel- 
lor Bromery expressed his surprise about how relatively unin- 
formed the legislators as a whole are about the use of the fee 
revenue. He pointed out that room and board fees are used for 
debt service. Chairman Healey observed that, during the late 
fifties, the Legislature had exerted great pressure on the 
Trustees to build dormitories to accomodate the crush of appli- 
cants, but would not provide capital outlay funds for these 
buildings. This was why they had been financed on a self- 
liquidating basis, and also was why some of the fees were high. 

Trustee Shaler asked how optimistic the University was 
about receiving more federal financial aid. Mr. Gartenberg 
explained that the Basic Educational Opportunity Grants were 
available to all undergraduates, that the funds had been appro- 
priated by Congress and that it was mainly a question of alloca- 
tion. Trustee Troy said that he had heard at the BHE meeting 



45 



Exec. Comm, 
12/3/75 



4784 



Exec. Comm. 
12/3/75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

estimates of as much as $20-30 million in federal aid to the 
Commonwealth for FY 1977. 

Trustee Eddy said she had been appalled to read that only 
a small portion of state scholarship aid goes to public colleges 
and universities, and she wondered whether it would be wise for 
the Board to take a stand on this. The President replied that 
the total amount was so small in any case, that to make an issue 
about how little the public sector gets would be counterproduct- 
ive, because of the hard feelings which would be engendered with- 
in the private sector. He said it was his hope that with the 
increase in Federal dollars, funds from the state scholarship 
program could be used to help those students who were ineligible 
for federal aid. 

The discussion turned to the second proposed vote on 
tuition, which would establish the level of tuition for non-resi- 
dent undergraduates on the basis of 95 percent of the cost of 
instruction as mandated by state law. The President explained 
that the law left it to the Board to determine the cost, which 
presented the problem of method of calculation: if the cost of 
instruction was determined by excluding the costs of programs not 
directly related to the teaching process, the University would 
face the argument that the figure established should be multi- 
plied by the number of students enrolled and used as the basis 
for the University budget. If, on the other hand, all the real 
expenses of the academic enterprise were included, the result- 
ing figure would be staggering for nonresident undergraduates. 
It was his judgment that the Trustees should strive for the low 
figure and take their chances with the Budget. The President's 
staff then undertook to explain the exact process by which the 
figure had been arrived at. 



Trustee Eddy asked how many nonresidents become residents 
within a few years of attending the University. Treasurer John- 
son explained that the University had a firm policy for establish-* 
ing residency, which requires both the establishment of domicile 
and one year's residence before application to the University. 
Trustee Eddy observed that students can vote upon establishing 
residency in the town of Amherst, and asked whether this did not 
qualify them for resident status. It was explained that the 
right to vote does not require establishment of domicile, since 
domicile entails the expressed intention to make one's permanent 
home in the Commonwealth. 

Ms. Stack described the unfortunate effects of this tui- 
tion raise on graduate students, a large proportion of whom are 
out-of-state, and other effects were described by other students 
Chairman Healey reminded all present that the Board had no 
choice, since the raise had been mandated by state law. He des- 
cribed it as a "bludgeon" approach to the tuition issue. 



. 



i 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Robertson asked why it was beneficial to have non- 
resident students on the campuses, and Professor Wilkinson explain 
ed that, in the faculty view, they were crucial to the campus, 
particularly graduate students. He said that the graduate stu- 
dents have reached the level of professional training, and they 
are in a position to interact with undergraduates in a beneficial 
way. He said it was necessary to choose graudate students from 
a national pool if they were to attract the top quality. Trustee 
Morgenthau queried the possibility of developing reciprocal tui- 
tion arrangements with universities nationally. President Wood 
said such an arrangement was already in effect with New England 
public universities, and said it would be possible to explore 
the idea of developing such a program nationally. Trustee Carlson 
observed that this law raising tuition for nonresident students 
might not be permanent, and suggested that an educative effort 
as to its harmful effects take place in the Legislature. 

Secretary Parks read a letter from Governor Dukakis to 
the Chairman which stated that he and Secretary Parks had seen 
the staff papers prepared for the Executive ommittee and had 
studied them along with the testimony given by students at the 
meeting of November 26. He said the papers had indicated that 
a tuition raise of from $500-600 would be appropriate, but added 
that he could support the vote only if the Board made "a specific 
binding commitment to a tuition waiver policy and to the provi- 
sion of other forms of financial aid sufficient to ensure that 
access to the University will not be denied to any student because 
of his or her financial circumstances." 

The Governor further stated in his letter that the Board 
should include in the tuition vote "a commitment to establish 
comprehensive control at the Board level over fees charged at 
the campuses, so that the University's ostensible commitment to 
low student costs will not be eroded through the back door of 
campus-level fee increases." 

The President informed Secretary Parks that the vote passec 
by the Executive Committee meeting of November 26 and as pro- 
posed for this meeting contained the provision on financial aid 
that the Governor had advocated in his letter. He also observed 
that all fees were presently established by the Board and it was 
the sense of the Executive Committee to keep the fees down. 
Secretary Parks said his vote would hinge on the guarantee that 
a ceiling on fees be imposed. Chancellor Bromery remarked that 
he saw no way to do that and fulfill the University's obligation 
to pay off its bonds. Mr. Gartenberg observed that the proposed 
vote would require the financial need of students to be computed 
according to "federally established need analysis procedures," 
and he added that these procedures take into account the total 
cost to students, not just that of tuition. 



4785 



Exec. Comm, 
12/3/75 



4786 



Exec. Comm. 
12/3/75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Secretary Parks added that before the tuition is raised, 
the Board should make a commitment that equal access to the Uni- 
versity will not be impaired by reason of inability to pay. Only 
when the University was sure of how it would accomplish this 
should it raise tuition. A long discussion ensued about the 
effect of the language of the proposed vote, with Secretary Parks 
wishing to make it less "ambivalent" and the Chairman taking the 
position that the language was effective as it was. 

Both Chairman Healey and Trustee Carlson said that the 
Board could not make a statement, as part of this vote, which 
might contractually obligate the University to ensure that no 
student be denied access. Trustee Carlson said it would be nec- 
essary to to to zero tuition and to develop a document of 100 
pages which, he said, would take six months to write. Chairman 
Healey emphasized that this principle was one to which all 
Trustees were committed, but he said that such a general policy 
statement did not belong in a tuition vote. 

Trustee Rothenburger recalled that, at the Executive Com- 
mittee meeting of November 26, Trustee Gordon had remarked that 
the intent of the Executive Committee was that if an adequate 
| financial aid plan were not developed which was satisfactory to 
the Trustees, the tuition raise would be a nullity. Had he 
understood this correctly? The Committee assured him that he 
had . 

Trustee Shaler said he had read the staff papers carefully, 
but in nothing he had read had he seen any explanation of the 
need to raise tuition. For that reason, he said, he could not 
support the motion. 

Trustee Rothenburger alluded to the fear expressed by the 
Executive Committee that failing to respond to calls for a raise 
in tuition would lead to the loss of the University's fiscal 
autonomy. He and other students had spoken with Senate President 
Harrington and House Speaker McGee, and they had indicated that 
there was no such danger. Chairman Healey responded that this 
action was frequently under contemplation by the Legislature and 
he repeated his concern about its happening. 

Secretary Parks asked if the figure in the motion could 
be translated into the real cost of the student; that is, that 
a chart showing the other costs to students of attending the 
University be included with the motion, since the important 
figure was the total cost to the student. Trustee Morgenthau 
stated her view that such a chart might be useful. The Chair- 
man and others argued that it would be useful and appropriate 
to publicize such information in a press release, but that to 
put it into the motion would have the effect of establishing 
the fees as well as the tuition at a given level. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



There was no further discussion, and it was therefore 



VOTED : 



That the November 26, 1975 vote of the Execu- 
tive Committee recommending that the Board of 
Trustees establish new tuition rates be amend- 
ed by inserting in place thereof the vote 
attached hereto. 

To recommend that the Board of Trustees es- 
tablish for the 1978-79 academic year the 
following annual tuition rates: $525 for 
undergraduate students who are residents of 
the Commonwealth; $900 for students at the 
Medical School; $670 for graduate students 
who are residents of the Commonwealth; and 
$1,550 for graduate students who are not 
residents of the Commonwealth. To recom- 
ment further that the present rates of 
tuition be increased in four stages com- 
mencing with the fall semester of 1976 
in accordance with the following schedule: 



ACADEMIC YEAR 1976-77 



Fall Sem. 
1976 



Spring Sem. 
1977 



Total 



Undergraduate 
(resident) 



161. 



184. 



$345 



Medical School 



Graduate 
(resident) 



315. 



236. 



345. 



$660, 



258. 



Graduate 

(non- , 
resident) 



482. 



547. 



$494 



$1,029 



4787 



Exec . Comm . 
12/3/75 



ACADEMIC YEAR 1977-78 



Fall Sem. 
1976 



Spring Sem, 
1977 



Total 



Undergraduate 
(resident) 



218. 



262.50 



$480.50 



Medical School 



390. 



450. 



$840. 



Graduate 
(resident) 

Graduate 
(non- 
resident) 



291. 



335 



775. 



775. 



$626. 



$1,550 



4788 



Exec. Coram. 
12/3/75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



ACADEMIC YEAR 1978-79 

Fall Sem. Spring Sem. 
1978 1979 



Total 



L 



Undergraduate 

(resident) 262.50 262.50 $525 


Medical School 450. 450. $900 


Graduate 

(resident) 335. 335. $670 
■ 


Graduate 

resident) 775. 775. 
i 1 


$1,550. 
i 



The foregoing tuition rates are to take 
effect on the condition that a financial aid 
program for implementation in the fall sem- 
ester of 1976 be established and approved by 
the Board of Trustees on or before May 5, 
1976; further that said financial aid program 
shall include provision for tuition waivers, 
partial or otherwise, for students with 
demonstrated financial need, which need shall 
be determinted in accordance with federally 
approved need analysis procedures. 

Trustee Shaler cast a negative vote. 

The next action was the certification of a tuition level 
for nonresident undergraduates based on 95 percent of the cost 
of instruction, as required by state law. A motion was made and 
seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees pur- 
suant to the provisions of Chapter 684 of the 
Acts of 1975 (the appropriation act for Fiscal 
Year 1976) , certify that the average annual 
cost of instruction for each undergraduate 
student at the University of Massachusetts is 
$1,598; further, that effective January 1, 
1976, the tuition charged to all non-resident 
undergraduate students at the University of 
Massachusetts shall be $1,550 per year or 
$775 per semester; provided, however, that 
students participating in the New England 
Regional Student Program shall not be affect- 
ed by this vote. 



i 



i 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Next the Chairman presented another action required by 
state law: the establishment of an application fee. Upon motion 
made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees, pur- 
suant to the provisions of Chapter 684 of the 
Acts of 1975 (the appropriation act for Fiscal 
Year 1976) , establish an application fee of $10 
for each applicant for admission to the Univer- 
sity who is a resident of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, and an application fee of $25 
for each such applicant who is not a resident 
of the Commonwealth; provided, however, such 
fees shall not be charged to any applicant for 
admission to a program established for the dis- 
advantaged, or to any student who shall have 
received an examination fee waiver from the 
College Entrance Examination Board. The adminis- 
tration at each campus is hereby directed to 
take reasonable steps to collect said fees for 
all applications received on or after July 1, 
1975. 

At the Chairman's request, Chancellor Golino explained the 
proposed Mid-Semester Tuition Arrangements for College III stu- 
dents at UM/Boston. This was a pilot program under which fifteen 
students had been admitted to the College in mid-semester. Chan- 
cellor Golino wished for authorization to charge these students a 
reduced tuition rate. A motion was made, seconded and it was: 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the following schedule of tuition and fees 
be established for fifteen students partici- 
pating in a fall semester pilot program at 
the University of Massachusetts at Boston, 
College III, beginning November 1, 1975: 

Tuition (in-state $75.00 

Tuition (out-of-state) $275.00 

Health Services Fee: $11.00 

Student Activities Fee: $ 7.50 

The President pointed out to the members of the Committee 
that copies of the proposed Interagency Agreement #1 (Doc. T76- 
031) between the University and the Executive Office of Human 
Services had been distributed. Action would be requested at a 
subsequent meeting. 

Chairman Healey reminded the Committee of the need for a 
nominating committee to recommend Committee assignments and to 
recommend to the Trustees appointment of Board officers for 



4789 



Exec. Comm. 
12/3/75 

Application 
Fee 



UM/Boston — 
Mid-Semester 
Tuition for 
College III 



Nominating 
Committee 



4790 



Exec. Comm. 
12/3/75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



consideration at the annual meeting in February, 
volunteers. 



He asked for 



i 



Finally, Chairman Healey reminded the Committee of 
Trustee Abrams's suggestion at the October meeting that a stand- 
ing committee be established to deal with increasingly complica- 
ted matters relating to the Medical School and Hospital which 
would be coming before the Board in the future. He said he 
wished the Executive Committee to recommend that the Board estab- 
lish such a Committee, pending revision of the By-laws, and that 
it recommend that the Board authorize the Chairman to appoint its 
members. He said that he would, upon authorization of the Board 
to so act, appoint the medical members of the Board — Drs . Abrams, 
Croce, Fielding, and Okin — and Trustee Robertson because of his 
special interest in and proximity to the Worcester campus, to 
this Committee. A motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees estab- 
lish, pending a revision of the Trustee By-laws, 
a standing committee of the Board to be called 
the Health Affairs Committee which shall review, 
and make appropriate recommendations to the 
Board with respect to, matters relating to the 
Medical School and the University hospital. 
Further to recommend that the Board authorize 
the Chairman to appoint five to seven members 
of said Committee. 

There was no further business to come before the Committee, 
and the meeting was accordingly adjourned at 1:05 p.m. 



\ 



tbladyi Keith Hardy Q 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



i 



PRESENT: 



ABSENT: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON THE BUDGET 

December 3, 1975; 12:30 p.m. 
Room 1001-1002, Campus Center 
University of Massachusetts/Amherst 

Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Carlson; President Wood; 
Trustees Croce, Rothenburger and Troy; Miss Eichel, recorder 

Office of the President : Mr. Gartenberg, Budget Director; Mrs 
Hanson, Associate Budget Director; Mr. Lewis, Staff Assistant, 
Budget Office 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Gulko, Budget Director 

UM/Worcester : Dr. Smith, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs 
and Provost 

Trustees Breyer and Gordon 



4791 



Maintenance 



Budget Request 
FY 1977 



The meeting was called to order at 1:30 p.m. by Chairman 
Carlson. The Chairman asked that copies of Maintenance Budget 
Request, Fiscal Year 1977 (Doc. T76-033 be distributed to those 

members of the Committee who had not yet received it. This docu-j (Doc. T76-033) 
ment , he said, contained only a very minor change in the total 
figures from the figures discussed and approved in principle at 
the November 26 meeting of the Committee. 

He said that Professor Marshall, the UM/Boston faculty 
representative, had asked what the figures in the budget request 
implied with respect to the 15:1 student/faculty ration. He 
said that she had requested him to call to the attention of the 
Committee the fact that the UM/Boston faculty had apssed several 
resolutions expressing their concern that this ratio be main- 
tained and requesting that the faculty be included in any delib- 
erations proposing a change in this ratio. He asked if the 
budget request contemplated a change in University policy with 
regard to the student /faculty ratio. Mrs. Hanson replied that 
there was no change in general policy, but that due to the posi- 
tion freeze imposed by the Legislature, the effective ratio at 
the present time is greater than 15:1 and that this situation 
would probably continue into the 1977 fiscal year. 

Mr. Gulko said that at UM/Amherst, although the 15:1 ratio 
is used as a means of determining the number of positions re- 
quired, it is not in effect in practice. Chairman Carlson said 
that he would inform Professor Marshall that there has been no 
change in the policy of the University with regard to the 
student ' faculty ratio and request that she communicate this fact 
to the Boston faculty. 



4792 



Budget Comm. 
12/3/75 



Critical Need 
Certification 
(Doc. T76-032) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Carlson asked if there were further questions con- 
cerning the budget document. There being none, upon motion made 
and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the Maintenance Budget Request totalling 
$105,112,093 for the University Operations and 
$11,175,181 for the University Hospital, as 
outlined in Doc. T76-033. 

Chairman Carlson then called the attention of the Committeej 
to the matter of Critical Need Certification (Doc. T76-032) . He ' 
said that of the 788 vacant positions, the campuses had requested 
that 86.5 be certified by the President as critical to the opera-j 
tion of the University. Mr. Gartenberg informed the Committee 
that funding for these positions is available within the present 
budgets. He added that in addition to the critical positions 
included in Doc. T76-032, there were some positions which had 
been requested in September which had not cleared through the 
first process. These, he said, would be added to the list when 
it was submitted to the Secretary of Administration and Finance 
for approval. He added that positions essential for patient care 
were exampted from the critical needs review process. 

After biref discussion, upon motion made and seconded, 
it was 

VOTED : To approve the critical needs as set forth in 
Doc. T76-032. 

Chairman Carlson then called the attention of the Committee 
to a matter not on the agenda. He informed the Committee that 
Mr. Gartenberg would be leaving the employ of the University for 
a position in New York and expressed, on behalf of the Committee 
appreciation for the effective staff work done by Mr. Gartenberg 
with the able assistance of Mrs. Hanson, who will continue to 
serve the Budget Committee. He wished Mr. Gartenberg success 
and happiness in his new endeavor. 



- 



The meeting was adjourned at 1:45 p.m. 



Cbladytt Keith Hardy W 



Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



I 



PRESENT: 



4793 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AFFAIRS 

December 11, 1975; 12:30 p.m. 
Office of the President 
One Washington Mall 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Robertson; President Wood; 
Trustees Abrams, Croce; Mr. Callahan representing Trustee Anrig, 
Mrs. Bluestone representing Trustee Fielding, Dr. Kanner repre- 
senting Trustee Okin; Secretary Hardy; Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Office of the President : Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice President for 
Academic Affairs; Mr. Janis , Senior Vice President for Manage- 
ment and Business Affairs-Designate; Mr. Gartenberg, Budget 
Director; Mr. O'Leary, Assistant Counsel; Ms. Veith, Staff Assist 
and for Academic Affairs 

UM/Worcester : Acting Dean Butcher; Dr. Bulger, Chancellor /Dean- 
designate; Dr. Hittelman, Faculty Representative; Mr. Stockwell, 
Associate Dean for Administrative Affairs and Hospital Director; 
Dr. Wheeler, Chairman of the Department of Surgery and Hospital 
Chief of Staff 

Guest : Dr. John Hoew from the Medical School 

The meeting was called to order at 12:40 p.m. Chairman 
Robertson stated that this was a new Committee, and that although 
the By-laws of the Trustees had not yet been revised to reflect 
the change, they would be soon. He asked the President to speak 
to the Committee on what he saw as its area of special compet- 
ence and focus. President Wood recalled that Trustee Abrams 
had suggested at the October meeting of the Board that such a 
committee would be useful, and also recalled that since the 
statute which had created the Medical School had called for the 
addition of physicians to the Board, Drs. Abrams and Croce had 
made important contributions. The President continued that many 
extremely complex issues relating to the Medical School and 
hospital would be arising in the next few weeks and months, and 
said these would pass from this Committee through the Executive 
Committee to the Board. This Committee, he said, should serve 
to accelerate the Board's work on these issues. 

Chairman Robertson asked Dr. Wheeler for a report on the 
anticipated opening of the University Hospital. Dr. Wheeler 
informed the Committee that the anticipated opening date was 
January 18, and that he felt reasonably sure that this date 
would hold. The building would be ready by early January and he 
expected to have 99 percent of the necessary equipment on hand 
by the opening date. He said the most serious problem had been 
the delay in the release of positions and funds, but that enough 



Health Affairs 
Committee 



4794 



Health Affairs 

Comm. 

12/11/75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



positions had now been released to allow persons hired to begin 
work. He specified that one floor would be opened in the begin- 
ning, and that the Hospital would have an emergency capability, 
but that it would not yet have an emergency room as such. 

Dr. Kanner asked for more specific information as to what 
the Hospital did and did not have in equipment and capability. 
Dr. wheeler replied that all the essential services were ready, 
otherwise the Hospital would not open. He said certain X-ray 
equipment was not yet available, and that the Hospital would not 
have the capability for obstetrics or pediatrics. He explained 
that there would have to be a certain amount of reliance on other 
hospitals for personnel. 

Dr. Butcher observed that there had never yet been a com- 
pletely smooth opening of a new hospital, and that there could 
be no assurance that there would be no snags whatsoever, but he 
also felt that the staff and building would be ready. 

Trustee Croce asked the President for the reason for separa 
ting out the hospital budget in the budget request. There were 
two main reasons, the President replied: (1) that the Hospital, 
unlike the other components of the University, is intended to 
provide income, and (2) because there have been such high start- 
up costs associated with the Hospital that the total budget of 
the University was distorted. 

Chairman Robertson turned next to the University of Massa- 
chusetts Medical Center By-Laws . He asked Vice President Lynton 
for an overview of the document. Mr. Lynton told the Committee 
that no vote was required at this time, but that it had been 
thought useful for this Committee to discuss those sections which 
would need approval by the Executive Committee at its January 
meeting. These were Section 1 — The Medical Center, Section IV — 
The Hospital Management Board and Section V — The Medical Staff . 
Section I essentially defined the status of the Medical Center 
as a full-fledged campus within the multicampus University, under 
the Board of Trustees. He described Section V as a detailed 
and generally straightforward set of rules and regulations, and 
he informed the Committee that counsel had raised some precedural 
questions with respect to the appeals procedure set forth in 
this section. Section IV, the Management Board, was very import- 
ant and would bear careful discussion before approval. 

Dr. Howe informed the Committee that the By-laws repre- 
sented two years of work by different groups within the Medical 
School. He recognized that changes might be necessary as a 
result of discussions. 



Chairman Robertson asked for an explanation of the 
Legislative Commission appointed by the Senate President and the 
Speaker of the House which President Wood had mentioned in his 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

covering memorandum to the By-laws. President Wood explained 
that the Commission represented the concern of the House that 
the goals, missions and functions of the Hospital in this period 
might benefit from a review and appraisal by a Legislative com- 
mittee. The Chairman of the Committee was to be Senator Conte, 
he said, and the House members had not yet been appointed. He 
said he had inserted this reference in the covering memorandum 
because he did not want members of the General Court to think 
that the establishment of the Health Affairs Committee would fore 
close legislative input to the Medical School and Hospital. He 
pointed out that the Commission would be dissolved on July 1, 
1976. 

Trustee Croce said he had seen an editorial in one of the 
Worcester newspapers expressing concern that this Commission might 
meddle with medical affairs, but he said that in his view it was 
a fiscal oversight committee. Mrs. luestone pointed out that 
there had been such a Commission set up by the Legislature to 
oversee the Department of Public Health, and it had proved to be 
an enormously helpful group in that it enabled the Department to 
keep communications with the Legislature open and served to edu- 
cate members of the Legislature about the affairs of the Depart- 
ment. She described the setting up of such a Commission as an 
opportunity to enlist the help of the General Court in these areas 

Mr. O'Leary was asked to explain his concerns about Sec- 
tion V, and he explained that he had raised questions with respect 
to the appeals procedure, which he said might not work as it had 
been intended to and might produce an excessive amount of liti- 
gation. However, he said the problems were entirely correctable. 
Mr. Lynton stressed that different sections of the By-Laws had 
been written by different groups, and that for this reason there 
were occasional inconsistencies in the use of language which 
could be ironed out. 

Chairman Robertson turned the discussion to the proposed 
Hospital Management Board. Trustee Croce said he had read this 
section several times, and he described it as superb. He added 
that he had been so impressed that he had introduced portions 
into the By-Laws of Worcester City Hospital. He then described 
a number of minor points and questions with respect to the word- 
ing of certain sections. A discussion ensued about these points. 

Mrs. Bluestone said that the major issue in her mind was 
the role and authority of the Hospital Management Board. There 
was confusion in the document with respect to its reporting posi- 
tion which she said ought to be cleared up early. In some sec- 
tions it appeared to be advisory, while in others it seemed to 
have substantial authority. She cited what she interpreted as 
examples of overlap with the responsibilities of administrators 
and professionals. President Wood confirmed that this was a key 
issue in the By-Laws, and said there were two relationships which 



4795 



Health Affairs 

Comm. 

12/11/75 



4796 



Health Affairs 

Comm. 

12/11/75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

would need to be ironed out: (1) the relationship of the Hospital 
Management Board to the Board of Trustees, and (2) its relation- 
ship to the Chancellor. Mr. Lynton said that the Management Board 
should not in any way affect the administrative responsibility of 
the Chancellor, and should also not interfere with the line rela- 
tionship from the Chancellor to the President to the Board of 
Trustees. Chairman Robertson agreed that these issues should be 
spelled out. 

Dr. Howe reviewed the "pendulum swing" which he said had 
operated in the drafting of this document, with some feelings 
that the duties of the HMB should be extremely specifically spelled 
out, and with others feeling that they should be kept general. It 
was the Hospital staff's feeling that the Board should not start 
with fixed priorities, but should focus on many areas, at least 
at first, and should later have its special responsibilities 
spelled out. Mrs. Bluestone said that in most hospitals it is 
difficult to change operating procedures because of their vener- 
able tradition. But in a new hospital, she said she felt it was 
desirable to have as many questions of this kind answered in 
advance as possible, so that the Management Board does not become 
tied in knots and unable to act. 

Dr. Bulger suggested that Mrs. Bluestone 's point was that 
the Board of Trustees would have to delegate powers to the Manage- 
ment Board, and he wondered whether that decision could perhaps 
wait until final review of the By-Laws had taken place in September 
1976. President Wood explained that both he and the Trustees had 
the strong feeling that it was not appropriate for the Trustees 
to be running the hospital, and that this kind of delegation should 
in due time take place. On the other hand, he said, there were 
the real questions about how firm the Management Board's initial 
mandate should be. 



Dr. Butcher agreed that this was a unique opportunity to 
avoid pitfalls before they happen, but stressed that this was 
also a unique situation: there had never before been a Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts Hospital in this place at this time, and 
he said he felt it was necessary to be flexible at the beginning 
because it could not be known for sure what exactly would work. 
Dr. Kanner observed that it is desirable to be flexible, but that 
whether the Management Board was advisory or could make decisions 
was a key issue and not merely one of specific function. 

Specific questions and problems with Section IV were 
pointed out and discussed, and a discussion ensued as to the 
necessary timetable for approval of the By-Laws. Dr. Wheeler 
I was asked how much of the By-Laws had to be approved before the 
Hospital opened, and he said that Section V , The Medical Staff, 
would be needed. It was agreed that Dr. Howe and his committee 
would consult with Mrs. Bluestone in working out a more specific 
mandate for the Management Board, addressing the issues of 



4797 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

authority and reporting relationships, while the other necessary 
parts of the By-Laws could be approved in substance and passed 
along to the Executive Committee. 

The next matter was the Utilization Review Plan for the 
University of Massachusetts Hospital (Doc. T76-035) . Dr. Wheeler 
explained that there must be an established plan for review of 
utilization of hospital services to avoid excessive length of stay 
or other poor utilization of services, in order for Medicare or 
other third-party payers to agree to make payments. The language 
of the document was standard with others of its type. Upon motion 
made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Executive Committee 
approve and adopt the Utilization Review 
Plan for the University of Massachusetts 
Hospital as set forth in Trustee Document 
T76-035. 

The final agenda item was the proposed Interagency Agree- 
ment #1 between the University of Massachusetts Medical Center 
and the Executive Office of Human Services (Doc. T76-031A) . Mr. 
Lynton recalled that one of the goals of the Medical School as 
adopted by the Board on October 1 was the improvement of health 
care delivery to the Commonwelath, particularly to clients of 
public institutions. Work has been going on in this direction 
for some time, he said, but this proposal looked toward systemati2 
ing it and to expanding its scope. The intention, he said, was 
for specific services to be governed by specific contracts, while 
the overall character of the contracts and of priorities is set 
by this umbrella agreement. The Agreement provides guidelines 
for the later development of specific contracts and enables 
Acting Dean Butcher and Chancellor Bulger to develop such con- 
tracts with the appropriate institutions. 

The highlights of the Agreement, said Mr. Lynton, were 
that it places services in a statewide context by establishing a 
Statewide Medical Advisory Committee to assist in developing 
subsequent agreements, and that it spells out the ways in which 
the Medical Center will work with the Office of Human Services 
with respect to the hiring of personnel and payment for services. 
The Agreement had been reviewed by the Statewide Medical Advisory 
Committee, he said, which had been operating for about a month. 



Mrs. Bluestone said that this agreement had been a coopera- 
tive effort, and said she believed it would be extremely beneficial 
to all parties. She pointed out that the new Secretary of Human 
Services had not seen the Agreement, and she said she would dis- 
cuss it with him. 

Trustee Abrams asked whether clinical faculty who were 
performing services in a state institution would hold a joint 
appointment, and he asked how such a person would be paid. Dr. 



Health Affairs 

Comm. 

12/11/75 



Utilization 
Review Plan 
(Doc. T76-035) 



Interagency 
Agreement #1 
(Doc. T76-031A) 



4798 



Health Affairs 

Coram. 

12/11/75 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Howe and Dr. Butcher stressed that such a person would not be 
receiving two salaries from two different state departments, but 
that the Department of Mental or Public Health would pay for 
such services directly into the Group Practice of the Medical 
School, which would in turn make payments to clinical faculty. 

Mr. O'Leary said that details of this type would be worked 
out in subsequent contracts, each of which would differ on the 
basis of type of institutions involved. He described this Agree- 
ment as setting the broad parameters of the cooperative relation- 
ships, with the "nuts and bolts" to be ironed out when actual 
agreements for specific services to institutions are developed. 

Chairman Robertson asked how the cost of services would 
be determined, and he raised the question of potential loss of 
revenue to the Hospital. Mr. O'Leary answered the first question 
by saying that the cost to the institutions served would be governed 
by the standard rates set by the Rate-Setting Commission. Addres- 
sing the second question, Dr. Howe agreed that there would be some: 
loss in potential revenue, but that the benefits to be accrued 
were worth the cost. Chairman Robertson said he believed that it 
would be wise to keep track of these potential losses, in case 
the deficit for the Hospital next year should be greater than had 
been anticipated. In other words, the University would be in the 
position, if such were to happen, to put down a portion of the 
deficit to services rendered to the Departments of Public and 
Mental Health. 

Acting Dean Butcher remarked that all of the staff of the 
Medical School had a strong commitment to the opening of the 
Hospital; at the same time, they feel that this kind of Agreement 
is highly appropriate for them to be involved in. He said he was 
convinced that the public would be highly in favor of it, and 
he said he was personally gratified by the enthusiasm and expertise 
of the task force which had drafted it and by the receptiveness 
of the Office of Human Services. He said that while there might 
be some loss of revenue to the Hosptial, the clear mandate and 
the enthusiasm of the clinical faculty at the Medical School made 
it worthwhile. He said that the Medical School woukd keep its 
eye on the cost. Dr. Wheeler also made the point that these 
agreements would be worked out one at a time, and there was no 
chance that the School would overcommit itself . There was no 
further discussion, and the question was moved, seconded and 



VOTED : To recommend that the Executive Committee 
authorize the President of the University, 
the Chancellor/Dean Designate of the 
University of Massachusetts Medical Center 
and the Acting Dean of the University of 
Massachusetts Medical School to execute 
on behalf of the University the Inter- 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

agency Agreement #1 set forth in Trustee Docu- 
ment T76-031A, or as said Agreement may be 
amended by the parties; further, to recommend 
that the Chancellor/Dean of the Medical Center 
or, if necessary, the Acting Dean of the Medi- 
cal School, in consultation with the President 
of the University, be authorized to negotiate 
and to execute contracts developed in accord- 
ance with the provisions of the aforementioned 
Interagency Agreement . 

There was no further business to come before the Committee, 
and the meeting was adjourned at 2:40 p.m. 



4799 



Health Affairs 

Comm. 

12/11/75 



piadysl Keith Hardy Y 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



PRESENT: 



Hospital 
Opening 



Malpractice 
and General 
Liability 
Insurance 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AFFAIRS 



January 6, 1976; 12:30 p.m. 
Room CC-114, Medical Science Building 
University of Massachusetts/Worcester 

Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Robertson, Trustees Abrams , 



Croce, Mr. Callahan representing Trustee Anrig, Mrs. Bluestone 
representing Trustee Fielding, Dr. Kanner representing Trustee 
Okin; Secretary Hardy; Treasurer Johnson; Mr. Mehegan, recorder 

Office of the President: Mr. Lynton, Senior Vice President for 



Academic Affairs, Mrs. Hanson, Associate Budget Director; Mr. 
O'Leary, Assistant Counsel 

UM/Worcester : Chancellor /Dean-designate Bulger; Acting Dean 
Butcher; Dr. Smith, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Pro- 
vost; Mr. Cathey, Controller; Professor Chlapowski; Dr. Canada; 
Dr. Dalen; Dr. Howe; Dr. Hittelman, Faculty Representative; Mr. 
Stockwell, Associate Dean for Administrative Affairs and Hospital 
Director; Mr. Brennan, representing students 

The meeting was called to order at 12:40 p.m. Chairman 
Robertson asked Acting Dean Butcher to report on the progress of 
the Hospital opening. Dr. Butcher deferred to Mr. Stockwell, the 
Hospital Director, who reported that the opening was proceeding 
on schedule for the 18th of January with a little girl scheduled 
for orthopedic surgery on the 19th. One 72-bed floor was to be 
opened, with 28 beds available to start. As necessary, the other 
beds on the floor will be opened. 

Mr. Stockwell reported on the details of certification by 
the Department of Public Health and on staffing for the hospital. 
He said there had been no difficulty in acquiring nursing staff 
and that there had been no complaints from the Worcester area 
hospitals about staff problems as a result of University recruit- I 
ment. The hardest staff to find, he said, were laboratory techni- 
cians for supervisory capacities. There had been a minor delay 
in the delivery of certain laboratory equipment. The manufacturer, 
located in Wisconsin, requires that technicians for this equip- 
ment must be trained at the factory. This is being done and the 
consequent delay would not prove serious because appropriate 
laboratory coverage had been arranged with the Leary Laboratory 
in Boston. Mr. Stockwell added that he doubted that the Leary 
Laboratory would need to be used more than a few times. 

Mr. Stockwell had mentioned insurance in the course of 
his report, and Treasurer Johnson next gave information about 
this. With respect to malpractice, the policy purchased from the 
Medical Malpractice Joint Underwriting Association covered the 
hospital and those who work in it with the exception of the physi- 
cians, although the Treasurer said he believed physicians could 
be brought under the policy on a name basis. 



I 



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► 



I 



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4801 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Turning to general liability insurance, Treasurer Johnson 
pointed out that the general liability insurance purchased last 
year had covered the Amherst and Boston campuses and the Medical 
School, but not the hospital. He would propose to the Executive 
Committee that general liability insurance for the hospital also 
be purchased from the JUA, so that disputes over coverage would 
not arise from the medical malpractice insurance being written 
by one company and the hospital general liability being written 
by another. All of the hospital insurance would be written by 
the JUA. 

Chairman Robertson asked for a report on patient admis- 
sions policy for the hospital. Dr. Butcher said this issue was 
currently under discussion with the President's office and has 
as yet not been resolved. The Medical School, he pointed out, 
had been originally planned to have one hundred full-time clinical 
faculty but, because of the budget problems of the past year, 
actually had about forty. For this reason the hospital would oper 
without being able to give coverage in all areas, but would pro- 
vide this coverage by relying on specialists in the Worcester 
area. Such voluntary clinical faculty should have, he believed, 
the right to admit patients to the hosptial. 



The issue which needed to be addressed, he said, was 
whether the hospital should be open or closed. His view was that 
it should be "semi-open," that patients who come to the hospital 
to be admitted — assuming they are not comatose — should be asked 
whether they have a Worcester physician and advised that they 
should seek his assistance. On the other hand, those voluntary 
faculty who teach the medical students should have the right to 
admit patients to the hospital He also pointed out that under 
the law the hospital cannot refuse to admit a patient. 

Dr. Butcher also mentioned the issue of the return of 
clinical income to clinical faculty under the terms of the Group 
Practice Plan. Full members of the Group Practice are heavily 
taxed for the income they generate, but he said he felt it would 
be inadvisable to invite a physician into the hospital to provide 
a service and then take half of the income he generates. Dr. 
Dalen stated that the principal issue was whether or not part-time 
clinical faculty would have admission privileges; taxation, he 
said, was a less serious issue. His view was that they must have 
the privileges, because they had performed the teaching function 
at the Medical School before it had its own faculty, and could 
not now be told, in effect, that they were no longer needed. 
Another issue, he said, was what the impact of this privilege 
would be on the teaching function. 

Dr. Bulger addressed the taxation issue, describing a 
system of payment which might resolve the issues that Dr. Butcher 
and Dr. Dalen had raised. Drs. Butcher and Dalen, as well as 
Mr. Lynton, indicated that Dr. Bulger's ideas were valuable and 
worth considering further. 



Health Affairs 

Comm. 

1/6/76 



4802 



Health Affairs 

Comm. 

1/6/76 



Medical Center 

By-laws 

(Doc. T76-034A) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Lynton said he believed that a concrete admitting 
policy would have to be approved by the Board of Trustees, and 
that it was likely to be a permanent, and not a short-term, solu- 
tion. Chairman Robertson said he was concerned that the hospital 
was about to open without any admitting policy. This was a criti- 
cal issue which must be resolved soon, he said. Mr. Lynton com- 
mented that he believed that the issue could be resolved within 
a few weeks, and that the taxation issue was less pressing and 
could be resolved on an interim basis pending a permanent solu- 
tion. He pointed out that the Medical School did have a priority 
list for patient admissions. 

Mrs. Bluestone said that something ought to be said for 
the absolute right of patients to go to the hospital that they 
wish, and she also pointed out that the hospital administration 
ought not to go out of its way to avoid impinging on the Worcester 
area hospital census, because of the concern on the part of the 
Legislature over the size of the hospital deficit. Dr. Butcher 
said he was aware of this concern, and described the situation 
as being "caught between a rock and a hard place" in that the 
concern for not competing with the local hospitals might not be 
compatible with keeping down the deficit. Mr. Callahan remarked 
that he had been hearing complimentary reports about the medical 
care that the Medical School had been providing, and he said that 
he believed that if the School must err in this dilemma, it would 
be better to err on the side of medical care. If it did so, he 
said he was certain that it would have the support of the Trustees 



Mr. Stockwell then offered the following information 
about the patient profiles for the outpatient clinics: of the 
initial 3500 visits, 40 percent were from outside central Massa- 
chusetts, while only 30 percent were from the Worcester area. 

The discussion was then turned to the Medical Center By^ 



laws (Doc. T76-034A). Mr. Lynton informed the Committee that 
the By-laws had been carefully revised since the last meeting of 
the Health Affairs Committee. Legal counsel had advised that 
the Hospital Management Board must have an advisory role since 
the Board of Trustees could not legally delegate the responsi- 
bilities as contemplated by the original draft of the By-laws. 
This had been one of the principal concerns of the Committee. 
The reporting relationship between the HMB, the Chancellor, the 
President and the Board of Trustees was also clarified. Finally ^ 
the appeals procedure had been streamlined in line with recom- 
mendations of Assistant Counsel O'Leary. Several Trustees ex- 
pressed their satisfaction with the improvements, although Mrs. 
Bluestone said she believed the HMB would have to have more 
management capabilities eventually if the Board of Trustees was 
not to become bogged down with direct management of the hospital 
The possibility of introducing legislation to enable the Board 
to delegate some of this responsibility was mentioned. Upon a 
motion made and seconded, it was 



I 



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I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend that the Executive Committee 
approve and adopt the following sections 
and articles of Doc. T76-034A, the By-laws 
of the University of Massachusetts Medical 
Center : 

Section I, Articles I and II; Section III, 
Articles I and II; Section IV, Articles I- 
IV and Section V, Articles I-VII, IX-XIV, 
with the provision that these By-laws be 
reviewed in their entirety by the Board of 
Trustees no later than September 1, 1976 
after receiving the comments and recom- 
mendations of the University of Massachu- 
setts Hospital Review Commission. 



B 



4803 



Health Affairs 

Comm. 

1/6/76 



Poison Control 
Information 



I 



Mr. Lynton then advised the Committee on a discussion- 
only item relating to the establishment of a Poison Control and 
Information Center at the hospital. Dr. Butcher asked Dr. Andrew Center 
Canada, Chairman of the Department of Pharmacy, to explain his 
proposal to the Committee. Dr. Canada informed the Committee 
that he had inquired of the Department of Public Health as to the 
possibility of the Medical Center's being named as a Poison Infor- 
mation Center. The DPH had reactivated a committee to study 
this, and the Committee had ascertained that such services out- 
side the Boston area were poor. Dr. Canada had then asked the 
Medical School department heads whether they would support the 
establishment of such a service, and their response had been 
favorable. 

Dr. Canada explained that "seed money" was available 
from the federal government through the Emergency Medical Servic^ 
group of the Department of Public Health which should cover the 
total cost for the first two years. After that time, if no 
outside funding could be secured, the net cost to the University 
would be about $75,000 per year. 

Trustee Croce asked whether such a program would inter- 
fere with existing poison control centers in Worcester, and Dr. 
Canada emphasized that the center would be a tertiary referral 
center. It would work with existing centers to up-grade their 
standards and provide specialized support for their activities. 

After hearing the presentation, the Committee encouraged 
the development of a formal proposal for the establishment of th£ 
center. 

Finally, Mr. Lynton informed the Committee that after it Interagency 
had recommended approval of the Interagency Agreement #1 (Doc. Agreement #1 



T76-031B), the Secretary of Human Services had requested that 
the Secretary of Educational Affairs be made a signatory of the 
agreement and a member of the Statewide Medical Affairs Committee 



(Doc. T76-031B) 



4804 



Health Affairs 

Coram. 

1/6/76 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The document had been amended and would be presented with the 
amendment to the Executive Committee for approval. There was no 
further discussion, and the meeting was adjourned at 2:25 p.m. 



CGladyl Keith Hardy I 



idy 

Secretary to the Board of Trustees 



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